Blogs Untitled (Blog) This Day in Pop

This Day in Pop: Jasper Johns Visits Japan

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind-the-scenes stories. In May of 1964, Jasper Johns was invited to visit Tokyo under the auspices of the […]

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind-the-scenes stories.

Jasper Johns posing with Kojima Nobuaki’s Standing Figures, Tokyo, 1964 Photograph by Jun’ichi Takeishi; courtesy Tsubouchi Kazutada

Jasper Johns posing with Kojima Nobuaki’s Standing Figures, Tokyo, 1964.  Photo: Jun’ichi Takeishi, courtesy Tsubouchi Kazutada

In May of 1964, Jasper Johns was invited to visit Tokyo under the auspices of the Minami Gallery for a two-month artist’s residency, facilitated by Tōno Yoshiaki. Tōno took Johns to the Tsubaki Kindai Gallery to see a number of Kojima Nobuaki’s Standing Figure (1964) works, which, like many of Johns’s own works, used the American flag. Johns returned to the gallery the following month to view the Off Museum exhibition. There he met Shinohara Ushio and saw the latter’s imitation of Johns’s Three Flags (1958), which replicated the painting’s composition but substituted its colors with their opposites on the spectrum. This in turn influenced Johns to borrow from Shinohara’s palette for a painting he would show in the 1965 Whitney Annual Exhibition in New York.

Also:

  • While in Japan Johns corresponded with his gallerist, Leo Castelli, about various business matters, including an exhibition with Robert Rauschenberg. The Smithsonian Archives of American Art have digitized one of the letters he sent while traveling and made it available in their online collection.
  • On May 1, 1928, Oswald de Andrade published the Manifesto Antropófago or Cannibalist Manifesto. It would become a foundational text for Brazilian modernism and introduced the concept of “cultural cannibalism” that would influence intellectuals and artists for decades.

 

This Day in Pop: The 1964/65 World’s Fair Opens in New York

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind-the-scenes stories. With a theme of “Peace through Understanding,” the third world’s fair to be held in New […]

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind-the-scenes stories.


Roy Lichtenstein designed the cover for the April 1964 issue of Art in America, depicting a "pop panorama" of the New York World's Fair

Roy Lichtenstein designed the cover for the April 1964 issue of Art in America, depicting a “pop panorama” of the New York World’s Fair. Image courtesy Walker Art Center Library and Archive

With a theme of “Peace through Understanding,” the third world’s fair to be held in New York opened fifty-one years ago this week. The fair would run two six-month seasons between 1964 and 1965, and celebrated achievements in culture and technology, presenting a particularly optimistic view of the future. Mid-century modern architecture dominated the grounds, while international pavilions represented nations ranging from Vatican City to Thailand. American industry took center stage, with Ford and General Motors each claiming their own buildings and Disney contributing to multiple entertainment areas.

Although the grounds featured a fine arts building and several dedicated exhibitions of contemporary and modern art, popular consensus was that the most successful artistic interventions at the 64/65 fair were incorporated into the architecture and displays of other buildings. The Spanish pavilion was lauded for featuring works by Goya, Picasso, and Miró, while the Better Living Center received strong reviews for its inclusion of works by Sargent, de Kooning, and Pollock. Contemporary American art was most notably represented in the Phillip Johnson–designed New York State building. The architect commissioned murals for the building’s facade by several Pop artists, among them Robert Indiana, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist. Controversy ensued just two weeks before the fair when Warhol’s mural, Thirteen Most Wanted Men, was mounted and revealed to feature 22 mugshots of fugitives screen-printed onto masonite. Under pressure from government officials including Governor Nelson Rockefeller, Johnson requested that Warhol revise the mural or remove it from the building. The artist responded by suggesting that he replace the mugshots with portraits of Robert Moses, the head of the World’s Fair Corporation. Johnson refuted the idea, and Warhol’s work was quickly painted over with aluminum house paint. Although the original work was never exhibited as a public mural, Warhol reused the silkscreens for a series of prints that same year. More than five decades later Thirteen Most Wanted Men and the ensuing scandal continue to prompt discourse around Warhol’s position within mainstream popular culture.

Also:

  • Following the fair’s conclusion in 1965, two of the murals from Phillip Johnson’s New York State pavilion moved to Minnesota. The works, by Roy Lichtenstein and James Rosenquist, were donated to the Weisman Art Museum in 1966.
  • In April of 1960 French critic Pierre Restany introduced the Nouveaux Réalistes—a group he founded and named—through his manifesto “The Nouveaux Réalistes’ Declaration of Intention.”

This Day in Pop: Pop Art and the American Tradition

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind the scenes stories. On April 9, 1965 the Milwaukee Art Center opened Pop art and the American tradition, a month-long […]

In conjunction with the exhibition International Pop we’re presenting a regular feature that will highlight events in Pop art history. Look forward to curated posts featuring archival images, exhibition installation views, excerpts from catalogs, artist ephemera, and behind the scenes stories.


Pop 1 (782x1024) Pop2 (800x1024)

On April 9, 1965 the Milwaukee Art Center opened Pop art and the American tradition, a month-long exhibition that contextualized artists such as  Rosalyn Drexler, Roy Lichtenstein, Marisol, and Ed Ruscha within the history of “American artists’ interest in the common and the banal.” Eighty-six artists were included in the exhibition, which also featured late 19th- and early 20th-century painters including Paul Cadmus, Marsden Hartley, and Reginald Marsh. Although the exhibition focused exclusively on American art, the curatorial premise of Pop having an ancestry in sign painting, commercial art, and Dada correlates with contemporary perspectives on international influences on Pop artists.

Also this week:

  • On April 4, 1966 the Walker opened the first U.S. exhibition of the artist Michelangelo Pistoletto.  This short film shows footage of Michelangelo Pistoletto: Reflected World, which was curated by former Walker Art Center Director Martin Friedman.
  • On April 6, 1967 Nova Objetividade Brasiliera (New Brazilian Objectivity) opened at the Museum of Modern Art in Rio de Janeiro. The exhibition featured artists including Lygia Pape, Nelson Leirner, Rubens Gerchman, Lygia Clark, and Hélio Oiticica. Oiticica’s contribution, the environment Tropicália, was particularly influential and gave its name to the emerging Tropicalia movement.

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