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Artists on Site: Alison Klayman with Olga Viso

After winning accolades and racking up awards, including Sundance’s Special Jury Prize for Spirit of Defiance, for her documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, filmmaker Alison Klayman is directing her attention to another fiercely independent artist: Carmen Herrera. Born in Cuba in 1915 but long a resident of New York City, Herrera has been painting for […]

Alison Klayman and Olga Viso. Photo: Paul Schemlzer

Alison Klayman and Olga Viso. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

After winning accolades and racking up awards, including Sundance’s Special Jury Prize for Spirit of Defiance, for her documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, filmmaker Alison Klayman is directing her attention to another fiercely independent artist: Carmen Herrera. Born in Cuba in 1915 but long a resident of New York City, Herrera has been painting for more than seven decades, six of which were in near total obscurity. It was only in 2004, at age 89, that Herrera sold her first painting. That was when her work started selling swiftly. It was “very pleasant to be recognized a little bit,” she told The Guardian a few years ago. “I’ve made it on to the cover of the New York Times without ­having to kill anyone. All I had to do was get old. The world came to me ­eventually – I just had to wait 94 years, that’s all.” Today her geometric paintings are in collections worldwide, including the Walker’s.

Last week, Klayman dropped by the Walker to conduct an on-camera interview with Walker Executive Director Olga Viso on Herrera’s work and legacy for her upcoming film, Carmen Herrera: The 100 Years Show, scheduled for release to coincide with the artist’s 100th birthday on May 31. In 2010, Viso acquired four works by Herrera for the Walker’s collection: a series of three gouache paintings on paper from 1966 and a rare sculptural work from 1971, which will be on view in the Walker’s upcoming 75th-anniversary exhibition, Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections.

Carmen Herrera, Untitled, 1971

Carmen Herrera, Untitled, 1971

 

Artists Installing: Jim Hodges

American sculptor Jim Hodges spent the past week in the galleries installing his delicate, poetic, and often colorful artworks for his mid-career retrospective, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take. With materials ranging from glass, mirrors, denim, silk, chains, and restaurant napkins, the exhibition—which opens Saturday—engages viewers’ every sense. Visitors get a first chance to preview […]

Jim Hodges installing in gallery 1. All photos by Gene Pittman.

Jim Hodges installing in Gallery 1. All photos by Gene Pittman

American sculptor Jim Hodges spent the past week in the galleries installing his delicate, poetic, and often colorful artworks for his mid-career retrospective, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take. With materials ranging from glass, mirrors, denim, silk, chains, and restaurant napkins, the exhibition—which opens Saturday—engages viewers’ every sense. Visitors get a first chance to preview the exhibition during the special Valentine’s Day After Hours.

Hodges inspecting one of the blown glass bells that make up Untitled (bells), 2002.

Hodges inspecting one of the blown glass bells that make up Untitled (bells), 2002.

It takes many hands—and two ladders—to install this mirror mosaic piece, Untitled, 2011.

It takes many hands—and two ladders—to install this mirror mosaic piece, Untitled, 2011.

Hodges and Olga Viso, cocurator and Walker Executive Director, watching as Here's Where where we will stay, 1995 is lifted into place.

Hodges and Olga Viso, exhibition co-curator and Walker executive director, watch as Here’s where where we will stay, 1995 is lifted into place.

 

Theater HORA in Minneapolis

Ten actors from Zürich-based Theater HORA came to Minneapolis in November to perform Jérôme Bel’s Disabled Theater at the Walker. They were excited to visit the Twin Cities after performing a seven-show run of Disabled Theater in New York City. When not rehearsing and performing at the Walker, they went shopping and bowling and had the chance […]

Ten actors from Zürich-based Theater HORA came to Minneapolis in November to perform Jérôme Bel’s Disabled Theater at the Walker. They were excited to visit the Twin Cities after performing a seven-show run of Disabled Theater in New York City. When not rehearsing and performing at the Walker, they went shopping and bowling and had the chance to meet some of the artists at Interact Center, a visual and performing arts organization for people with disabilities in the Twin Cities. The photos below are also on the Theater HORA blog, where they shared some of their observations and reflections (in Swiss German!) from their time in America.

Green room

The Theater HORA company with Jérôme Bel in the Walker green room after a performance. All photos by Cornelia Marinucci.

Art studios

Sara, Miranda, and Tiziana from Theater HORA at the Interact Center art studios.

Interact

Theater HORA actors with members of the Interact theater company.

Art studios

Theater HORA at the visual arts studios at Interact.

Bowling

In their free time, the Theater HORA company went bowling at Elsie’s.

Backstage

Theater HORA’s autographs on the signature wall, backstage at the Walker.

 

Opening Night Party: Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada

On Thursday night, the multimedia exhibition Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada opened in ­the Burnet gallery. Greeted with a large map of Tangier and hand-painted film posters, guests of all ages and backgrounds were invited to explore the work of Yto Barrada. DJ/rupture aka Jace Clayton enhanced the atmosphere with unique musical selections […]

Cinematheque Tangier

DJ / rupture spinning Maghrebi music in Cargill Lounge.

On Thursday night, the multimedia exhibition Album: Cinematheque Tangier, a project by Yto Barrada opened in ­the Burnet gallery. Greeted with a large map of Tangier and hand-painted film posters, guests of all ages and backgrounds were invited to explore the work of Yto Barrada. DJ/rupture aka Jace Clayton enhanced the atmosphere with unique musical selections and hip-hop–infused Moroccan music, accompanying attendees as they viewed the gallery.

Curator Clara Kim, aritst Yto Barrada, and film curator Sheryl Mousley

Curator Clara Kim, artist Yto Barrada, and Walker senior curator of film / video curator Sheryl Mousley

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Cinematheque Tangier

Sign painters Forrest Wozniak and Dan Madsen in front of the map of Tangier

Jérôme Bel Roundtable Lunch

Today over the lunch hour, Walker staff from all departments, along with artist-in-residence Fritz Haeg, Lucky Dragons, and J. Morgan Puett (who performed at the Walker last night) had a conversation with Jérôme Bel. Bel is in town for Disabled Theater, a collaboration with Theater HORA. This wide-ranging conversation, full of humor, stories, and “mistakes were made” confessions from Bel, […]

Today over the lunch hour, Walker staff from all departments, along with artist-in-residence Fritz HaegLucky Dragons, and J. Morgan Puett (who performed at the Walker last night) had a conversation with Jérôme Bel. Bel is in town for Disabled Theater, a collaboration with Theater HORA.

Performing Arts Curator Philip Bither, Jérôme Bel, Director of Education and Curator of Public Practice Sarah Schultz, and Executive Director Olga Viso

Performing Arts Curator Philip Bither, Jérôme Bel, Director of Education and Curator of Public Practice Sarah Schultz, and Executive Director Olga Viso

This wide-ranging conversation, full of humor, stories, and “mistakes were made” confessions from Bel, explored some of these questions—questions that are often top-of-mind at an interdisciplinary institution like the Walker:

  • Why use theater as a platform, when there are so many other forms of expression? What is so attractive about the “black box,” the lights going down, and people taking their seats?
  • How do visual arts folks experience theater differently than those grounded in the world of performance?
  • How can you collect dance, when it is so closely connected to the body of the dancer? And what happens when collectors want to own it, and monetize it?
  • Is bringing the performing arts into the museum gallery context just a trend?

Towards the end of the conversation, Viso remarked that, instead of trying to translate his existing work into the “white cube” of the museum,  perhaps the real question is “What can Bel produce within the context of the white cube?” After seeing his works in the theater and spending time him this afternoon, I’m fascinated to know how he might answer that question.

Steve McQueen Reception: The End of a Retrospective

Artists, filmmakers, producers, and art patrons turned out for a reception at the Walker following Steve McQueen’s dialogue with Museum of Modern Art curator Stuart Comer on November 9. The dialogue and reception marked the end of the Walker’s Steve McQueen retrospective, which also included the regional premier of McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave as well […]

Walker senior curator of film/video Sheryl Mousley, artist and filmmaker Steve McQueen, MoMA chief curator of media and performance Stuart Comer, 12 Years a Slave producer Bill Pohlad, and Walker executive director Olga Viso

Walker senior curator of film/video Sheryl Mousley, artist/filmmaker Steve McQueen, MoMA chief curator of media and performance Stuart Comer, 12 Years a Slave producer Bill Pohlad, and Walker executive director Olga Viso

Artists, filmmakers, producers, and art patrons turned out for a reception at the Walker following Steve McQueen’s dialogue with Museum of Modern Art curator Stuart Comer on November 9. The dialogue and reception marked the end of the Walker’s Steve McQueen retrospective, which also included the regional premier of McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave as well as screenings of two of his earlier films, Shame and Hunger. In addition to McQueen and Comer, VIPs in attendance included Olga Viso, Sheryl Mousley, Bill Pohlad, Hamza Walker, Nate Young, and Robert Byrd. Walker photographer Gene Pittman was there to document the event.

Steve McQueen talks with artist Nate Young

Steve McQueen talks with artist Nate Young

Sheryl Mousley with Stuart Comer, chief curator of media and performance at the Museum of Modern Art. Mousley curated Steve McQueen: A Dialogue and Retrospective at the Walker, and Comer facilitated the dialogue with McQueen about his creative process and influences.

Sheryl Mousley with Stuart Comer. Mousley curated Steve McQueen: A Dialogue and Retrospective at the Walker, and Comer facilitated the dialogue with McQueen about his creative process and influences.

Martine d’Anglejan-Chatillon, partner at the Thomas Dane Gallery, and TBD

Martine d’Anglejan-Chatillon, partner at the Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Pamela Kramlich, member of the Walker’s National Advisory Board

Bill Pohlad and Hamza Walker. Pohlad was one of the producers of 12 Years a Slave, and Walker is associate curator at the University of Chicago's Renaissance Society.

Bill Pohlad and Hamza Walker. Pohlad was one of the producers of 12 Years a Slave, and Walker is associate curator at the University of Chicago’s Renaissance Society.

Artist Broc Blegen, "Third Rail" editor Jonathan Thomas, and photographer and MCAD professor David Goldies

Artist Broc Blegen, Third Rail editor Jonathan Thomas, and photographer and MCAD professor David Goldes

Clara Kim, Walker senior curator of visual arts, with Dean Otto, Walker assistant curator of film/video and program manager.

Clara Kim, Walker senior curator of visual arts, with Dean Otto, Walker assistant curator of film/video and program manager

Walker development director Christopher Stevens and Twin’s CEO Jim Pohlad.

Walker development director Christopher Stevens with Karen and Ken Heithoff

12 Years a Slave producer Bill Pohlad and Michelle Pohlad

Bill and Michelle Pohlad

Artist and filmmaker Steve McQueen with Robert Byrd, program director for the Jerome Foundation, which provides grants for nonprofit arts organizations and artists in Minnesota and New York City.

McQueen with Robert Byrd, program director for the Jerome Foundation, which provides grants for nonprofit arts organizations and artists in Minnesota and New York City

 

Artists Installing: 9 Artists

The Target and Friedman galleries have been full this past week as artists, their teams, and Walker staff prepare for the group show that is 9 Artists. Fortunately for attendees, the artists won’t be leaving once the show debuts tonight. The opening is only the beginning of a weekend of engaging talks and performances—one relying […]

Danh Vo installing his portion of the group exhibition9 Artists. Photo: Gene Pittman

Danh Vo installing his portion of the group exhibition 9 Artists. All photos by Gene Pittman

The Target and Friedman galleries have been full this past week as artists, their teams, and Walker staff prepare for the group show that is 9 Artists. Fortunately for attendees, the artists won’t be leaving once the show debuts tonight. The opening is only the beginning of a weekend of engaging talks and performances—one relying on audience participation. Renzo Martens already gave a lecture on gentrification, but the rest of the group—Bjarne Melgaard, Liam Gillick, Hito Steyerl, Danh Vo, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, and Nástio Mosquito—will be presenting in some fashion on October 24, 25, and 26. Walker photographer Gene Pittman captured these glimpses into the installation process of this international, multigenerational show.

Artist Peter Broda at the beginning of the installation process. Photo: Gene Pittman

Peter Broda, artist and friend of Danh Vo, at the beginning of a long process

Danh Vo getting some installation help from Peter Broda. Photo: Gene Pittman

Danh Vo getting some installation help from Peter Broda

Natascha Sadr Haghighian (center) discussing her installation with Curator Bartholomew Ryan and Curatorial Fellow Mia Lopez. Photo: Gene Pittman

Natascha Sadr Haghighian (center) discussing her installation with curator Bart Ryan and curatorial fellow Mia Lopez

Danh Vo looking over his sculpture _Tombstone for Phùng Vo_ (2010), with Exhibition Technician Doc Czypinski. Photo: Gene Pittman

Danh Vo looking over his sculpture Tombstone for Phùng Vo (2010), with exhibition technician Doc Czypinski

Photo: Gene Pittman

Artist Marie Karlberg, Tim Smith of Artist Resources Management, and the photographer Johannes Worsøe Berg watching Karlberg’s video after it was installed in the Bjarne Melgaard installation for the first time.

 

Artists Danh Vo and Liam Gillick look over the space while curator Bart Ryan takes a much needed sit. Photo: Gene Pittman

Artists Danh Vo and Liam Gillick look over the space while curator Bart Ryan takes a much needed sit

Liam Gillick putting on some finishing touches. Photo: Gene Pittman

Liam Gillick putting on some finishing touches

The Visitors: The People of Avant Garden

Roger Cummings, artist and cofounder of Juxtaposition Arts The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden was transformed the evening of September 21 for a spectacular gala. A colossal tent, with a stunning view of Spoonbridge and Cherry, welcomed dignitaries, artists, and art fans, from Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak to artists Claes Oldenburg and Kris Martin to members of […]

roger cummings
Roger Cummings, artist and cofounder of Juxtaposition Arts

The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden was transformed the evening of September 21 for a spectacular gala. A colossal tent, with a stunning view of Spoonbridge and Cherry, welcomed dignitaries, artists, and art fans, from Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak to artists Claes Oldenburg and Kris Martin to members of the Walker’s staff and board. Here’s a look at the faces and fashions of Avant Garden 2013.

pohlads kris martin
Jim and Donna Pohlad, Elizabeth Redleaf, and artist Kris Martin

megan rt rybak
Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak and wife Megan

muffy macmillan
Muffy MacMillan, with Donna Pohlad (left) and Lisa Denzer (rear, left)

Lauren Shadford Executive Director of INCCA-NA and phillips auction
Lauren Shadford, INCCA-NA’s executive director and a Phillips auctioneer

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Artist Anne Labovitz and Crystal Taylor

brendan bujold spencer cronk
Brendan Bujold and Spencer Cronk, Commissioner of the Department of Administration

brian woolsey andrew webis rob curran

Rob Curran, Andrew Webb, Brian Woolsey

carol-bemis-Avant-Garden-Committee-Member-siri-engberg-curator-of-visual-arts-at-the-Walker-Art-Center-
Avant Garden Committee member Carol Bemis and Walker visual art curator Siri Engberg

caspar laurie
Laurie and Caspar Borggreve

chris dahl deb hopp laura john taft
Kit Dahl; Deb Hopp, vice president of MSP Communications; Laura Taft, and John Taft, CEO at RBC Wealth Management

dawn hillins vicki graves
Dawn Hillins and Vicki Graves

donna pohlad and muffy macmillan
Donna Pohlad and Muffy MacMillan

emma kris
Designer and Avant Garden Committee member Emma Berg and Kristoffer Knutson

Frank vascellero marne brooks
WCCO-TV’s Frank Vascellaro and Marne Brooks

jahna
Stylist Jahna Peloquin in an Emma Berg dress and necklace by Stephanie Lake

jim fehrenbach david sunberg
Jim Fehrenbach, Piper Jaffray’s managing director, and David Sunberg

joe gibbons john stout
Joe Gibbons, a senior financial advisor at Merrill Lynch, with Fredrikson & Byron attorney John Stout

peter remes annie remes elizabeth redleaf
Peter and Annie Remes with Elizabeth Redleaf

kati lovaas
Art Advisor Kati Lovaas

Kern, Amy – Avant Garden Committee and Board

Avant Garden Gold Key Co-Chairs Wim Stocks and Amy Kern

medora erin
Blu Dot VP Medora Danz with wife Farrell

robert elder katie jones
Robert Elder and Katie Jones

sandy simmons kevin coonz david craigg erin herney
Sandy Simmons, Kevin Kunz, David Craigg, and Erin Herney

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Stephanie Prem, director of Abbot Downing

todd pinzuti todd walker
Bungalow 6 Design owner Todd Pinzuti and FOX-9 reporter Todd Walker

Weiser, Marge and Irv – Board Member
Irv and Marge Weiser

Opening Night: Fritz Haeg’s At Home in the City

Last Thursday was abuzz for the opening of Fritz Haeg: At Home in the City, which saw the gathering of local food producers, artists, and enthusiasts of all things made in the home, garden, and museum. The exhibition is the most comprehensive display to-date of Haeg’s Domestic Ingtegrities A05 which contains the recently expanded crocheted rug, an archive […]

Last Thursday was abuzz for the opening of Fritz Haeg: At Home in the City, which saw the gathering of local food producers, artists, and enthusiasts of all things made in the home, garden, and museum.

Fritz Haeg (left) with Walker assistant curator, Eric Crosby

Artist Fritz Haeg (left) with Walker Assistant Curator Eric Crosby. All photos by Gene Pittman.

The exhibition is the most comprehensive display to-date of Haeg’s Domestic Ingtegrities A05 which contains the recently expanded crocheted rug, an archive of preserved food and processed organic material from other sites where Haeg has worked, a work space in which to prepare things coming into the gallery from the outdoors, and a giant wall-sized map of the Twin Cities metro area where visitors can locate community gardens, co-ops, CSAs, and their front or backyard gardens.

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The night presented an opportunity to recognize our community partners who are working to expand the Twin Cities’ ability to grow, process, distribute, eat, and compost more healthy, sustainable, locally grown (or foraged) foods. Jane Shey, Coordinating Consultant for Homegrown Minneapolis and Ginger Cannon, Outreach and Research Planner at the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board gave opening remarks before the premiere of the Edible Estate #15 documentary.

Jane Shey (left), Coordinating Consultant to Homegrown Minneapolis Sustainability and Ginger Cannon, Outreach and Research Planner Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board

Jane Shey (left) and Ginger Cannon

A key concept guiding the project is the interconnectedness between the wild, the garden, and the home. The opening event intentionally drew a line between the Foraging Circle, Haeg’s recently commissioned work in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden and the domestic realm of the exhibition, with the help of Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad of BodyCartography Project. Together with a team of 9 dancers, they artfully led a procession of plants from the Foraging Circle into the gallery and delivered bread and spreads from the exhibition outside to the Foraging Circle with some unexpected moves along the way.

Intern Will Gobeli preparing plants for dancer ??

An exchange of plants between dancer Joan Mathews and intern Will Gobeli

Dancers from left to right: ?,?,?, Otto Ramstad, and ?

Dancers from left to right: Emma Buechs, Joan Mathews, Amy Jones, Otto Ramstad, and Hannah Geil-Neufeld

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Interns Brett Baldauf and Bridget Mendel were on hand to serve the breads and spreads made by Birchwood Cafe while Verdant Tea‘s Brandon Lovejoy handed out cups of his delicious tea infusion concoction. Ingredients for the spreads and infusions reflected the plants growing in Edible Estate #15 and Foraging Circle.

Intern Brett Baldauf slices fresh bread in the Foraging Circle.

Brett Baldauf (left) slicing bread for the garden party

Brandon Lovejoy of Verdant Tea, left.

Brandon Lovejoy of Verdant Tea

Intern Bridget Mendel serving breads and spreads.

Bridget Mendel and the other interns wore crowns made from flowers in the Foraging Circle

Fritz Haeg and Tracy Singleton, owner of Birchwood Cafe

Fritz Haeg with Birchwood Cafe owner, Tracy Singleton

Fritz reunited with his friends and fellow Angeleno artists, Mark Allen and Emily Joyce outside the Foraging Circle. Allen and his organization Machine Project were the 2011 Open Field artists-in-residence.

From left to right: Mark Allen of Machine Project, Haeg, and artist Emily Joyce

Mark Allen, Fritz Haeg, and Emily Joyce

The Schoenherr family and proud owners of Edible Estate #15 were all smiles. They were the stars of the evening, as was their beautiful cabbage that was prominently displayed at the center of the rug for opening night.

Fritz Haeg with the Schoenherr family: John, Catherine, Andrea, and Aaron

Fritz Haeg with John, Catherine, Andrea, and Aaron Schoenherr

Filmmaker on Site: Joshua Oppenheimer with The Act of Killing

Last week, Copenhagen-based filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer wrapped up his tour of the United States with screenings of The Act of Killing at the Walker. In addition showing the theatrical release (now playing at the Lagoon Cinema), he screened the full director’s cut, and held a Master Class on Saturday in the Walker Cinema. The Act […]

Oppenheimer discussing The Act of Killing during the Master Class.

Oppenheimer discussing The Act of Killing during the Master Class

Last week, Copenhagen-based filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer wrapped up his tour of the United States with screenings of The Act of Killing at the Walker. In addition showing the theatrical release (now playing at the Lagoon Cinema), he screened the full director’s cut, and held a Master Class on Saturday in the Walker Cinema.

The Act of Killing has been winning awards on the festival circuit and getting rave reviews from the New York Times, New York Magazine, and from filmmakers Werner Herzog and Errol Morris — who, immediately after viewing an early version of the film, signed on to be executive producers.

Attendees of the Master Class heard Oppenheimer talk about his next film — coming next year — which is drawn from Oppenheimer’s experiences making The Act of Killing. Footage from the new film — about a family who confronts those involved with their son’s death in 1965–66 massacres in Indonesia — will be drawn from the same 1,200 hours that made up The Act of Killing, as it is unsafe for Oppenheimer to travel back to Indonesia.

Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer, introduced by Sheryl Mousley (Senior Curator, Film/Video)

Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer, introduced by Sheryl Mousley (Senior Curator, Film/Video)

Film/Video Senior Curator Sheryl Mousley saw The Act of Killing when it debuted at the Telluride Film Festival almost a year ago and immediately knew she wanted to bring it, and Oppenheimer, to the Walker. (Executive director Olga Viso also saw the Telluride screening, dubbing The Act of Killing one of the top cultural moments of 2012.)

One of Oppenheimer’s biggest highlights from his visit? Witnessing the joyful celebrations of marriage equality as the first same-sex couples got married in Minneapolis on August 1.

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