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Fashion at the Radical Presence Opening

July 24 celebrated the opening of Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art in the Target and Friedman Galleries. As the show itself spans three generations of artists, similarly there were guests of all ages and backgrounds in attendance. Performances of the night were held inside and outside of the galleries and interacted with the […]

Jordan and Aaron Marx stop by Benjamin Patterson's Pond (1962) for a quick photo. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Jordan and Aaron Marx stop by Benjamin Patterson’s Pond (1962) for a quick photo. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

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Terry Adkins’ The Last Trumpet set up at the entrance of Radical Presence. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

July 24 celebrated the opening of Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art in the Target and Friedman Galleries. As the show itself spans three generations of artists, similarly there were guests of all ages and backgrounds in attendance. Performances of the night were held inside and outside of the galleries and interacted with the artwork. Large crowds gathered around to view Terry Adkins’ The Last Trumpet, Senga Nengudi’s Untitled (RSVP) performed by Maren Hassinger, Pope.L’s Costume Made of Nothing, and Jacolby Satterwhite’s Orifice.

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Jacolby Satterwhite captures the audience’s attention on Satch Hoyt’s Say It Loud. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

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Guests relax and chat in the Cargill lobby. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

It was amazing to watch the artists perform and bring another experience to the pieces in the show. The space remained packed throughout the evening as everyone navigated their way through the galleries. The whole evening had immense energy and a shared sense of enthusiasm. In addition to the performances, it was fun to witness the different styles of expression through guests’ clothing. I was able to document just a few of the interesting styles seen that night and inquire about their fashion choices.

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Destiny Anderson’s fun outfit caught my eye before she even got to the exhibition. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Name: Destiny Anderson

What are you wearing? A red and black head scarf (store unknown), a white cropped tee from H&M, a calf-length African printed skirt, light brown heels from Goodwill

Describe your style in three words. Old school, colorful, and outlandish

Do you expect your style to speak for you? I feel my style describes me perfectly and can speak for my personality.

Have people from other generations inspired your style? My family. I always see pictures of my parents and aunts and uncles when they were younger. They always looked so cool to me, and their style now doesn’t stop me from going through their closet.

Social Media: @notorious_destiny on Instagram

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Jaafar Alnabi in the Radical Presence galleries. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Name: Jaafar Alnabi

Occuption: Art Student at MCAD

What are you wearing? Everything is H&M, and shoes are from Aldo

Describe your style in three words. Dark, Americana, and Curtain

Do you expect your style to speak for you? I think someone’s style speaks about them all the time. It’s a way of saying who you are without saying anything. I think my style speaks about me in a way, except you caught me on a lazy day!

Social Media: @jaafaralnabi on Instagram

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Junauda Petrus and Sarah White allowed me to capture their amazing outfits. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Names: Junauda Petrus & Sarah White

Occupation: Petrus—writer, dancer, derformance artist, co-founder of Free Black Dirt; White—singer, photographer, creative

What are you wearing? Petrus—I’m wearing a mustard-colored silk shirt from B. Resale, jeans from Buffalo Exchange in San Francisco, the knitted red necklace I bought from a sister in Brooklyn, sandals from DSW, gold earrings from Savers, and blue dangly earrings from a sister in front of Palmer’s.

White—Hat from H&M, earrings and top from Cliché, bracelet from Belle Weather, septum ring from BVLA, ring made by Sol Rebel, skirt from some shop off the beach in Orange County, vintage clutch, XOXO shoes.

Describe your style in three words. Petrus—Cosmic, warrior, goddess. White—Gangsta, hippie, and eclectic.

Do you expect your style to speak for you? White—I try to speak though my style, but stay away from the expectations. In general, my style often reflects what I am feeling like at a certain stage of my life, but I think if I had more time to dig and more funds to splurge, I’d definitely turn it up a notch and be even more expressive.

Have people from other generations inspired your style?  Petrus—Yes, I am channeling Whoopi Goldberg from the Jumpin’ Jack Flash days, Afrobeat queen, 1970′s Abby Lincoln, and Sally Bowles from Cabaret.

Social Media: @sarahwhiteblack on Twitter, @shirodame on Instagram

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ADDAM gives a peace sign while in the galleries. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Name: ADDAM

What are you wearing? Hair styled by Loc Starz, pants from William Rast, top from Club Monaco, shoes from H&M, glasses from RETROSUPERFUTURE

Describe your style in three words. I like it.

Do you expect your style to speak for you? I expect my style to be an honest representation of myself, even when I fail to meet those expectations, which makes it all the more honest.

Have people from other generations inspired your style? Yes. My mother has been a big inspiration lately. I’ve raided her closet a few more times than I’d like to admit.

Social Media:  @AddamUp on Twitter

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Elliot Reed’s all black outfit caught my attention. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Name: Elliot Reed

Occupation: Artist, musician, part-time magician/full-time Walker employee

What are you wearing? Mesh hat, vintage jacket and shirt, skeleton pendant from somewhere in the American Southwest, modified silver chain originally from Kokorokoko Vintage, TRIPP NYC shorts (major shout out to Hot Topic circa 2005), 8-inch black leather steel toe boots.

Describe your style in 3 words. Big Black ” ____.”

Do you expect your style to speak for you? To be frank, no. I believe in the power of costume and think of my clothes as power objects in their own way. I am usually drawn to over-sized and loose pieces because they emphasize my movements and exaggerate different parts of my body.

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Donte Collins (center) with friends. Photo: Nehwoen Luogon

Name: Donte Collins

Occupation: Spoken word poet

What are you wearing? Red, black, and white newsboy hat from Wilson’s Leather, silver suit coat from H&M, red, black, and white checkered button up shirt from H&M, black belt from Wilson’s Leather, dark blue men’s jeans from Forever 21, shoes from H&M

Describe your style in three words. Music, remixed, and mine

Have people from other generations inspired your style? Yes. New York, 1920′s/1930′s. Suspenders, overalls, newsboys.

Social Media: @Donte_ThePoet on Twitter, @justdontecollins on Instagram

Party Around The Clock: Northern Spark 2014

From sundown to sunup, Northern Spark was a splash and arts lovers braved the howling winds to fill the Walker on a soggy Saturday night. With an interactive multimedia projection, poetry tarot, a roving accordion player, and the opening of two exhibitions, it was a popular place to dry off, pass the time, and grab a cup of coffee […]

Graffiti Angel in Sophronia by Joellyn Rock, Kathy McTavish, and Rob Wittig

Graffiti Angel in Sophronia by Joellyn Rock, Kathy McTavish, and Rob Wittig

From sundown to sunup, Northern Spark was a splash and arts lovers braved the howling winds to fill the Walker on a soggy Saturday night. With an interactive multimedia projection, poetry tarot, a roving accordion player, and the opening of two exhibitions, it was a popular place to dry off, pass the time, and grab a cup of coffee before heading back out into the city to explore more projects.

Office at Night tableau Old School Art School

Members of the Atelier School spent the evening sketching an Office at Night tableau for Old School Art School

Edward Hopper’s beloved Office At Night came to life for Old School Art School.

Drawing Club moved to the

Drawing Club moved to the Star Tribune Foundation Art Lab

Drawing Club moved in from Open Field and stayed low and dry tucked away in the Star Tribune Foundation Art Lab.

Graffiti Angel in Sophronia

Graffiti Angel in Sophronia

Graffiti Angel in Sophronia incorporated video, images, music, and text inspired by Italo Calvino’s imaginary city of Sophronia. Improvising on audience suggestions sent via Twitter, a team of writers wove together words to tell a story projected on the walls of Medtronic Gallery.

Ed Bok Lee reading tarot cards for Poetry Tarot

Ed Bok Lee reading tarot cards for Poetry Tarot.

Poetry tarot offered a chance to confer with a poet for a personalized poem-fortune.

People waited for their first chance to catch all 24-hours of Christian Marclay's The Clock

People waited for their first chance to catch all 24-hours of Christian Marclay’s The Clock

Some chose to pass the time with Christian Marclay’s looping, 24-hour film, The Clock.

Costumes: a Northern Spark tradition

Costumes: a Northern Spark tradition

Although the storm moved much of the action indoors, people dressed up—in their best costumes or rain gear—and went out into the evening to celebrate the vibrant and boisterous arts community that pulls together every year around Northern Spark.

Valentine’s Day with Jim Hodges and Sisyphus

On February 14, lovers of all kinds — art lovers, music lovers, museum lovers, Sufjan lovers — came out to spend Valentine’s Day at the Walker. Assembled to preview our newest exhibition, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take, guests dressed up for a photo booth, drank heart-inspired cocktails, danced to DJ sets from Olga […]

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Contemporary Arts Museum Houston Director Bill Arning, Jim Hodges, and Sisyphus (Sufjan Stevens, Serengeti, Son Lux) at the entrance to Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take. All photos by Courtney Perry.

On February 14, lovers of all kinds — art lovers, music lovers, museum lovers, Sufjan lovers — came out to spend Valentine’s Day at the Walker. Assembled to preview our newest exhibition, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take, guests dressed up for a photo booth, drank heart-inspired cocktails, danced to DJ sets from Olga Bell and Angel Deradoorian, and let loose in Gallery 8 with Sisyphus, a supergroup/side project by Sufjan Stevens, Serengeti, and Son Lux. After opening remarks from Hodges and exhibition curators Olga Viso and Jeffrey Grove, the galleries were buzzing until past midnight.

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Exhibition co-curators Jeffrey Grove of the Dallas Museum of Art and Walker Exectuive Director Olga Viso with Jim Hodges

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“How do I look?”

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Former Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak with friends in the galleries

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Trying on giant glasses for the photo booth set up in the Garden Café

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Lining up to walk through and still this, 2005–2008, an intricate work of 23.5k and 24k gold

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Getting a closer look at the glass sculpting of ghost, 2008

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Viewing their distorted reflection in Untitled, 2011, a 12-foot diameter mirror

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Getting those Instagrams and selfies

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The view through You, 1997

Gazing at the 24-foot-long denim sky that is Untitled (one day it all comes true), 2013

Gazing at the 24-foot-long denim sky that is Untitled (one day it all comes true), 2013

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Inspecting the various light bulbs of Another Turn, 1999

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Olga Bell starting the dance party before the dance party

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Son Lux and Olga Bell getting the crowd ready for Sisyphus

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Glasses on, Stevens takes the stage

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All Smiles Serengeti

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Double-shades Son Lux

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Sing-Along Stevens

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The best way to kick of Sisyphus’ new album: a maximum-capacity gallery dance party

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Things quiet down on the special-edition Valentine’s Day After Hours

Opening Night Party: Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada

On Thursday night, the multimedia exhibition Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada opened in ­the Burnet gallery. Greeted with a large map of Tangier and hand-painted film posters, guests of all ages and backgrounds were invited to explore the work of Yto Barrada. DJ/rupture aka Jace Clayton enhanced the atmosphere with unique musical selections […]

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DJ / rupture spinning Maghrebi music in Cargill Lounge.

On Thursday night, the multimedia exhibition Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada opened in ­the Burnet gallery. Greeted with a large map of Tangier and hand-painted film posters, guests of all ages and backgrounds were invited to explore the work of Yto Barrada. DJ/rupture aka Jace Clayton enhanced the atmosphere with unique musical selections and hip-hop–infused Moroccan music, accompanying attendees as they viewed the gallery.

Curator Clara Kim, aritst Yto Barrada, and film curator Sheryl Mousley

Curator Clara Kim, artist Yto Barrada, and Walker senior curator of film / video curator Sheryl Mousley

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Sign painters Forrest Wozniak and Dan Madsen in front of the map of Tangier

Opening Weekend: 9 Artists

On October 24, the much anticipated group show 9 Artists opened in the Target and Friedman galleries. The night brought with it some surprises and kicked off an extended weekend of events in and out of the Walker. Much of the excitement came in the reveal of the night’s surprise guest—Phùng Vo, father of artist […]

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Opening-night visitors in front of Natascha Sadr Haghighian’s I can’t work like this (2007). All photos by Gene Pittman

On October 24, the much anticipated group show 9 Artists opened in the Target and Friedman galleries. The night brought with it some surprises and kicked off an extended weekend of events in and out of the Walker. Much of the excitement came in the reveal of the night’s surprise guest—Phùng Vo, father of artist Danh Vo and the obvious subject of his piece Tombstone for Phùng Vo. Attendees had plenty to see, hear, and discuss amongst the wide array of installations from Vo, Yael Bartana, Liam Gillick, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Renzo Martens, Bjarne Melgaard, Nástio Mosquito, and Hito Steyerl.

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Artist Danh Vo introduces his father, Phùng Vo, in the Walker Cinema.

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Jamie Stewart of Xiu Xiu playing while Phùng Vo’s calligraphy is projected on the screen

The projection of Phùng Vo's writing during the performance

Artist Danh Vo's father Phùng Vo and family

Artist Danh Vo’s father, Phùng Vo, and family

Renzo Martens and Liam Gillick in front of a part of Gillick's installation

Artists Renzo Martens and Liam Gillick in front of Gillick’s wall text, The State Itself Becomes a Super Commune (2006)

Artists Nástio Mosquito and Vic Pereiró in the gallery

Artists Nástio Mosquito and Vic Pereiró in the gallery

Visitors inspecting the new exhibition

Visitors discovering the many facets of the exhibition

Attendees sit and watch Bjarne Melgaard's _Untitled_ (Bjarne Melgaard interviews Leo Bersani) (2011)

Attendees watching Bjarne Melgaard’s Untitled (Bjarne Melgaard interviews Leo Bersani) (2011)

Artist Marie Karlberg in the gallery

Artist Marie Karlberg in the gallery

Artist Hito Steyerl with _9 Artists_ curator Bart Ryan

Artist Hito Steyerl with 9 Artists curator Bartholomew Ryan

Danh Vo and a portion of his massive _I M U U R 2_ installation

Danh Vo and a portion of his massive I M U U R 2 installation

Museum goers inspect the contents of Danh Vo's I M U U R 2

Museum-goers inspect the contents of Danh Vo’s I M U U R 2

Hito Steyerl's _Red Alert_ (2007) glows in the middle of the gallery

Hito Steyerl’s Red Alert (2007) glows in the middle of the gallery, Bjarne Melgaard’s video interview plays in the background

Natascha Sadr Haghighian with her piece _de paso_ (2011)—with part of Liam Gillick's installation in the background

Natascha Sadr Haghighian with her piece de paso (2011)

Trying to comprehend Natascha Sadr Haghighian's with _de paso_ (2011)

Visitors observe Natascha Sadr Haghighian’s de paso (2011)

9 Artists is on view through February 16, 2014. Are you a Walker member? Make sure to come to the next installment of the ongoing series Art School: What the %#@! is Contemporary Art?; Art School: Visual Arts focuses on 9 Artists on Sunday, November 10.

Sixties Style at After Hours

The 1960s were alive and well at the Walker on a recent Saturday night as party-goers celebrated their way through giant stuffed slices of cake, fries, sliders, ice cream, and more to mark the opening of the exhibition Claes Oldenburg: The Sixties. There were rock ‘n’ rollers, groovy dudes, Twiggy-look-alikes, classy people, Mad Men enthusiasts and more. While the […]

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The 1960s were alive and well at the Walker on a recent Saturday night as party-goers celebrated their way through giant stuffed slices of cake, fries, sliders, ice cream, and more to mark the opening of the exhibition Claes Oldenburg: The Sixties.

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Claes Oldenburg’s Floor Cake (1962)

Nicola Carpenter and Sean Donovan

Nicola Carpenter and Sean Donovan

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Mini-burgers and mock duck sliders

Kelsey Simpkins, Autumn Kovach, and all-you-can-eat Häagen-Dazs

There were rock ‘n’ rollers, groovy dudes, Twiggy-look-alikes, classy people, Mad Men enthusiasts and more.

Neal Tillotson and Gwyneth Dwyer

Neal Tillotson and Gwyneth Dwyer

Kevin Kirsch and Xena Huff

Kevin Kirsch and Xena Huff

Katy Corbin and DJ Nelson

Katy Corbin and DJ Nelson

Dan Jensen, Kevin Kunz, and Sandy Simmons

Shelly Ebnet and Emerson Gutierrez

Shelly Ebnet and Emerson Gutierrez

While the Anonymous Choir and the Ventures Cover Band gave a riveting live show of 60s soul music in the McGuire Theater, other revelers amped up the theme in the photo booth with psychedelic and oversized props, and the craftiest of guests sewed together clever stuffed protest signs out of burlap à la Oldenburg.

Anonymous Choir with the Ventures Cover Band

Anonymous Choir with the Ventures Cover Band

Karly Knutson, Ellora Parrington, and Leslie Olson show off their handiwork

Karly Knutson, Ellora Parrington, and Leslie Olson show off their handiwork

Twin Cities Photo Booth

Twin Cities Photo Booth

Jim Hodges in Dallas: Walker Co-curated Exhibition Opens at DMA

More than three years in the making, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take opens October 6 at the Dallas Museum of Art. Co-curated by Walker executive director Olga Viso and Jeffrey Grove, DMA’s senior curator of special projects and research, the exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of Hodges’ work in the United States. Viso, […]

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Olga Viso, Jim Hodges, Jeffrey Grove at the Dallas Museum of Art. All photos courtesy Olga Viso

More than three years in the making, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take opens October 6 at the Dallas Museum of Art. Co-curated by Walker executive director Olga Viso and Jeffrey Grove, DMA’s senior curator of special projects and research, the exhibition is the first comprehensive survey of Hodges’ work in the United States. Viso, who’s in Dallas to oversee installation of the show and attend the opening, sent these photos of the preparations.

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Jim Hodges installing You (1997), a scrim made of silk, polyester, cotton, and thread

Hodges should be familiar to Walker visitors: his steel-clad boulders offer a gleaming companion to James Turrell’s skyspace on the Walker hillside; his film Untitled (created as an homage to his friend, artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, who died from AIDS complications in 1996) screened at the Walker for World AIDS Day 2011; and several of his works are in the Walker’s permanent collection.

Groves with Hodges mirror piece Movements (Stage 1)

Grove with Hodges’ 2005 mirror piece Movements (Stage 1)

Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take comes to the Walker in February before touring to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston  (June 3–September 1, 2014) and the UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (October 5, 2014–January 2015). A Walker-designed catalogue — featuring an essay by Viso — has been published to coincide with the Dallas opening and will be available at tour venues and in the Walker Shop.

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Olga Viso and Jeffrey Grove speak at the exhibition preview

Jim Hodges' Untitled (2001) with ghost (2008)

Jim Hodges’ Untitled (2001) with ghost (2008)

Opening Night: Fritz Haeg’s At Home in the City

Last Thursday was abuzz for the opening of Fritz Haeg: At Home in the City, which saw the gathering of local food producers, artists, and enthusiasts of all things made in the home, garden, and museum. The exhibition is the most comprehensive display to-date of Haeg’s Domestic Ingtegrities A05 which contains the recently expanded crocheted rug, an archive […]

Last Thursday was abuzz for the opening of Fritz Haeg: At Home in the City, which saw the gathering of local food producers, artists, and enthusiasts of all things made in the home, garden, and museum.

Fritz Haeg (left) with Walker assistant curator, Eric Crosby

Artist Fritz Haeg (left) with Walker Assistant Curator Eric Crosby. All photos by Gene Pittman.

The exhibition is the most comprehensive display to-date of Haeg’s Domestic Ingtegrities A05 which contains the recently expanded crocheted rug, an archive of preserved food and processed organic material from other sites where Haeg has worked, a work space in which to prepare things coming into the gallery from the outdoors, and a giant wall-sized map of the Twin Cities metro area where visitors can locate community gardens, co-ops, CSAs, and their front or backyard gardens.

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The night presented an opportunity to recognize our community partners who are working to expand the Twin Cities’ ability to grow, process, distribute, eat, and compost more healthy, sustainable, locally grown (or foraged) foods. Jane Shey, Coordinating Consultant for Homegrown Minneapolis and Ginger Cannon, Outreach and Research Planner at the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board gave opening remarks before the premiere of the Edible Estate #15 documentary.

Jane Shey (left), Coordinating Consultant to Homegrown Minneapolis Sustainability and Ginger Cannon, Outreach and Research Planner Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board

Jane Shey (left) and Ginger Cannon

A key concept guiding the project is the interconnectedness between the wild, the garden, and the home. The opening event intentionally drew a line between the Foraging Circle, Haeg’s recently commissioned work in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden and the domestic realm of the exhibition, with the help of Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad of BodyCartography Project. Together with a team of 9 dancers, they artfully led a procession of plants from the Foraging Circle into the gallery and delivered bread and spreads from the exhibition outside to the Foraging Circle with some unexpected moves along the way.

Intern Will Gobeli preparing plants for dancer ??

An exchange of plants between dancer Joan Mathews and intern Will Gobeli

Dancers from left to right: ?,?,?, Otto Ramstad, and ?

Dancers from left to right: Emma Buechs, Joan Mathews, Amy Jones, Otto Ramstad, and Hannah Geil-Neufeld

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Interns Brett Baldauf and Bridget Mendel were on hand to serve the breads and spreads made by Birchwood Cafe while Verdant Tea‘s Brandon Lovejoy handed out cups of his delicious tea infusion concoction. Ingredients for the spreads and infusions reflected the plants growing in Edible Estate #15 and Foraging Circle.

Intern Brett Baldauf slices fresh bread in the Foraging Circle.

Brett Baldauf (left) slicing bread for the garden party

Brandon Lovejoy of Verdant Tea, left.

Brandon Lovejoy of Verdant Tea

Intern Bridget Mendel serving breads and spreads.

Bridget Mendel and the other interns wore crowns made from flowers in the Foraging Circle

Fritz Haeg and Tracy Singleton, owner of Birchwood Cafe

Fritz Haeg with Birchwood Cafe owner, Tracy Singleton

Fritz reunited with his friends and fellow Angeleno artists, Mark Allen and Emily Joyce outside the Foraging Circle. Allen and his organization Machine Project were the 2011 Open Field artists-in-residence.

From left to right: Mark Allen of Machine Project, Haeg, and artist Emily Joyce

Mark Allen, Fritz Haeg, and Emily Joyce

The Schoenherr family and proud owners of Edible Estate #15 were all smiles. They were the stars of the evening, as was their beautiful cabbage that was prominently displayed at the center of the rug for opening night.

Fritz Haeg with the Schoenherr family: John, Catherine, Andrea, and Aaron

Fritz Haeg with John, Catherine, Andrea, and Aaron Schoenherr

Celebrating Out There 25

Old friends from the Minneapolis theater/performance art scene were reunited on Thursday in celebration of Out There’s 25th Anniversary. A photo slideshow highlighted performances throughout the years (you can see it here) as people shared their favorite Out There memories and hopes for the future on a Post-It wall, while a photo booth allowed guests […]

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Old friends from the Minneapolis theater/performance art scene were reunited on Thursday in celebration of Out There’s 25th Anniversary. A photo slideshow highlighted performances throughout the years (you can see it here) as people shared their favorite Out There memories and hopes for the future on a Post-It wall, while a photo booth allowed guests to get wacky with iconic props from past Out There performances—umbrellas from Big Dance Theater’s Another Telepathic Thing and American flags from The TEAM’s Particularly in the Heartland were popular choices. (more…)

Demystifying Development Department Duties: Cindy Sherman Party Planning

“Your job must be so fun! We always see you at parties.” As development associates for the Walker, my colleague Kate Tucker and I hear various iterations of the above comment on a regular basis — from friends, family, potential new hires, and Walker members. It’s true, we do have fun. And we work diligently […]

“Your job must be so fun! We always see you at parties.”

As development associates for the Walker, my colleague Kate Tucker and I hear various iterations of the above comment on a regular basis — from friends, family, potential new hires, and Walker members. It’s true, we do have fun. And we work diligently to organize fun events!

In addition to fundraising for the museum, the membership and development department plans more than 75 events every year specifically for Walker members, donors, and sponsors, like Friday’s After Hours opening for the Cindy Sherman exhibition. (more…)

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