Blogs Untitled (Blog) Postcommodity

Postcommodity (Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, and Kade L. Twist) is an interdisciplinary arts collective based in the Southwest United States. The group’s art functions as “a shared indigenous lens to engage the assaultive manifestations of the global market and its supporting institutions, public perceptions, beliefs, and individual actions that comprise the ever-expanding, multinational, multiracial, and multiethnic colonizing force defining the 21st century through ever-increasing velocities and complex forms of violence.” Works include Repellent Fence (2015), a community engaged land artwork in which replica “scare-eye” balloons were installed at the US/Mexico border. Extending away from the border fence for a mile in each direction, the project both reclaimed the open-eye symbol’s native roots and aimed to serve as a “suture,” ceremonially knitting together the communities of Douglas, Arizona, and Agua Prieta, Sonora. The collective has exhibited internationally, including at the Biennial of the Moving Image in Belgium and the 18th Biennale of Sydney in Australia. Their work will be included in the 2017 Whitney Biennial, the solo show Coyotaje at Art in General in Brooklyn (2017), documenta 14, and in Sam Wainwright Douglas’s documentary Through the Repellent Fence: A Land Art Film (2017). In 2018, Postcommodity will unveil a new commission at the San Francisco Art Institute.

2043: No Es Un Sueño

As an institution dedicated to the free expression of artists, the Walker commissions a multiplicity of makers across disciplines—including Ron Athey, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Gary Simmons, and Ana Tijoux—to respond to the headlines through its ongoing Artist Op-Eds series. In the series’ eleventh commission, the indigenous art collective Postcommodity (Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, and Kade L. Twist) melds poetry and prose […]

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Postcommodity, Repellent Fence, 2015. Photo: Michael Lundgren, courtesy Bockley Gallery

As an institution dedicated to the free expression of artists, the Walker commissions a multiplicity of makers across disciplines—including Ron Athey, Natascha Sadr HaghighianGary Simmons, and Ana Tijoux—to respond to the headlines through its ongoing Artist Op-Eds series. In the series’ eleventh commission, the indigenous art collective Postcommodity (Raven Chacon, Cristóbal Martínez, and Kade L. Twist) melds poetry and prose in a powerful reflection on native self-determination, ethnic and national identity, and the year 2043—when whites are expected to become a minority in the United States. To launch the print edition of this text, the artists participated in an artists’ talk at the Walker on Saturday, March 11, 2017. 


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It seems that here, seventeen years into the 21st century, we have more people than ever before envisioning themselves in places they never thought they might be. They can be at Standing Rock, protecting water via six degrees of “status shares.” Through a sepia filter on a camera app aimed at a panoramic desert, they can walk a northbound mile in someone else’s burning shoes. One can even triangulate their preferred newsfeed to one pinpoint, not geographically speaking but rather to objectively arrive at a comfortable destination of information that agrees with them. Of course, one may not physically be at these sites of conflict. Or maybe they are. When one can so easily define and understand the world for themselves, what can be done to rebreak it?2 (more…)

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