Blogs Walker Seen Seen

Seen: Marked Leather at the Walker Shop

As the first designer featured in the Walker Shop’s new Local Maker Profiles, Scott Loeser of Marked Leather is capturing our attention with his beautifully crafted, ruggedly stylish bags and the stories behind them. Using reclaimed leather to create unique products, Marked Leather shares a dedication to responsible upcycling of used materials as well as […]

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As the first designer featured in the Walker Shop’s new Local Maker Profiles, Scott Loeser of Marked Leather is capturing our attention with his beautifully crafted, ruggedly stylish bags and the stories behind them. Using reclaimed leather to create unique products, Marked Leather shares a dedication to responsible upcycling of used materials as well as a creative commitment to the history preserved in each scuff and scratch. Marked Leather goods are handmade in Minnesota and designed to function effortlessly in daily life with their classic structure and aesthetic. In advance of his December 11 visit to the Walker for Art School, Loeser talks about finding a niche for his company, calling the artistic shots, and Minnesota makers to appreciate.

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Describe what you make: I make leather carry goods like satchels, duffles, and totes. The leather I select for my products is heavily branded and blemished. I think this part of the hide shares the most character and really tells a story.

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Marked Leather Weekender Bag in dark brown

When and how did you get started? I started in 2012 in my Uptown apartment. I started hand sewing wallets there. The money that I sold from the wallet sales helped me afford my first major order of leather that would become the first line of Marked Leather goods.

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Marked Leather Top Loading Duffel in miel

Where do you make your goods? Currently I have a shared studio space in Northeast Minneapolis. I make some of the bags there myself. The manufacturing that I do is all done in Wabasha, Minnesota. They make the more involved designs.

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Marked Leather Shanghai Bag in dark brown

What inspires what you make? I’ve always wanted to do my own thing, call the shots, etc. It wasn’t until after researching leather goods made especially with marked leather and finding none that I thought it was worth a shot trying to be the first to create a quality, high-end leather bag with that material.

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What other MN Makers do you love? Knots Belt and Clothing Co., Mill City Fineries, and the Great Lakes Collection.

Advice to aspiring makers: This takes time!! And some money, but more importantly patience. There isn’t just one way to create a business so remember to be as creative with that as you are with designing.

Join Loeser this Sunday, December 11, during our Art School workshop for a conversation on designing with reclaimed material and breaking into the American cut and sew industry, as part of the. Check out his work on Instagram and Twitter (@markedleather).

An Opening Reception for Lee Kit’s Hold your breath, dance slowly

On May 11th, Walker Contributing Members gathered in the Cargill Lounge to celebrate the opening of Hold your breath, dance slowly, the first U.S. solo museum exhibition of Taiwan-based artist Lee Kit. The instillation combines Lee’s paint-based practice and his object-based practice to explore the poetics of everyday materials and household items. Contributing Members were […]

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On May 11th, Walker Contributing Members gathered in the Cargill Lounge to celebrate the opening of Hold your breath, dance slowly, the first U.S. solo museum exhibition of Taiwan-based artist Lee Kit. The instillation combines Lee’s paint-based practice and his object-based practice to explore the poetics of everyday materials and household items. Contributing Members were treated to a sneak-peek inside the Burnet Gallery a day before the exhibition’s public opening. Those present were immersed in what Walker Executive Director Olga Viso referred to in her opening remarks as Lee’s “spatial flow,” an experience at once otherworldly and familiar.

Peter Hyman and Mary McDiarmid, excited to experience Lee’s work for the first time and step outside of their comfort zones.

Peter Hyman and Mary McDiarmid, excited to experience Lee’s work for the first time and step outside of their comfort zones.

(From left) Bryan Pieper and Lily Prinsen, designers at KNOCK, along with Public Functionary Co-Director/Curator Tricia Khutoretsky and Walker Tour Guide Susan Ziel.

(From left) Bryan Pieper and Lily Prinsen, designers at KNOCK, along with Public Functionary Co-Director/Curator Tricia Khutoretsky and Walker Tour Guide Susan Ziel.

Minnesota-based artist Chris Larson, whose new video instillation Land Speed Record opens in the Walker’s Medtronic Gallery on June 9th.

Minnesota-based artist Chris Larson, whose new video instillation Land Speed Record opens in the Walker’s Medtronic Gallery on June 9th.

Exhibition curator Misa Jeffereis with Lee Kit. In her opening remarks, Jeffereis expressed her gratitude for Lee’s “calm and positive presence [radiating] outward towards all of us in the gallery.”

Exhibition curator Misa Jeffereis with Lee Kit. In her opening remarks, Jeffereis expressed her gratitude for Lee’s “calm and positive presence [radiating] outward towards all of us in the gallery.”

Renan Jeffereis and Gail Kaminishi, parents of curator Misa Jeffereis, came in from Seattle to celebrate their daughter’s first solo curated show at the Walker.

Renan Jeffereis and Gail Kaminishi, parents of curator Misa Jeffereis, came in from Seattle to celebrate their daughter’s first solo curated show at the Walker.

Fashion blogger Chelsea Ivan and her husband Jeremiah Ivan, recent Twin Cities transplants from New York City.

Fashion blogger Chelsea Ivan and her husband Jeremiah Ivan, recent Twin Cities transplants from New York City.

Kerry Morgan and Christina Schmid, a faculty member in the University of Minnesota Art Department and a critic who has written for Art Forum, Flash Art, ARTPULSE, and more.

Kerry Morgan and Christina Schmid, a faculty member in the University of Minnesota Art Department and a critic who has written for Art Forum, Flash Art, ARTPULSE, and more.

Walker Executive Director Olga Viso addresses the crowd, praising the “incredible architectural environment” Lee has designed for this site-specific exhibition.

Walker Executive Director Olga Viso addresses the crowd, praising the “incredible architectural environment” Lee has designed for this site-specific exhibition.

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From the left) Wenjing Wang, artist Lee Kit, Walker Artistic Director Fionn Meade, and Anne Labovitz

(From the left) Wenjing Wang, artist Lee Kit, Walker Artistic Director Fionn Meade, and Anne Labovitz.

Lee Kit: Hold your breath, dance slowly will be on display in the Peggy and Ralph Burnet Gallery until October 9, 2016.

Hold your breath, dance slowly will be on display in the Peggy and Ralph Burnet Gallery until October 9, 2016.

Cherry PhotoBomb

Here at the Walker we have been noticing some really funny, creative photos on social media that visitors take with the artwork. From posing in front of favorite paintings to selfies in reflective surfaces, one variation of photo we see again and again features Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s 1988 sculpture, Spoonbridge and Cherry in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Some pretend […]

Here at the Walker we have been noticing some really funny, creative photos on social media that visitors take with the artwork. From posing in front of favorite paintings to selfies in reflective surfaces, one variation of photo we see again and again features Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s 1988 sculpture, Spoonbridge and Cherry in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Some pretend to hold the cherry by its stem, some pretend to hold the spoon, and many pretend to eat the cherry. It seems to have become Minneapolis’s own Tower of Pisa meme.

If you want to post your own creative photo with Spoonbridge and Cherry on social media, use the hashtag, #SpoonCherry. We have been posting some of our favorite examples on our Pinterest board, which you can visit to get some inspiration for your own photos.

Here are ten of our favorite ideas for creating your own #SpoonCherry pic!

1. “The Lovin’ Spoonful”

Directions: Use one hand to hold the spoon and open wide.

 

2. “Cherry Yummy”

Directions: This one is pretty #selfie friendly; just open your mouth and position yourself so it looks like you’re about the eat the cherry.

<cherry_tasting > #SpoonBridgeAndCherry

A photo posted by | | (@njoymentminster) on

 

3. “Cherry Picker”

Directions: Use one hand to hold the stem of the cherry.

#Spoonbridge & Cherry Sculpture #minneapolis

A photo posted by @travelqueen on

 

4. “Born with a Silver Spoon”

Directions: Use one or both hands to hold the end of the spoon.

#picoftheday #spoonbridgeandcherry #Minneapolis #art #Minnesota #twincities #fall #vacation

A photo posted by Gio de Gracia (@giodegracia) on

 

5. “A Cherry Good Time”

Directions: Make your best jump!

https://instagram.com/p/vfLpDysTzX

 

6. “Pretty Please, with a Cherry on Top”

Directions: This one is another #selfie friendly option. Position yourself so the cherry appears on top of your head.

 

7. “Cherry PhotoBomb”

Directions: Hold the stem of the cherry with one hand, and open wide!

 

8. “Spoonful of Cherry”

Directions: This one’s easy; from a distance, hold the spoon with your hand.

Damn it! My spoon fell in the pond :/ #minneapolis #spoonbridge

A photo posted by Paul Chaca (@chacaflockaflame) on

 

9. “Cherry Grab”

Directions: From a distance, grab the cherry as if it were a ball.

https://instagram.com/p/tswjVIp7SH/

 

10. “SpoonBridge Pose”

Directions: Calling all yogis! Do any yoga pose that aligns with the sculpture; you can get really creative with this one.

Seen: The Big Chair Before the Big Stage

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Olawale Toriola of Egypt 80 relaxing before Seun Kuti and his band took the stage at Rock the Garden 2015.

Walker People’s Archive: Guides, Crew and Guards, Seen 1929-2015

At the Walker People’s Archive, we’ve been collecting photographs and stories illustrating people’s most vivid Walker memories. Walker visitors, staff members past and present, arts luminaries and all kinds of scenesters have contributed to the project.  But this contribution takes the cake (there’s cake at the WPA site, too!): Tom Berglund passed along this picture, […]

Anna Jorgenson, Walker Art Galleries, 1929

Anna Jorgenson, Walker Art Galleries, 1929

At the Walker People’s Archive, we’ve been collecting photographs and stories illustrating people’s most vivid Walker memories. Walker visitors, staff members past and present, arts luminaries and all kinds of scenesters have contributed to the project.  But this contribution takes the cake (there’s cake at the WPA site, too!): Tom Berglund passed along this picture, of his mother’s mother, Anna Jorgenson, at work as a docent in the Walker Art Galleries in the 1920s.  In 1940, the Walker Art Galleries were rechristened the Walker Art Center, and the institution began a new life–with a new orientation toward the public–under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration and its Federal Arts Project.  It’s that anniversary we’ve been celebrating–but it’s a thrill to have this photo from even further back.

We’ve got many other photos of guides and other Walker workers through the years, like this one of Richard Parnell and Willie Willette, members of the Walker’s exhibition crew in the 1990s, horsing around for the (Polaroid) camera during preparation of Jenny Holzer’s The Living Series for installation in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden in 1993.

Richard Parnell and Willie Willette, Walker Art Center, 1993

Richard Parnell and Willie Willette, Walker Art Center, 1993

Or this recent shot of Todd Balthazor, gallery guard and illustrator, and his story about his ultimate Walker celebrity sighting.

Todd Balthazor, Walker Art Center, 2015

Todd Balthazor, Walker Art Center, 2015

We’re wrapping up this project over the next few weeks; we’ll close the submission side of the web site after March 30.  That means you have just one more week to share your Walker memories!  All contributions to the archive over the course of the project will remain online, and they will be preserved by the Walker’s Archives and Libraries department as a special collection that will help future generations see how we thought of ourselves at this anniversary moment.  Go to the Walker People’s Archive to upload or learn more.

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon 2015

Edit-a-thon Participants

Art +Feminism Sign

On Sunday, March 8, many Wikipedians, both new and seasoned in editing, filled the Walker Library and Art Lab to contribute to the second annual Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, in celebration of International Women’s Day. This satellite event was one of more than 70 that took place internationally over the weekend. The goal of this event is to narrow the vast gender gap that exists on Wikipedia by representing more feminism and art related topics. In 2011, the Wikimedia Foundation found that women only account for 8.5 percent of Wikipedia editors. This enormous disparity accounts for the general lack of women in the arts being represented on the world’s largest online encyclopedia and seventh most popular website, globally.

Art + Feminism’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon event was in February of 2014. Following the success of this event, organizers of the event were included in Foreign Policy Magazine’s List of 100 Leading Global Thinkers.

Edit-a-thon Participants

The day started off with an introduction to the event and its deeper purposes by Walker hosts Amy Fox, Jill Vuchetich, and Margit Wilson, followed by an informational crash course in Wikipedia editing led by Wikipedia experts. They went over the Wikipedia coding language, which included the general layout of an article, how to bold and italicize words, and how to add citations. There are also many rules and guidelines for editing and creating Wikipedia pages that must be taken into account to avoid criticism from the Wikipedia community experts. Articles must be written objectively, have citations from reliable sources, be respectful, and be notable subjects or considered important by the rest of the Wikipedia community.

In a recent article from Hyperallergic, Sarah Cowan writes about the flagship event that took place at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She comments on, “how deeply skewed Wikipedia’s measures of importance are.”

What actually makes something important? Wikipedia’s five pillars state that they, “strive for articles that document and explain the major points of view.”

If the majority of editors are men, then subjects and points of view that women may find to be very important can easily be shot down and deleted. Cowan found this pillar to be a bit ironic for the purposes of the event, in that part of the feminist initiative is to, “give underprivileged members of society a voice.”

List of Edits

Thirty-five topics and artist pages were created or improved upon during the afternoon. Pages were created for artists internationally such as the Canadian artist collective, FASTWÜRMS, and Chinese multimedia artist, Cao Fei. Pages were also created on American painters, Sarah Crowner and Dianna Molzan, whose works have been featured at the Walker Art Center exhibition, Painter Painter.

It is likely that participants will take their editing skills home with them, continuing their efforts on expanding topics on art and feminism. What was accomplished by the participants on Sunday was a fantastic addition to the ever expanding topics on art and feminism being represented on Wikipedia. However, the more important accomplishment of this event was empowering both men and women, alike, to create a more equal representation of gender on Wikipedia.

Seen: The Softer Side of John Killacky

Former Walker performance curator John Killacky is known for bringing edgy—and timely—artists to the Walker. In the height of the Culture Wars, he welcomed artists dealing with AIDS, sexuality, gender, politics, race, and cultural identity, including Karen Finley, Bill T. Jones, Coco Fusco and Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ron Athey, among many others. In the course […]

Keith HaringFormer Walker performance curator John Killacky is known for bringing edgy—and timely—artists to the Walker. In the height of the Culture Wars, he welcomed artists dealing with AIDS, sexuality, gender, politics, race, and cultural identity, including Karen Finley, Bill T. Jones, Coco Fusco and Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ron Athey, among many others. In the course of writing for us about the political side of another artist of the era, the late Keith Haring, Killacky dug up a photo of himself from during his tenure here (1988–1996): outfitted in Haring merchandise and surrounded by children of Walker staffers, the image captures the softer side of John.

Read Killacky’s recent writings for the Walker:

The Political Provocations of Keith Haring

Story/Time: Bill T. Jones on John Cage

A Performance Chronology: John Killacky Remembers the 1980s

“Seen” highlights one-off photos of Walker life as captured by our staff.

Walker Selfie: Staff Kicks of WALKER@75 Celebration

An all-staff email Wednesday afternoon alerted Walker staffers to be in the Medtronic Gallery in eight minutes for a surprise. There, director Olga Viso was waiting with glasses of champagne poured to toast staff for all their hard work and passion in preparing for commencement of the WALKER@75 anniversary celebration and tomorrow’s opening of the […]

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An all-staff email Wednesday afternoon alerted Walker staffers to be in the Medtronic Gallery in eight minutes for a surprise. There, director Olga Viso was waiting with glasses of champagne poured to toast staff for all their hard work and passion in preparing for commencement of the WALKER@75 anniversary celebration and tomorrow’s opening of the Art at the Center exhibition. As we were all gathered in the Selfie Station—a gallery filled with massive murals from key moments in Walker history—we stopped in front of a photo documenting a 1940 children’s dance festival in the original Walker lobby for a group portrait.

Come celebrate with us during Walktoberfest this Thursday through Sunday (free admission! a beer garden with local brews! free films and live music! tons more!) and throughout the months leading up to January 4, 2015, the 75th anniversary of the Walker rebirth as a public art center. If you wind up at the Selfie Station—where you can reenact the Trisha Brown Dance Company’s 2008 performance of Man Walking Down the Side of a Building, pose with a Once Group performer who in 1965 was duct-taped to a wall, or vamp with Keith Haring in 1984—be sure to use the #AtTheWalker hashtag on Instagram.

“Seen” highlights one-off photos of Walker life as captured by our staff.

Seen: Bath Time in the Garden

In the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, Henry Moore’s Standing Figure: Knife Edge (1961) gets a bath, May 29, 2014. “Seen” highlights one-off photos of Walker life as captured by our staff.

Seen: Surveillance and the Super State

Liam Gillick’s mural The Whatnot Itself Becomes a Super State (2008)—part of the 9 Artists exhibition, and just acquired for the Walker collection, as captured on a Walker security camera and re-mediated by curator Bartholomew Ryan on Instagram. “Seen” highlights one-off photos of Walker life as captured by our staff.

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Liam Gillick’s mural The Whatnot Itself Becomes a Super State (2008)—part of the 9 Artists exhibition, and just acquired for the Walker collection, as captured on a Walker security camera and re-mediated by curator Bartholomew Ryan on Instagram.

“Seen” highlights one-off photos of Walker life as captured by our staff.

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