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Bits & Pieces: Yves Klein, Alfons Schilling, Goshka Macuga, Fiona Banner

What’s in a name? Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, the title of Klein’s newly opened retrospective, definitely radiates a mysterious kind of cool. But what does it mean? Co-curator Philippe Vergne explains the origins of “Avec le vide, les pleins pouvoirs”  in his essay for the exhibition catalogue, noting that it was a comment […]

What’s in a name?
Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, the title of Klein’s newly opened retrospective, definitely radiates a mysterious kind of cool. But what does it mean? Co-curator Philippe Vergne explains the origins of “Avec le vide, les pleins pouvoirs”  in his essay for the exhibition catalogue, noting that it was a comment left by writer/philosopher Albert Camus in the guest book at Yves Klein’s 1958 exhibition Le Vide (The Void) in Paris. Camus was referring not only to Klein’s aesthetic, but also Charles de Gaulle’s politics: in an attempt to resolve the Algerian War, the French military hero had come out of retirement and seized constitutional “full power”—an act that, Vergne notes, marked “the beginning of a social revolution, and, ultimately, the end of an era.”

 

Touring Minnesota with Walker artist-in-residence Goshka Macuga
Thanks to a surveying error, Walker Art Center founder T. B. Walker and his fellow lumber barons never logged “The Lost 40,” a site that is actually 144 acres, located about halfway between Big Falls and Bemidji in Minnesota’s north woods. Designated by the Department of Natural Resources as a “scientific and natural area,” the Lost 40 boasts the largest stand of old-growth red pine trees in the area, in addition to white pines dating back more than 300 years. Walker artist-in-residence Goshka Macuga visited the site a few weeks ago, along with assistant curator Bartholomew Ryan and staff photographer Cameron Wittig (who took the image posted here — watch the Walker blogs for more from Wittig on the trip). Macuga’s exhibition opens on the other side of winter: April 14, 2011 — for now, here’s a profile on her from Frieze magazine.

New to the Walker collection — and its galleries
Call it the New Old Action Painting: Vienna-based artist Alfons Schilling put a distinctive and kinetic spin, so to speak, on works by Jackson Pollock et al with this work, while also maintaining the enthusiastic claim that he had a hand in inventing spin-art kits for children. The timing is right, since untitled (Ándromeda) spin-painting was made in 1962 (before Damien Hirst, another artist who’s dabbled in this genre, was even born). Designed to whirl at three revolutions per second, Ándromeda is both a powerful object and a performance relic that relates directly to other great works from the era in the Walker collection—which is why it quickly went on display in the exhibition Event Horizon.

A virtual sneak preview of 50/50: Audience and Experts Curate the Paper Collection
Mid-term elections are nigh, but some may be curious about the results of another contest: the audience-selected artworks for this exhibition, which opens December 16. Nearly 250,000 votes were tallied in just six weeks: you can view the results here as a running list — starting with the #1 work shown here, Fiona Banner’s screenprint Break Point –or watch a slideshow of each work (featuring a special zoom tool). Note that until the show is installed in December, there’s no way to know how many of these works will make it onto the walls, given the wide range of sizes among them.

  • Lynn McGuire says:

    Supergroup’s presence at the Yves Kleine exhibit contributed a striking synergy. Their signature colored mime outfits, organic choregography–blending well with the work and the “crowd” of visitors– blended amazingly as well with Klein’s anatomical lines and bold colors.

    We who witnessed the supergroup live artshow that comingled with the Klein show, want to see more photos of their venue and involvement with the public last weekend at the Walker.

    http://www.supergroupshow.biz/about.html