Blogs Walker Seen Samantha Sacks

Samantha Sacks is a Marketing & Public Relations Intern for Walker Art Center, a Student at the University of Minnesota's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and an Amateur Printmaker.

Cherry PhotoBomb

Here at the Walker we have been noticing some really funny, creative photos on social media that visitors take with the artwork. From posing in front of favorite paintings to selfies in reflective surfaces, one variation of photo we see again and again features Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s 1988 sculpture, Spoonbridge and Cherry in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Some pretend […]

Here at the Walker we have been noticing some really funny, creative photos on social media that visitors take with the artwork. From posing in front of favorite paintings to selfies in reflective surfaces, one variation of photo we see again and again features Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen’s 1988 sculpture, Spoonbridge and Cherry in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Some pretend to hold the cherry by its stem, some pretend to hold the spoon, and many pretend to eat the cherry. It seems to have become Minneapolis’s own Tower of Pisa meme.

If you want to post your own creative photo with Spoonbridge and Cherry on social media, use the hashtag, #SpoonCherry. We have been posting some of our favorite examples on our Pinterest board, which you can visit to get some inspiration for your own photos.

Here are ten of our favorite ideas for creating your own #SpoonCherry pic!

1. “The Lovin’ Spoonful”

Directions: Use one hand to hold the spoon and open wide.

 

2. “Cherry Yummy”

Directions: This one is pretty #selfie friendly; just open your mouth and position yourself so it looks like you’re about the eat the cherry.

<cherry_tasting > #SpoonBridgeAndCherry

A photo posted by | | (@njoymentminster) on

 

3. “Cherry Picker”

Directions: Use one hand to hold the stem of the cherry.

#Spoonbridge & Cherry Sculpture #minneapolis

A photo posted by @travelqueen on

 

4. “Born with a Silver Spoon”

Directions: Use one or both hands to hold the end of the spoon.

#picoftheday #spoonbridgeandcherry #Minneapolis #art #Minnesota #twincities #fall #vacation

A photo posted by Gio de Gracia (@giodegracia) on

 

5. “A Cherry Good Time”

Directions: Make your best jump!

https://instagram.com/p/vfLpDysTzX

 

6. “Pretty Please, with a Cherry on Top”

Directions: This one is another #selfie friendly option. Position yourself so the cherry appears on top of your head.

 

7. “Cherry PhotoBomb”

Directions: Hold the stem of the cherry with one hand, and open wide!

 

8. “Spoonful of Cherry”

Directions: This one’s easy; from a distance, hold the spoon with your hand.

Damn it! My spoon fell in the pond :/ #minneapolis #spoonbridge

A photo posted by Paul Chaca (@chacaflockaflame) on

 

9. “Cherry Grab”

Directions: From a distance, grab the cherry as if it were a ball.

https://instagram.com/p/tswjVIp7SH/

 

10. “SpoonBridge Pose”

Directions: Calling all yogis! Do any yoga pose that aligns with the sculpture; you can get really creative with this one.

International Pop: After Hours Preview Party

On Friday evening the Walker  filled with dazzling colors, 1960’s pop hits, sushi-art making, carnival games, and a karaoke party. There was even a Ferris wheel lit with psychedelic colors, that seemed to dance into the Minneapolis skyline. Served were international hot dogs, day-glo donuts, and Fizz Bang Pop cocktails. Hundreds came to celebrate the opening of […]

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These IPOP balloons won’t pop. Photo: Angela Jimenez

On Friday evening the Walker  filled with dazzling colors, 1960’s pop hits, sushi-art making, carnival games, and a karaoke party. There was even a Ferris wheel lit with psychedelic colors, that seemed to dance into the Minneapolis skyline. Served were international hot dogs, day-glo donuts, and Fizz Bang Pop cocktails. Hundreds came to celebrate the opening of International Pop, ready to show off their best threads from that iconic era. The exhibition reexamines Pop art through a multicultural lens, including artwork from international artists such as Czech artist Jiří Kolář and Brazilian artist Antonio Manuel. Although important American figures of the period are featured, such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, they aren’t the only stars of the show. Instead, they share the stage equally with non-American works. This capacious approach to Pop allowed for other themes such as Brazillian neo-concretism, protofeminism, and political criticisms to come to discussion. The  Walker-organized exhibition will be in Minneapolis through August before traveling to the Dallas Museum of Art and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Former Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak (at left)

Former Minneapolis Mayor RT Rybak (at left) and wife Megan see Japanese artist Shinohara Ushio’s 1962 painting, Oiran. Photo: Samantha Sacks

People enjoying games outside.

People enjoying games outside by the Ferris wheel. Photo: Angela Jimenez

 

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This audience is truly entertained by the karaoke songs. Photo: Angela Jimenez

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More karaoke in the Garden Terrace Room. Photo: Angela Jimenez

Molly Nelson and Ellen Roth

Molly Nelson and Ellen Roth. Photo: Samantha Sacks

These two had no hesitations to truly embody the look of the era. Smiling, they exclaimed, “We’ve been friends for ten years!” No wonder their jumpsuits were so well coordinated.

Taking a mighty swing to hit the bell

A well-executed swing sets off the Hi-Striker’s bell—and in heels, no less. Photo: Samantha Sacks

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Crafting sushi from paper in the Star Tribune Art Lab. Photo: Angela Jimenez

Spending some of prom night seeing Thomas Bayrle's 1966 "Mao"

Spending part of prom night seeing Thomas Bayrle’s 1966 Mao (1966). Photo: Samantha Sacks

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A weiner bar, featuring sausages from Argentine, Brazil, Japan, and—in this case—Germany. Photo: Angela Jimenez

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Hitting the dance floor with DJ Izzy and Liberty Finch of KFAI. Photo: Samantha Sacks

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And some more dancing. Photo: Angela Jimenez

Enjoying a ride on the Ferris wheel and a gorgeous view of the city

Enjoying a ride on the Ferris wheel and a gorgeous view of the downtown Minneapolis. Photo: Angela Jimenez

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Patiently waiting for a nighttime ride. Photo: Samantha Sacks

Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon 2015

Edit-a-thon Participants

Art +Feminism Sign

On Sunday, March 8, many Wikipedians, both new and seasoned in editing, filled the Walker Library and Art Lab to contribute to the second annual Art + Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon, in celebration of International Women’s Day. This satellite event was one of more than 70 that took place internationally over the weekend. The goal of this event is to narrow the vast gender gap that exists on Wikipedia by representing more feminism and art related topics. In 2011, the Wikimedia Foundation found that women only account for 8.5 percent of Wikipedia editors. This enormous disparity accounts for the general lack of women in the arts being represented on the world’s largest online encyclopedia and seventh most popular website, globally.

Art + Feminism’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon event was in February of 2014. Following the success of this event, organizers of the event were included in Foreign Policy Magazine’s List of 100 Leading Global Thinkers.

Edit-a-thon Participants

The day started off with an introduction to the event and its deeper purposes by Walker hosts Amy Fox, Jill Vuchetich, and Margit Wilson, followed by an informational crash course in Wikipedia editing led by Wikipedia experts. They went over the Wikipedia coding language, which included the general layout of an article, how to bold and italicize words, and how to add citations. There are also many rules and guidelines for editing and creating Wikipedia pages that must be taken into account to avoid criticism from the Wikipedia community experts. Articles must be written objectively, have citations from reliable sources, be respectful, and be notable subjects or considered important by the rest of the Wikipedia community.

In a recent article from Hyperallergic, Sarah Cowan writes about the flagship event that took place at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She comments on, “how deeply skewed Wikipedia’s measures of importance are.”

What actually makes something important? Wikipedia’s five pillars state that they, “strive for articles that document and explain the major points of view.”

If the majority of editors are men, then subjects and points of view that women may find to be very important can easily be shot down and deleted. Cowan found this pillar to be a bit ironic for the purposes of the event, in that part of the feminist initiative is to, “give underprivileged members of society a voice.”

List of Edits

Thirty-five topics and artist pages were created or improved upon during the afternoon. Pages were created for artists internationally such as the Canadian artist collective, FASTWÜRMS, and Chinese multimedia artist, Cao Fei. Pages were also created on American painters, Sarah Crowner and Dianna Molzan, whose works have been featured at the Walker Art Center exhibition, Painter Painter.

It is likely that participants will take their editing skills home with them, continuing their efforts on expanding topics on art and feminism. What was accomplished by the participants on Sunday was a fantastic addition to the ever expanding topics on art and feminism being represented on Wikipedia. However, the more important accomplishment of this event was empowering both men and women, alike, to create a more equal representation of gender on Wikipedia.

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