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Cinefile: From the Coasts to The Clock

Linda Blackaby,  Sheryl Mousley, and Marian Marone at Christian Marclay: The Clock
Marian Masone, Sheryl Mousley, and Linda Blackaby at Christian Marclay: The Clock

Linda Blackaby, Sheryl Mousley, and Marian Masone at Christian Marclay: The Clock

In advance of the final 24-hour screening of The Clock (August 23–24: Saturday, 11 am–Sunday, 5 pm), I caught up with two special visitors from the last 24-hour screening. I’m on my own quest to see all 24 hours, so I wanted to get some thoughts and tips from two professional film-watchers who ended up fitting in 13 hours in just a couple of days!

Marian Masone and Linda Blackaby are used to watching films—Masone is Senior Programming Advisor at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, while Blackaby is Director of Cinema Projects and consults on film festival programming around the country. But watching The Clock was a new and unique experience, one that brought them from the coasts to meet in the middle at the Walker Art Center.

Both enjoyed the excuse to come to Minneapolis, and to the Walker specifically to see their friend and colleague, Walker Senior Film/Video Curator  Sheryl Mousley. While they didn’t have the chance to sightsee (“Sorry, the rest of town,” said Masone, “we were there to see The Clock and that’s what we did.”), Masone said that crossing the Mississippi River at least twice a day was a highlight of her trip.

Altogether, the pair watched 13 hours of The Clock over the course of the weekend. (Blackaby noted that a cup of coffee at 2 am would have got them a few more hours.) Though it showed in their hometowns (at the Lincoln Center Festival and MoMA in New York and at SFMOMA), “it’s difficult to incorporate something like this into your daily busy life, so it made sense to do it as an excursion,” said Blackaby, noting that they travel to see films at festivals professionally, “so it fit into that model.”

I wanted to learn how these cinephiles, who have had experiences with “durational” pieces like SATANTANGO and The Coast of Utopia, watched The Clock. For both Blackaby and Masone, it was less about the specific clips selected and more about how the editing created rhythms and moods, and showed a wide span of cinematic styles over time.

One thing I’ve noticed about The Clock is its consistent state of narrative tension—Marclay uses sound and editing to build things up, but there is no chance for true resolution. Masone said that “it’s actually kind of a gas to get all excited, or scared, or… something, and then: poof! We’re at the top of the hour and things start to shift.”

Masone’s “big question” for Marclay would be if he considered any part of the 24 hours to be the beginning—or the end. “If there is none of those, then of course there is no climax! Very cool.”

For Blackaby, “the whole experience was really a lot of fun—I wish The Clock were running here now so I could pop in and revisit it.”

Cinefile: Dear White People Advance Screening

The Walker’s advance screening of Dear White People on May 2 gathered both young and old, budding filmmakers and artists, as well as the public and those intimately involved with creating the movie. Filmed at the University of Minnesota, Dear White People garnered praise at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival for its satirical portrait of […]

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Raslyn Wooten, wardrobe stylist for Dear White People, captured the hip look of college students with a nostalgic feel through Peter Pan collars and cardigan sweaters. Robb Kelly, makeup artist, created a flawless vision with her brush. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

The Walker’s advance screening of Dear White People on May 2 gathered both young and old, budding filmmakers and artists, as well as the public and those intimately involved with creating the movie. Filmed at the University of Minnesota, Dear White People garnered praise at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival for its satirical portrait of race and identity in contemporary America. We met some of the many who showed up to see this important film, which opens to wide release in fall 2014.

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James Clinton Francis, Mali D. Collins, and Elliot Smith awaited with anticipation. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Armin Habibovich, Cheri Anderson, Lucinda Winter, and Jahbo Hughes. Winter, executive director of the Minnesota Film and TV Board, helped support this Twin Cities–shot film, while Hughes worked production for the film, mostly focusing on props and setting, to create the fresh look and tone of Dear White People. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Mina Adani, Natalie Clifford, and Lucreshia Grant. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Noah Anderson and Megan Rock made the film a stop on date night. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Allison Osberg was waiting for a friend right before the show. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Shannon Evans, Tamiya Smith, and Brianna Wilson just met, but they were happy to take a picture together. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Andrew Harrison, Norah Shapiro, and Jeremy Wilker. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Katie Gaulke, who plays Annie in the film, got into acting because her father was an actor. Her background is in web development, but she ultimately decided to pursue acting full-time. Photo: Emylisa Warrick

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Walker Film/Video Curator Sheryl Mousley and Sundance Film Festival Director John Cooper introduce Dear White People. Photo: Gene Pittman

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Dear White People director Justin Simien, at right, introduces producer Effie Brown and actors Tessa Thompson and Tyler James Williams. Photo: Gene Pittman

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