Blogs Untitled (Blog)

2014: The Year According to Fionn Meade

2014 brought a new face and a new position to the Walker: Fionn Meade became our new senior curator of cross-disciplinary platforms, a job that acknowledges the “shifting terrain” of artmaking today, when artists fluidly traverse media and presentation spaces, from gallery to stage and beyond. In conjunction with 2014: The Year According to   […]

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2014 brought a new face and a new position to the Walker: Fionn Meade became our new senior curator of cross-disciplinary platforms, a job that acknowledges the “shifting terrain” of artmaking today, when artists fluidly traverse media and presentation spaces, from gallery to stage and beyond. In conjunction with 2014: The Year According to                                 , our series of artist best of-2014 lists, Meade shares his own perspective on the year that was. For more on the Walker’s curatorial perspective, read 2014: The Year According to Olga Viso, featuring top picks from the Walker’s executive director.
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2014: The Year According to Olga Viso

In conjunction with 2014: The Year According to                                 , our series of artist-generated best-of-2014 lists, Walker director Olga Viso shares her favorites—exhibitions, news events, projects, and inspiring moments—of the last 12 months. To read more of the Walker’s curatorial […]

2014: The Year According to Rima Mokaiesh

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from artist Kalup to poet LaTasha Diggs, author Jeff Chang to futurist Nicolas Nova—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to             […]

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To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from artist Kalup to poet LaTasha Diggs, author Jeff Chang to futurist Nicolas Nova—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 . 

Rima Mokaiesh is director of The Arab Image Foundation, a nonprofit organization established in Beirut in 1997 with a mission to collect, preserve, and study photographs from the Middle East, North Africa, and the Arab diaspora. The AIF’s expanding collection is generated through artist- and scholar-led projects. The Foundation makes its collection accessible to the public through a wide spectrum of activities, including exhibitions, publications, videos, a website, and an online image database. The ongoing research and acquisition of photographs include so far Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, Jordan, Egypt, Morocco, Iraq, Iran, Mexico, Argentina, and Senegal. To date, the collection holds more than 600,000 photographs.

 


 

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Silvered Water, Syria Self-Portrait at Cannes

Wiam Simav Bedirxan and Ossama Mohammed worked together for several years on this documentary without ever having met in person, as one was in Syria and the other in France, both unable to travel. In this film, they share footage of life and death in the besieged city of Homs, through the eyes of “a thousand and one Syrians.” The film and its authors were received with strong emotion at Cannes, in a time where the world seems to be anesthetized to events in Syria.

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Rima 2014_2_Alex_Photo Caroline Tabet

Alexandre Paulikevitch’s Elgha performance premieres in Beirut

In this piece, Alexandre Paulikevitch tells a story of gender, violence, resistance, and freedom in a context of social and political turmoil in the Arab world. Paulikevitch blends traditional baladi techniques with contemporary dance. His creations are important artistic and socio-political statements.

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Le Plus Beau Jour by photographer Fouad Elkoury at Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris

This piece is a dialogue between the superb To live in time of war, by Lebanese poet Etel Adnan, and three stunning series of photographs by Fouad Elkoury, from different times and geographies, projected on flowing fabric screens. Simply hypnotizing.

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Rima 2014_4_Monditalia_Photo Gilbert McCarragher

Monditalia at the Venice Architectural Biennale

Biennale curator Rem Koolhaas invited 41 contributors to draw a portrait of Italy presented in the Biennale’s Arsenale in a brilliant composition of architecture, design, and visual or performing arts.

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Mommy, by Xavier Dolan

Xavier Dolan explores deep layers of love, violence, and mental health in a beautiful, terrifying, and exhilarating film. I laughed and I cried, and cannot wait to see what this brilliant mind produces next.

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55 artists confront the São Paulo Biennal about its sources of funding following Israel’s attack on Gaza

Fifty-five of the 68 artists exhibiting at the 2014 São Paulo Biennal addressed an open letter to the curators questioning the event’s funding in light of Israel’s attack on Gaza. In response, the biennal’s curators engaged in a conversation about the sources of funding of cultural events and the necessity of independence.

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Rima 2014_7_A portrait of Somayyeh, a 32-year old divorced teacher © Newsha Tavakolian for the Carmignac Foundation

Laureate of the Prix Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award returns grant, jury indignant

Iranian photographer Newsha Tavakolian received, returned, and re-accepted the Prix Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism award, igniting strong reactions from the prize’s jury members. The whole story shed light on the role of patrons in art and photography, and, again, the non-negotiability of independence.

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Ebola doctors named Time Person of the Year

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Bob Dylan performs a private concert for one single fan at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia

Dylan finally found a way not to disappoint massive audiences: he played for one single fan.

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Lebanese cops cannot tell a Salafi apart from a hipster

We live in a very much traumatized city, where people invent the clichés about themselves that are then perpetuated across the globe… Here, Lebanese cops arrested a simple dude who lives and breathes for hip-hop, and can be seen performing on Monday nights in Mar Mkhayel, basically because he happens to sport a bearded look.

 

2014: The Year According to Alejandro Cesarco

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from curator Devrim Bayar and artist Kalup Linzy to designer David Reinfurt and artist Shahryar Nashat—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to   […]

Alejandro_smallTo commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from curator Devrim Bayar and artist Kalup Linzy to designer David Reinfurt and artist Shahryar Nashat—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 . 

Alejandro Cesarco was born in 1975 in Montevideo, Uruguay. He has exhibited in galleries and museums in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. His most recent solo exhibitions include: Secondary Revision, Frac Île-de-France/Le Plateau, Paris (2013); A Portrait, A Story, And An Ending, Kunsthalle Zürich (2013); Alejandro Cesarco, MuMOK, Vienna (2012); Words Applied to Wounds, Murray Guy, New York (2012); The Early Years, Tanya Leighton, Berlin (2012); A Common Ground, Uruguayan Pavilion, 54th Venice Biennial (2011); One Without The Other, Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico (2011); and Present Memory, Tate Modern, London (2010). Group exhibitions include: Under The Same Sun, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2014); Plaisance, Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis (2013); The Imminence of Poetics, 30th Bienal de São Paulo (2012); formes brèves, autres, FRAC Lorraine, Metz, and MARCO, Vigo (2012); Short Stories, Sculpture Center, Long Island City (2011); and Nine Screens, MoMA, New York (2010). He was the 2011 winner of the Baloize Art Prize, with his installation The Street Were Dark With Something More Than Night Or The Closer I Get To The End The More I Rewrite The Beginning at Art 42 Basel. These exhibitions addressed, through different formats and strategies, his recurrent interests in repetition, narrative, and the practices of reading and translating. He has also curated exhibitions in the U.S., Uruguay, Argentina, and a project for the 6th Mercosur Biennial (2007), Porto Alegre, Brazil. He is director of the nonprofit arts organization, Art Resources Transfer. Forthcoming solo exhibitions in 2015 include: Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis; Murray Guy, New York; Parra-Romero, Madrid; and Kiria Koula, San Francisco. He lives and works in New York.

 


 

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Pierre Huyghe, Centre Pompidou (Paris)

Installed within the structure left vacant after Mike Kelley’s retrospective in the same space, Huyghe’s continuous attempts at reinventing the exhibition model as a site of playful experimentation came together movingly. Works bled and echoed into one another, for an experience that felt partly choreographed and partly left to chance—the presence of animals in Huyghe’s work played a key role in this. (For more art and animals see Godard’s latest marvel, mentioned below.)

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Mike Kelley, MoMA/PS1 (New York)

Curated by Ann Goldstein, organized by the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. What better place to house Kelley’s posthumous retrospective than in a defunct cavernous-like school building? Birdhouses, Educational Complex, felt-banners, Extracurricular Activities, and all their trippy post-punk consequences.

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RIP Elaine Sturtevant

Bruce Hainley’s monograph Under The Sign of [SIC]: Sturtevant’s Volte-Face (Semiotext[e], 2014) and Sturtevant: Double Trouble (curated by Peter Eleey, Museum of Modern Art, Nov 9, 2014–Feb. 9, 2015) were two long overdue acknowledgments of the key role Sturtevant has played in the politics of style, image production, and reception.

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Haim Steinbach, once again the world is flat, Kunsthalle Zürich

I actually did not make it to Zürich to see this show—which was curated by Beatrix Ruf, Tom Eccles, and Johanna Burton—but its CCS Bard iteration (June 22–December 20, 2013) was, to my mind, one of the most memorable exhibitions of 2013.

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Louise Lawler, No Drones, Metro Pictures

A follow-up to Lawler’s adjusted to fit series, the tracings presented in this show pushed forward a self-reflective analysis of the reception of the artist’s own work as analogy to the state of the art world and its larger contexts. Sharp and humorous, as always. An exemplary practice where every move counts.

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RIP On Kawara

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Private tour of Christopher Williams, The Production Line of Happiness, Museum of Modern Art

Led by the artist and organized by Artists Space. A master class on exhibition design, institutional critique, and ways of looking. The show is also accompanied by one of the year’s most stunning catalogues.

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Amy Sillman, One Lump or Two, Hessel Museum of Art, CCS Bard

Curated by Helen Molesworth. Brilliant and sensuous. Figuration, abstraction, animation all with Sillman’s trademark wry wit. An artist to look up to.

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Martin Beck, Last Night, full listening session

Organized by White Columns, PS1, and the New York Art Book Fair, Last Night, Beck’s latest publication, documents the 118 songs played by David Mancuso on June 2, 1984 at the last party of the 99 Prince Street location of the Loft. On Sept. 13, Beck (with the help of Matthew Higgs) played the 13-hour-long playlist.

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RIP Harun Farocki

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Jean-Luc Godard, Good Bye To Language

At 83, the masterful auteur can’t stop himself from continuing to explore the possibilities of cinema and has produced possibly the most radical 3D film ever made. At certain moments Godard moves the dual camera lenses out of sync, emphasizing the artificiality of the 3D effect. These sequences seem to require viewers to close one eye or the other, and to in turn devise individual montages with their own senses. The director’s beloved dog Roxy is the other star of the film.

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DUC

The Distribution to Underserved Communities Library Program of Art Resources Transfer celebrated another year of creating access to the arts and education by distributing free contemporary art books among a growing public of library patrons, students, artists, and readers across the country. In the last year alone, the DUC distributed more than $690,000 worth of new art books to 517 public schools and libraries nationwide.

2014: The Year According to Devrim Bayar

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from curator and architect Andreas Angelidakis and musician Grant Hart  to poet LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs and artist Alejandro Cesarco—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year […]

Devrim Bayar

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from curator and architect Andreas Angelidakis and musician Grant Hart  to poet LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs and artist Alejandro Cesarco—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 .

Devrim Bayar is curator at WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, where she recently organized the exhibitions of Daan van Golden, Thomas Bayrle, Allen Ruppersberg, and Robert Heinecken, among other projects. In 2015 she will curate the first large survey exhibition of French artist Pierre Leguillon entitled The Museum of Mistakes: Contemporary Art and Class Struggle, which proposes an exhibition model that attempts to foil, or “de-class-ify”—to reprise the exhibition’s title—the hierarchies of art. She is the founder of the web platform Le Salon aimed at presenting, documenting and reflecting on the Brussels contemporary art scene.


 

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Belgium vs. USA at the World Cup

The FIFA World Cup means something different for every participating country. This year, the Belgian team’s efforts became a timely symbol of national pride and identity soon after local elections had seen separatist parties gain even more power. In this regard, the match of Belgium vs. USA was the most electrifying. I had never seen my city stand so still as all eyes were riveted to TV monitors. When Belgium finally won after a tough battle, the European capital literally exploded. People from all linguistic and ethnic communities descended on the streets to celebrate the victory of Belgium and this multicultural celebration was a wonderful sign of what Belgium really stands for, against the current right wing political mood.

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The adoption of the law allowing parents to choose the family name of their children

If, as Jeff Koons would claim, procreation is the way to eternity, why should eternity bear fathers’ names only? Under pressure from the European Court of Human Rights, Belgian lawmakers have tried for 15 years to pass a law that allows parents to choose which last name they give their children. This year the law was finally adopted, allowing parents to choose between the father’s, the mother’s or both parent’s last name, marking a new step in the direction for more gender equality and allowing me to give my soon-to-be-born daughter my family name.

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Haim Steinbach, once again the world is flat. at Kunsthalle Zürich (curated by Beatrix Ruf)

This exhibition literally blew my mind. It not only offered the rare opportunity to discover early works by the artist and to retrace his evolution but also introduced a remarkable scenography created by the artist himself who thus reinterpreted his own works and played with the exhibition codes at its core. At once seducing, full of humor, and complex, this show allowed us to firmly grasp Steinbach’s reflection about art, display, and commerce and their interconnections.

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Jef Cornelis at the Liverpool Biennial (curated by Anthony Huberman and Mai Abu ElDahab)

Jef Cornelis is a TV director who is well known and respected in Belgium but much less recognized abroad. I was thus happily surprised to see an entire section of the Liverpool Biennial dedicated to his work. His documentaries from the early 1960’s until the end of the 1990’s exploded the conventions of television and provide a unique insight into the history of the arts of the time.

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Daan van Golden: Photo Book(s)

My former colleague Emiliano Battista accompanied me throughout my research on Daan van Golden for the retrospective exhibition that I curated at WIELS in 2012. Following this in-depth research, he developed a fascination for the photographic work of the artist and published a monograph entirely dedicated to this generally less documented part of van Golden’s practice. His book reproduces every page of every catalog on which van Golden published a photograph. The book thus reveals the people and the motives that keep coming back in the work of van Golden while playing with the notion of repetition so dear to the artist. Brilliant!

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Planningtorock, All Love’s Legal (released by Human Level)

Without hesitation the album I listened to the most this year. All Love’s Legal proves that artists can still create politically engaged songs that keep you dancing all night long. And it works at the gym too!

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Instagram accounts of K8 HARDY, Rob Pruitt, Jerry Saltz,…

I might be late on this one but it’s only this year that I signed onto Instagram thanks to NYC artist Megan Marrin, who lived at my place at the beginning of the year and convinced me to join the social network. I must admit that I have taken pleasure in following people who excel in appropriating new technologies for their social satire. Now I am looking for more of these fun yet provocative web persona.

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Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys, Die Schmutzigen Puppen von Pommern, Micheline Szwajcer Galerie (Antwerp) and Art Basel Unlimited

Jos de Gruyter and Harald Thys are two of my favorite Belgian artists, whose work explore dark psychological states and spaces. Their recent series of scarecrows are characters “allergic to social positivism and utilitarianism, who abhor humans who aspire to physical health, labour, and reasonable material wealth.” Presented at Art Basel Unlimited, this installation provided a stark yet healthy contrast to the generally seducing and complaisant atmosphere of the fair.

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Joachim Olender, La collection qui n’existait pas

La collection qui n’existait pas premiered just a week ago and hasn’t been subtitled in English yet. This documentary about the conceptual art collection Herman and Nicole Daled built in the 70’s, and which the MoMA recently acquired, provides an authentic and rare insight into the life of these collectors, who considered collecting nothing less than a form of political engagement. A lesson from which many should learn today.

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Robert Heinecken: Lessons in Posing Subjects (co-published by WIELS & Triangle Books)

2014 has seen the publication of the entire series of Robert Heinecken’s Lessons in Posing Subjects which the American artist created in 1981-1982 and which was the centerpiece of the show of the same title I curated at WIELS over the summer. Thanks to the help of the artist’s estate, my partner Olivier Vandervliet of Triangle Books and I conceived this publication as a real artist book. It took us many long hours to work on the hundreds of Polaroid prints that are reproduced in this book in order to stay as true as possible to the analog original with our digital means. I am very proud of the result of our efforts and that it will leave a trace to this remarkable body of work.

2014: The Year According to Korakrit Arunanondchai

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from author Jeff Chang and composer Eyvind Kang to designer Eric Hu and filmmaker Sam Green—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to   […]

"The future" Performance for ICA London

Korakrit Arunanondchai (at center, with boychild) at ICA London following the October 2014 performance of The Future

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from author Jeff Chang and composer Eyvind Kang to designer Eric Hu and filmmaker Sam Green—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 .

Korakrit Arunanondchai is a New York– and Bangkok-based artist whose artistic discipline spans a wide range of media. Inspired by Rirkrit Tiravanija, he creates immersive installations that emphasize “social participation” and incorporates elements that allow the audience to discover themselves. Arunanondchai has had solo exhibitions at MoMA PS1, Long Island City (2014); The Mistake Room, Los Angeles (2014); the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw (2014); and CLEARING gallery, New York and Brussels (2013). He has has been featured in major group exhibitions at ICA, London (2013); Jim Thompson House, Bangkok (2013); Sculpture Center, Long Island City (2012); and the Fisher Landau Center for Art, New York (2012).

 


 

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Bangkok StrikeHunger game strike, Bangkok

The three-fingers hand salute from the Hunger Games is now banned in Thailand due to the military takeover.

 

 

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Image: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

 Polar Vortex

A happening of 2014, apparently coming back in 2015 as well.

 

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Interstellar

In relationship to Polar Vortex, this is a movie of 2014 about a time when we have to leave Earth because we’ve destroyed it.

 

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1024px-CMS_Higgs-eventGod particle

No real-world impact yet, but the fact that the Higgs boson particle actually exists seems promising for quantum physics. It took them 40 years, including the building of Cern’s Hadron Collider, to discover the particle.

 

 

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PARK 5Park McArthur’s Ramps at Essex Street

One of my favorite exhibition I saw this year.

 

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Wu Tsang and Boychild at Stedelijk Museum

A very touching performance in a room filled with Dan Flavin. Part of a larger project, which is a feature film called A Day in the Life of Bliss.

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DC legalizing weed

420 at the capital of USA????? Not confirmed yet but still a possibility.

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The Lego Movie

I hope there are sequels.

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Pewdiepie on South Park

Without watching the final episodes of South Park this season, I would never have guessed that the most subscribed YouTube celebrity in the world is ………. Pewdiepie.

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ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

Let’s not forget this happened in 2014. Most importantly, we have to remember that it was about raising awareness for ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).

2014: The Year According to Shahryar Nashat

To commemorate the year that was, we invited artists, designers, and thinkers across disciplines to share a list of their most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects of 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 .  Shahryar Nashat […]

Nashat

To commemorate the year that was, we invited artists, designers, and thinkers across disciplines to share a list of their most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects of 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 . 

Shahryar Nashat was born in 1975 in Geneva, Switzerland, and lives and works in Berlin. Nashat uses a broad range of media including video, digital print, and photography. Recent solo exhibitions include Lauréat du prix Lafayette, Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2014); Replay the Ruse, Silberkuppe, Berlin (2012); Stunt, Kunstverein Hamburger Bahnhof, Hamburg (2012); and Workbench, Studio Voltaire, London (2011). His work has also been shown as part of the 8th Berlin Biennale (2014); Catch as Catch Can, Locks Gallery, Philadelphia (2013); When Attitudes Became Form Become Attitudes, CCA Wattis, San Francisco (2012); ILLUMInations at the 54th International Venice Biennale (2011); and Frieze Projects, London (2010). Nashat has been awarded the Kunstpreis der Stadt Nordhorn (2013), the Swiss Exhibition Award (2009), and the Kiefer Hablitzel Prize (2000, 2001, 2002).

 


 

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bionic arm

Prosthetic devices can now restore a sense of feeling.

The fetish for the bionic limb, and the now artificial encroaching on the real fascinates me.

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Adam Linder

Some Proximity by Adam Linder

Adam‘s Some Proximity mediates criticism through the radical gestures of a gliding body. Presented with Silberkuppe during Frieze London, it did for me what every performance in a non-theatrical environment should do—it slowed down everything around it, allowing a focus on the bodies playing off of the critical statements that were fed directly from the environment.

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Under the Sign of [sic]: Sturtevant’s Volte-Face by Bruce Hainley

Published by the ever so thought provoking Semiotext(e), this monographic study is written with a variety of literary genres that mesh with each other to create a very singular piece of art criticism.

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Park McArthur

I first came across Park’s work earlier this year at her show at Essex Street. The interplay of sculptural, social, and bodily questions in her work are thoughtful and fresh. Can’t wait to see more.

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Jahresring 61

The everlasting tradition of one of Germany’s longest post-War annual journals for contemporary art and culture continues with this year’s iteration, masterfully edited by Dominic Eichler and Brigitte Oetker and published by Berlin’s Sternberg Press.

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Lee Lozano: Dropout Piece by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer

I really enjoyed reading this book that focuses on a single work by the late New York artist. A journalistic approach combined with art history and the author’s interpretative agency make an outstanding addition to Afterall’s One Work series.

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Spectrum Reverse Spectrum by Margaret Honda

I saw this 20 minute silent film at the Berlinale earlier this year. The film is a reproduction of the color spectrum captured in 70mm and made without a camera. The gradually changing array of color and light filling the screen confronted me with the sole performance of one most perfect medium.

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Transparent

Transparent by Jill Soloway

I totally binged on watching what became by far my favourite comedy-drama produced for the (internet) television this year. Set in Los Angeles, Transparent features Jeffrey Tambor, a father who comes out to his family as transgender. The writing is sharp, witty, sometimes even acerbic and the cast is flawless.

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National Gallery by Frederick Wiseman

It’s no secret I’m a sucker for the subject! Wiseman’s analytical camera lingering on the art, its spectators, and the backstage of one of Britain’s most famous museums is even more brilliant because he focuses on the museum guides that voice the discourse that accompanies the reception of art in an institutional context.

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Beyoncé at the Louvre

We’ve seen celebrities visiting museums (not to mention celebrities having private visiting hours in museums) and we’ve see celebrities posing in museums. However Bey and Jay’s photo-op at the Louvre, which comprised mimicked sculptural poses whilst making selfies, created complications that whether intentional or not, continue to intrigue me.

2014: The Year According to Kalup Linzy

Kalup Linzy. Photo: Daniel Trese To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from poet LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs and musician Grant Hart  to designer David Reinfurt and composer Eyvind Kang—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: […]

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Kalup Linzy. Photo: Daniel Trese

To commemorate the year that was, we invited an array of artists, writers, designers, and curators—from poet LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs and musician Grant Hart  to designer David Reinfurt and composer Eyvind Kang—to share a list of the most noteworthy ideas, events, and objects they encountered in 2014. See the entire series 2014: The Year According to                                 .

Kalup Linzy is a Brooklyn-based video and performance artist, whose work is featured in the Walker’s presentation of Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. Best known for his satirical soap opera–style narrative videos, Linzy is interested in exploring stereotypes, sexual identity, race, and gender. In 2010, he appeared alongside James Franco in the ABC soap opera General Hospital in an episode featuring performance art. More recently, he released an album for his multi-platform project Art Jobs and Lullabies, which can now be found on Spotify, iTunes, and other digital outlets. His videos can be viewed here. Linzy has held solo exhibitions at the Studio Museum in Harlem (2009); MoMA, New York (2008); Prospect.1, New Orleans (2008); MoMA PS1, Long Island City (2006); and LAXART, Los Angeles (2006). He has been featured in group exhibitions at the Garage Center, Moscow (2010); Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C. (2008); The Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre, London (2008); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2007); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2007); and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2006). His work is held in the collections of MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Studio Museum in Harlem, among others.

 


 

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1. Protesters at Galleria photo Emanuele Berry

Photo: Emanuele Berry

Mass die-in, St. Louis Galleria on Black Friday

Demonstrators poignantly and peacefully protested Black Friday in response to Darren Wilson not being indicted for shooting and killing Michael Brown. Several malls in the area were shut down.

 

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2. The Brant Foundation Homeless Kids w Dan Colen

Dan Colen, The Brant Foundation, Free Arts NYC, and The Department of Homeless Services.

Wonderful to hang out, mentor, eat pizza, and appropriate, through the eyes of children, Colen’s work.

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3. Jose Esteban Munoz The Whitney tribute

Celebrating the life and work of José Esteban Muñoz through performance: Take Ecstasy With Me, organized by Miguel Gutierrez and Alex Segade in conjunction with the 2014 Whitney Biennial

Muñoz cared, understood, and contextualized the work of many queer artists that most would not think twice about engaging with. Produced by the Whitney’s department of education and initiated by Gordon Hall, many of us took to the stage to perform. Included were myself, Nao Bustamante, Jorge Cortiñas, Juliana Huxtable, Miguel Gutierrez with I.n. Hafezi, My Barbarian, Kate Bush Dance Troupe, A.L. Steiner, and Jacolby Satterwhite. RIP, Jose. You are greatly missed.

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4. Blackish TraceeandThelma

Black-ish on ABC

A single-camera comedy that centers on an upper-middle-class African-American family. Many of the episodes focus on identity and cultural politics that contemporary art world types should find engaging. It stars Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross, who is pictured above with Thelma Golden.

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Bethann Hardison’s Dance Party

Hosted by Iman, Naomi Campbell, and Tyson Beckford. This was the most fun I had had in a while. Congrats to Bethann and all her pioneering contributions to the fashion industry!

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Creative Time Presents Kara Walker’s A Subtlety or The Marvelous Sugar Baby

Viewing the exhibition, I remembered a summer hanging out in the pepper fields with my father, who was a farmer and overseer in migrant work. I don’t ever recall being in a sugar cane field with him, but I do remember them existing and playing in them with my cousins. One day I told my father I wanted to be a farmer when I grew up. He said, “No, I want you to have an office job, because farming is hard labor.” At the time I didn’t really understand. I was just a kid who loved and was always excited to be with his dad. I left Walker’s exhibition being grateful for evolution and parents who desire more, fight, and work hard for their children to have a better life.

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Chris Ofili: Night And Day at the New Museum

Inspiring, rejuvenating… fanning that desire within to produce work that continues to resonate over time.

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Takashi Murakami at Gagosian

A beast of a show with intimate moments of offspring dispersed throughout.

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Rachel Feinstein’s The Last Days of Folly at Madison Square Park

With her sculptures as a backdrop, a one-day performance festival was staged and brought together luminaries from art, fashion, film, television, dance, and theater. Had me wanting to do one of my own. Kudos, Rachel! Hoping there’s more to come!

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Sweet Liberty Censored

The muddled, confusing details sounded like a plot from my web series As Da Art World Might Turn. Because I am not a fan of mine or my collaborators’ artistic voices being shooshed, here is the censored billboard with our original intentions above it. A sweet beautiful narrative.

Brian J. Evans on Performing Costume Made of Nothing

Costume Made of Nothing is a performance created by the artist Pope.L and is featured in the exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. It debuted at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) in 2012 and its most recent iteration at the Walker Art Center involved a weight-bearing structure and new movements. The performance takes […]

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Opening day performance of Costume Made of Nothing at the Walker Art Center, July 24, 2014. Photo: Gene Pittman

Costume Made of Nothing is a performance created by the artist Pope.L and is featured in the exhibition Radical Presence: Black Performance in Contemporary Art. It debuted at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (CAMH) in 2012 and its most recent iteration at the Walker Art Center involved a weight-bearing structure and new movements. The performance takes place in the galleries, thirteen times over the course of the exhibition’s five-month run.

Prior to the final performance of Costume Made of Nothing, I sat down with the performer, Brian J. Evans, who worked with Pope.L to develop this new piece. Join us on January 4, 2015, at 2 pm for Evans’s final performance, which coincides with the closing of Radical Presence.

Tell me about your background and training.

I’m from Cleveland, Ohio, but I moved to Gaylord, Minnesota when I was seven. I went to Gustavus Adolphus College for liberal arts and left with a dance major. I didn’t find dance until I was a sophomore and studied abroad as a junior, so I only had three semesters and two classes of dance training before I got into the field. I had always done performance and I got super lucky when one of my professors, who was in Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater, set me up with an audition. At the end of two rehearsals they asked me to come dance as an apprentice, and eight years later I’m a professional performer and teaching artist.

How did you find out about the opportunity to perform in Pope.L’s piece and what was your audition like?

I found out about the audition from a friend of a friend, and when opportunities like that come up, I take them. So I looked at the video of the performance at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, and my first inclination was that I didn’t want to do it. In this iteration the performer just stood there and put his arm into a hole in the wall, so I wasn’t so sure about it. But I did a little research on Pope.L and was impressed by what I found on Google. So I auditioned and went through the poses, and what then really peaked my interest was having a Skype conversation with Pope.L directly afterward. I remember he gave me directions to try out different movements, and he told me to go away and come back after thinking about it, but I decided to try to incorporate those instructions right then, on the spot. That’s when the collaboration started. I thought, ‘Good, let me try to do something that would inevitably start us on a process of collaboration.’

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Pope.L at the opening day performance of Costume Made of Nothing at the Walker Art Center, July 24, 2014. Photo: Gene Pittman

What was it like to work with Pope.L for that brief time that he was here in July? What was the working process?

There were three rehearsals, two to three hours each. In the first one, he said right up front that he’s not a choreographer and he’s not going to try to choreograph anything. He said that he would need me to collaborate with him to figure out the movements. He didn’t want to do what he did the other two times. The structure at the Walker is three times as big and is weight bearing. Right away we talked about his influences: Bauhaus and the German stylistic movements. We talked about character, and I thought to myself, ‘why the structure, why the costume?’

In the second rehearsal we got into it and he had this image of me hanging from the pipe. How to I get up there? Do I jump or crawl? So I improvised and crawled up and he said, “Yes, keep that.” We decided that I would say “Well” three times at different pitches and volumes. There are headphones attached to the piece, so what am I listening to? There were terms like ‘step and fetch it,’ ‘the funky chicken,’ and butoh—that’s where the walk came from. He would then send me away with different assignments like, how does this character walk, how does this thing look, how does he interact, why is he traveling, what does he do every day, and why does he continue to go to this structure? In the third rehearsal we had a set of instructions and a character sketch, and for opening night that’s what I had to work with. Since then, the character has evolved into a more multi-dimensional entity.

How has the audience reacted to this piece?

Pope.L and I talked about how it’s unimportant that there’s an audience. The character will do the performance regardless of an audience. There have been a lot of people that want to imitate me or block me when I’m moving through the space. I remember on opening night after it was done, Pope.L told me that this character doesn’t want to be touched, doesn’t want to be messed with, isn’t really inviting. I have to fight the temptation of allowing people to influence me. I don’t think this character is human so I don’t feel like I’m being mean to anybody, but I do find myself thinking, ‘Don’t touch me, don’t come close to me. I don’t know how I would react if you did.’

So it’s been interesting how people interact with me, whether they move or not. Older people tend to have a slightly more reserved reaction. I know I’ve startled people. Teenagers are always running away, but kids are fascinated. It’s performance art in a gallery, which is very different from performance on a stage. As a performer you’re trained to think that if people leave early you’re not doing your job correctly, but because this is not that, it’s been fine that some people stay for five minutes. It’s a different way of thinking about performance art.

Tell me how the performance has changed over time.

From the first time to today’s, and this was the twelfth time, it’s gone from more of a hollow character sketch of making sure I did all of the instructions right, to allowing myself to let the character interpret those instructions. That usually always changes because I, myself, as Brian, come to it differently everyday, because something’s happened or I’m thinking about something, or I’m totally focused, or I’m trying to reach a goal.

There were some performances where no one moved except for leaving and coming, and there were others where the audience would surround me and circle the structure. It’s different every time. When nobody is here I’m usually hoping that I don’t perform too quickly because there’s no one to feed off of. This was new today: when I was approaching the exhibition, I felt totally alone, so I thought, ‘I’m going to do my solo and no one’s going to see it and that’s fine.’ So that was a different mindset. I recognized people were watching me after a while, but my way into it was a solitary one.

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Opening day performance of Costume Made of Nothing at the Walker Art Center, July 24, 2014. Photo: Gene Pittman

The structure is like a prop or a second performer. How does its presence affect your performance?

I haven’t yet (maybe it will happen in the thirteenth performance) attached an identity to the structure. I will say that the structure does feel different. And that’s partly because of my physical stamina and how I’m able to approach it. The structure is the thing that keeps me grounded in what I’m doing. I always go back to it and everything is about that interaction, so I don’t ever really feel like I’m alone. Then it doesn’t really matter if anyone is watching, because this structure is consistent, unlike most things in my life [laughs]. Once we bolstered the structure, the thing became unbreakable. It’s always going to be there to support me.

Have you done any other performances that are like this—in the contemporary art realm, as opposed to performing arts, on a stage with a seated audience?

No, I’ve never performed when it’s called contemporary visual art. I’ve done things that are more along the lines of visual architecture or improvisations that had minimalistic movement parameters. This is something more in-depth. This performance has been different in that it’s just me and that structure. Every time I’ve done it, it’s gotten a bit more involved. Most of the time you don’t get to dive into a piece, you just have your weekend of performances.

Have you ever had to do something multiple times over the course of many months?

I’m part of a dance company, Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater, so we do a lot of touring. There are three or four full-length works that I’ve done anywhere from 30 to 50 times over the span of five months on tour. Costume Made of Nothing is different because it’s the same space, the same apparatus, the same lighting, the same area, and we’re shooting for the same duration. In the work I do with Stuart Pimsler we really want to know what the audience is thinking and feeling, and in this piece, I feel very autonomous. I wonder how many people saw me perform and what they felt and thought—and I’ll never know.

Pope.L asked me to record one of your recent performances with the idea that he would send you feedback and ask you to change aspects of the piece. I wonder how Pope.L envisions the final performance.

The little I interacted with him, I got the impression that he was very respectful of my process. The last thing he said to me, which has really influenced me, was that he was going to come by at some point. In the back of my mind I didn’t think he was actually going to, but because he said that, I always perform it like maybe he will that time. I think it was part of his plan.

 

 

Brian J Evans - Head Shot

Brian J. Evans of Gaylord, MN is currently in his seventh season with Stuart Pimsler Dance & Theater. In addition to performing, he serves as the company’s Musical Director. He is a graduate of Gustavus Adolphus College, where he earned a B.A. in Liberal Arts with an emphasis in dance. In 2009, he was recognized by the Star Tribune and the following year received a SAGE Award for Outstanding Performer. He also teaches at the Saint Paul Conservatory for the Performing Arts and Young Dance, and served as Dance Program Administrator for SPDT at FAIR School Downtown. Evans has also worked with numerous directors and choreographers on productions throughout the Midwest and performed as a singer/dancer at Valley Fair, as well as appearing in a feature film.

Light & Space: Liz Deschenes’s Gallery 7

Since the early 1990s, New York–based artist Liz Deschenes has produced a singular and influential body of work that has done much to advance photography’s material potential and critical scope. Making use of the medium’s most elemental aspects, namely paper, light, and chemicals, she has recently worked without a camera to produce mirrored photograms that […]

Installation view

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, 2014

Since the early 1990s, New York–based artist Liz Deschenes has produced a singular and influential body of work that has done much to advance photography’s material potential and critical scope. Making use of the medium’s most elemental aspects, namely paper, light, and chemicals, she has recently worked without a camera to produce mirrored photograms that reflect viewers’ movements in time and space. Her carefully calibrated installations of these pieces have probed disparate histories of image production, abstraction, and exhibition-making while also responding to a given site’s unique features.

On November 22, the Walker Art Center opens its newest exhibition, Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, with a gallery talk and reception at 2 pm co-hosted by mnartists.org. For this yearlong installation, Deschenes has transformed the space of the Walker’s seventh-floor gallery with a photographic intervention. Eliminating the room’s temporary architecture to reveal its east-facing windows, she has allowed natural light into the space and installed a series of free-standing rectangular panels. These large-scale abstractions, which occupy the space of the viewer more than the conventional space of the photograph, result from the artist’s distinctive silver-toned photogram process as well as her new experiments in digital pigment printing on acrylic.

Installation view

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, 2014

Deschenes produces her photograms by exposing sheets of photosensitive paper to the ambient light of night before washing them with silver toner—a process contingent on temperature and humidity. The resulting images offer a foggy, mirrored cast, reflecting the viewers who encounter them as well as the spatial context of their display. Since these materials are prone to oxidation, her photograms “develop” slowly over time, changing color and sheen.

More recently, Deschenes has begun to employ digital pigment printing on acrylic to produce large blue monochromes that can be viewed in the round. Her chosen colors are derived from the printing industry’s Blue Wool Scale, a professional standard used by conservators to gauge the lightfastness of pigments ranging from textile dyes to oil paint. With a surface not unlike the texture of ground glass, these new pieces capture and refract incidental light, suggesting a photographic calibration of the gallery’s space.

Installation view of Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, 2014

The temporal and spatial implications of these two imaging processes—one alchemical and reflective, the other digital and absorptive—find a particular context within the history of the Walker and its seventh-floor gallery. Her title for the exhibition, Gallery 7, which is the former name for the current Medtronic Gallery, orients us toward the past. Architect Edward Larrabee Barnes’s original designs for the Walker’s 1971 building and curator Lucy Lippard’s 1973 group show c. 7,500, featuring work by an all-women roster of conceptual artists, were important points of departure for Deschenes’s intervention here. Finally, the artist has chosen to fit the space of her installation with a picture-hanging rail system reminiscent of the one used in the Walker’s now demolished 1927 building, further collapsing the institution’s spatial histories of site and display.

Installation view of the exhibition 92 Artists, Walker Art Center, June 1943 (Long & Thorshov, architects, 1927)

Installation view of the exhibition 92 Artists, Walker Art Center, June 1943 (Long & Thorshov, architects, 1927)

Cross-sectional drawing of the Walker Art Center auditorium and galleries, circa 1969 (Edward Larrabee Barnes, architect, 1971)

Cross-sectional drawing of the Walker Art Center auditorium and galleries, circa 1969 (Edward Larrabee Barnes, architect, 1971)

Exterior view, Walker Art Center terraces, circa May 1971 (Edward Larrabee Barnes, architect, 1971)

Exterior view, Walker Art Center terraces, circa May 1971 (Edward Larrabee Barnes, architect, 1971)

Installation view of the exhibition c. 7,500, curated by Lucy Lippard, Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, November 1973

Installation view of the exhibition c. 7,500, curated by Lucy Lippard, Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, November 1973

Installation view

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, 2014

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, November 2014

Installation view of the exhibition Liz Deschenes: Gallery 7, Walker Art Center, 2014

Recently described by the New York Times as “one of the quiet giants of post-conceptual photography,” Liz Deschenes has exhibited her work regularly since receiving her BFA in 1988 from the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. She has recently mounted exhibitions at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; Campoli Presti, London and Paris; Secession, Vienna; and Sutton Lane, Paris and Brussels. Featured in the 2012 Whitney Biennial, she is most recently the recipient of the 2014 Rappaport Prize awarded by the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum. Her work is represented in the collections of the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Since 2006, she has been a member of the faculty of Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont.

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