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9/11 & Art: Remembering what matters

Earlier this week, Walker assistant curator Bartholomew Ryan wrote a thoughtful piece for MPR’s State of the Arts blog about how 9/11 has influenced art making. Responding to a question posed there – “What art resonates most with you when thinking about the events of 9/11?” – Walker colleagues Dean Otto (film/video curator) and Siri Engberg and Betsy Carpenter […]

Earlier this week, Walker assistant curator Bartholomew Ryan wrote a thoughtful piece for MPR’s State of the Arts blog about how 9/11 has influenced art making. Responding to a question posed there – “What art resonates most with you when thinking about the events of 9/11?” – Walker colleagues Dean Otto (film/video curator) and Siri Engberg and Betsy Carpenter (visual arts curators) and I selected works from our collections that speak to our shared desire for peace, reconciliation, humility, grace, tolerance and gratitude. Some do this quite concretely; others, more poetically.  We leave you with these images as you head into this weekend of remembrance.


Ellsworth Kelly, Ground Zero, Collection of the Whitney Museum of American Art

Film still from Live From Shiva’s Dance Floor, directed by Richard Linklater, on view through October 30 in the Walker’s Lecture Room

 

Raymond Pettibon, Sunday Night and Saturday Morning, 2005

 

Vija Celmins, Untitled [Clouds], 1975

 

Alec Soth, Enchanted Forest,  2010

 

Gabriel Orozco, Isla en la Isla (Island within an Island), 1993

 

JoAnn Verburg,WTC, 2003

 

 

Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled (Last Light), 1993

 

Paul Thek, 2 Birds, 1975

 

Robert Irwin, Untitled, 1971

 

Yoko Ono and John Lennon, War is Over!, 1969

 

Pierre Huyghe, Wind Chime (after “Dream”), 1997/2009, currently on view in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden

A note on my selection: Last summer, artists from the Red76 collective spent three weeks at the Walker’s Open Field working with visitors to build a collective space for learning, the Anywhere/Anyplace Academy. Several children expressed the need for humans to better understand and have more empathy towards dragons and created the “Human and Dragon School for Peace and Reconciliation through Story and Song,” pictured here:

  • Courtney says:

    I’d like to contribute one additional piece: On Kawara’s TODAY series. Since 1966 the artist On Kawara has created a painting every day depicting the day’s date in the language of the country in which its painted. The paintings generally take 8 to 9 hours; a typical day’s work for some. This work resonates with me as I remember 9/11 because it asks one, very simply, to pause and contemplate what an entire day encompasses. The content of a day may be varied and host both good and bad. We may not have any memory of certain days. Others still are so vivid that we wish we could turn down the volume of our memory. Finally, I see the act behind this work as a kind of perseverance to move forward, but acknowledging the residue of what’s come before.

    For examples from the TODAY series, please visit ArtsConnectEd: http://artsconnected.org/resource/printImage/90963.

  • Abbie says:

    My addition to this gallery is Siah Armajani’s Prayer. From afar, the white noise of this painting’s surface is nebulous and indecipherable. Upon inspection, the surface is pulsing with incantations.

  • rebecca says:

    John Dubrow, a figurative painter from NYC, received a studio space, granted by an organization in the world trade center in 1995. He painted views out his window, from the building, vertical cropped images. These paintings were shown in 1999 at the World Trade Center, the show was titled “World Views”… incredibly powerful paintings, especially since these “views” no longer exist. He shows with Lori Bookstein in NYC.