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A King’s Horizon

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today,  filmmaker and writerJustin Schell shares his perspective on Dave King’s Sound Horizon performance Thursday night. Agree or […]

King

Dave King. Photo: Justin Schell

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today,  filmmaker and writerJustin Schell shares his perspective on Dave King’s Sound Horizon performance Thursday night. Agree or disagree? Feel free to share your thoughts in comments!

Dave King opened this year’s installment of Sound Horizon, the Walker’s amalgamation of music, visual art, and space. This year’s series is curated by Jim Hodges, in conjunction with his Give More Than You Take exhibition. King, a Minneapolis native best known for his work with The Bad Plus and Happy Apple, played three sets in different parts of the gallery, first on drums, second on electronics, and third on a grand piano. (I was only able to stay for the first set.)

In a refreshing change, the first set was in the brightly lit, white-walled Perlman Gallery, as opposed to previous shows in the series, which were often dark and whose lighting went more for atmosphere than definition. The half-hour set was taken up mostly by a single piece, with a little coda at the end. The sounds of King’s drums ricocheted throughout the space, as he used nearly every inch of his Ellis set with his hands and a variety of sticks. As King bounced up and down on his stool,  melodies emerged in scattered time signatures through cymbals, bass, snare, and toms. Soon the toys came out (King mentioned one affinity between himself and Hodges is the creation of art from found objects), including the well-known apple as well as a toy megaphone dragged across the drum heads, all above a squeezing, creaking ostinato made by rubbing the floor tom with a stick. The set’s coda was a short piece that started around a more conventional brush pattern and ended with him pressing down (hard) against the floor tom head, again giving his drums that creaking sound that, this time, sounded like breathing, or perhaps moving joints, the energy and movement from King’s arms and legs transmuted into the drums themselves.

Sculpting Sound: Dave King and Jim Hodges’ Sound Horizon

On March 6, the galleries of Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take will be filled with the sounds of renowned local drummer/composer/“restless creator” Dave King. A Twin Cities native, King is perhaps best known for his work with jazz groups Happy Apple (with Michael Lewis and Erik Fratzke) and The Bad Plus (with Ethan […]

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Dave King. Photo courtesy the artist

On March 6, the galleries of Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take will be filled with the sounds of renowned local drummer/composer/“restless creatorDave King.

A Twin Cities native, King is perhaps best known for his work with jazz groups Happy Apple (with Michael Lewis and Erik Fratzke) and The Bad Plus (with Ethan Iverson and Reid Anderson). But King’s musical scope is broad and his playing versatile; he has performed and recorded with so many bands that the Belles of Skin City wrote a song called “Hey, Dave King, Leave Some for the Rest of Us.” His ubiquity provides seemingly endless fodder for the local music scene, so much so that it prompted this City Pages headline last year: “Happy Apple’s Dave King: I’m not in 99 bands.”

King is no stranger to the Walker. He and fellow members of yet another one of his bands, Golden Valley is Now, were regular attendees at the Walker’s rock and jazz shows in the 1980s. “We were these die-hard kids in the front row,” King said. “That place played a huge role in how I chose what I wanted to do.”

Over the past 15 years or so, King himself has been a source of inspiration for the next wave of Walker audiences. He has played numerous Walker events dating back to the late 1990s (for one of Happy Apple’s earliest gigs) to numerous Music and Movies appearances (in bands like Blood Magnet, Iffy, and Halloween, Alaska) to the Rock the Garden stage in 2003 (when The Bad Plus opened for Wilco). And in 2010, the McGuire Theater was home to King for Two Days, a weekend-long celebration of his work. The mini-festival featured bands Buffalo Collision, The Bad Plus, and Happy Apple, and marked the debut of Golden Valley Is Now and Dave King Trucking Company.

As part of the 2014 Sound Horizon series, King returns this Thursday evening to perform three short sets, each in a different location within the galleries of Give More Than You Take. King says his 30-minute performances will contain “many varying themes and set-ups all inspired by the breadth of Jim’s show.”

Hodges himself curated this year’s Sound Horizon series, which also includes sets by Shelley Hirsch (April 10) and Kevin Beasley (May 8). King has long been a fan of Hodges’ work, but this inspiration became personal when the two met last year after King played in a show with Craig Taborn here at the Walker. The two artists connected immediately, or “had an instantly easy vibe as personalities” (King’s words). Since their introduction, Hodges has attended King’s shows in New York, and King in turn has visited the artist’s studio. This increased familiarity with Hodges’ work has had a real impact on King:

Jim’s imagination, openness, earnestness and keen mind are all things that inspire me. I feel challenged by his ability to do heavy things with the lightest touch. This idea of the multiple possibilities of things is something my work tends to attempt to explore. Also the idea of many varieties of touch and discipline appeals to me greatly and Jim is a great master at this.

Hodges explained that he is equally as inspired by King’s music and process, calling him a “sculptor of sound.” Hodges also cited “an affinity to his energetic broad spectrum and sensitivity” as further reasons why he invited King to take part in Sound Horizon. Sensitivity is a quality these artists share, both creating a subtle balance between hard and soft. This Thursday we’ll get to see just how King’s musical sculptures compare to Hodges’ physical ones around him.

Dave King will perform in the Walker galleries on Thursday, March 6 at 6, 7, and 8 pm. Admission is free.

 

 

The Decorative Raw

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today, Penelope Freeh shares her perspective on Thursday night’s OTRO TEATRO by luciana achugar Agree or disagree? […]

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luciana achugar. Photo: Gene Pittman, Walker Art Center

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today, Penelope Freeh shares her perspective on Thursday night’s OTRO TEATRO by luciana achugar Agree or disagree? Feel free to share your thoughts in comments!

An environment establishes itself, a humid one, where humans recline and shed their skins like reptiles.

For a long while there is a lone figure onstage, wearing a sparkling fabric overhead, draping to the knees. The figure circles and chants, and slowly we discern that some, from their seats among us, are joining this incantation. Sympathetic responses emit yawns and stretches, deliberately just louder than usual. There is a meditative quality as the tempo increases. The figure retreats upstage. Against the back wall a new texture takes hold, a rumbling that causes the feet to shimmer, ambulating the figure forward again, toward us.

This episode takes place three times, accumulatively lasting about a half an hour. With each repeat the passage imprints itself more deeply onto the world. It rocks it.

The figure reveals her red-streaked nakedness. This reads like war paint and ties together the notions of primal and ritualized, raw and decorative. She begins a reclining solo, sensuous and curvy. I don’t detect pleasure per se, but a kind of indulgence, a relishing.

Another figure has slowly made its way across the back, also shrouded. The two form a stacked image, a unison squatting with a side-to-side motion that brings them together. They draw upwards and sway in circles, connected and chanting anew.

A woman in street clothes gets drawn into the mix and it feels like an abduction, so incongruous is this new presence compared to the context we’ve come to know. She is manipulated into the space, performing a sleepy, dreamy standing tumble. Eventually she makes her way upstage and frames a corner where floor and wall meet, slowly extending her long legs and shape shifting as she reclines.

Over the course of the rest of this long work performers keep adding in. Bodies, in various states of undress, accumulate to respectively experience for themselves and elaborate upon movement motifs. There’s a walk on all fours: hands slide out, feet slide in, hands release, hands slide out, feet slide in, hands release…There’s “legs against the wall”: either slowly and experimentally extending/lifting/lengthening or releasing and flinging back hard, hips thrusting. There’s an extra-wide second position grande plie gyration. There’s hip thrusting relocation. There’s step leaping into a wall, run back, repeat.

At the height of this visual and aural cacophony a performer sets about unrolling tape onto the back wall. The design has straight and articulate lines traversing the wall’s entire length. As bodies conglomerate into a spread-out pile center stage, tape encroaches upon the floor. Shapes become 3D, portals are formed, entrances or exits.

The house lights come up, there is a brief smattering of applause, and slowly, the audience starts to leave. I stay awhile, watching as many performers add in to the taping of the space. Wall and floor meet, horizontal and vertical. Straight shapes and round bodies intersect, worlds collide. The ecosystem that was this piece bleeds into starts to feel like a post-show moment. Performers release their performativeness and relate in more quotidian ways.

There are all kinds of blurry in this work and the end is no exception. Eventually I make my way away, assured that I witnessed an endpoint of sorts and that the art still goes on, even as the theater clears.

OTRO TEATRO by luciana achugar runs through March 1 in the McGuire Theater.

Talk Dance: luciana achugar on OTRO TEATRO

Talk Dance is a podcast series devoted to in-depth conversations with dance artists produced and hosted by local dancer, educator, and commentator Justin Jones. In this installment, Jones speaks with Uruguayan/New York-based choreographer luciana achugar, whose Walker-commissioned piece OTRO TEATRO will have its world premiere at the Walker February 27-March 1 . Listen to the […]

luciana achugar

achugar’s new work is inspired, in part, by the idea of an abandoned, crumbling theater. Photo: Matt Lambros

Talk Dance is a podcast series devoted to in-depth conversations with dance artists produced and hosted by local dancer, educator, and commentator Justin Jones. In this installment, Jones speaks with Uruguayan/New York-based choreographer luciana achugar, whose Walker-commissioned piece OTRO TEATRO will have its world premiere at the Walker February 27-March 1 . Listen to the entire podcast here.

Talking with luciana achugar was fascinating. Her thinking unravels in layers, one connected to the other, sometimes digging deeper, sometimes sliding sideways, always moving forwards. Editing our hour of conversation about her upcoming premiere, OTRO TEATRO, into a busy-schedule-friendly 20 minutes was a challenge. Each edit made me a little sad.

One interesting detail (especially for Walker Art Geeks like myself), that I had to cut for time, was a connection luciana made between OTRO TEATRO, which she imagines beginning in the rubble of a decrepit and decaying theater, and the work of Argentinian visual artist, Guillermo Kuitca, whose series of paintings, 32 seating plans, incorporates laser printed images of seating plans of famous theaters that have been treated with water. A retrospective of Kuitca’s work entitled, “Everything” was in the Walker Galleries in 2010. As she said, “It speaks to a kind of way of making theater or a history of … the codes that we go by when we put theater or dance in the theater, and I liked this idea of it melting or collapsing or shifting … it relates to the world we’re living in right now and how it feels to me that the system we’re living in, our establishment, doesn’t feel like it can hold. It feels like it needs to soften and be a bit more flexible and shift its structures.”

What struck me most as I edited was how fully luciana integrates her ideas into her dance making process. I have the sense that it is her aim to take the conceptual, theoretical, ideological thinking she has around her work, and put it directly onto her skin, into her blood, bones, fascia. As she writes on her website, “…with a brain that melted down to the skin, the flesh, the bones, the guts, and the crotch… and with eyes that see without naming and see without knowing.”

Hear the rest of Jones’ conversation with achugar on the Walker Channel.

OTRO TEATRO takes place Thursday-Saturday, February 27-March 1, at 8pm in the Walker’s McGuire Theater.

An Inspired Translation: Sisyphus’ Take on Jim Hodges

This weekend marked the opening of Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take, an exhibition of 25 years of work by sculptor/installation artist Jim Hodges. Made using flowers and scarves, chains and denim, his pieces transform everyday objects into quietly emotive reflections on life and love. As a part of the celebration of Hodges’ art, […]

Sufjan Stevens performing with Sisyphus at the Walker, February 14, 2014. All photos by Courtney Perry

Sufjan Stevens performing with Sisyphus at the Walker, February 14, 2014. Photo: Courtney Perry

This weekend marked the opening of Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take, an exhibition of 25 years of work by sculptor/installation artist Jim Hodges. Made using flowers and scarves, chains and denim, his pieces transform everyday objects into quietly emotive reflections on life and love. As a part of the celebration of Hodges’ art, musical group Sisyphus was commissioned to create work inspired by Hodges. And inspired they were: their self-titled LP  — with a cover featuring a piece by Hodges — will be released on March 18.

On Saturday, all voices in the project were brought together for an opening day dialogue. In her introduction, Olga Viso, the Walker’s Executive Director and exhibition co-curator, provided a helpful identification of the many parties involved: artist Jim Hodges, the musicians of Sisyphus (Sufjan Stevens, Son Lux, and Serengeti), their co-commissioners (the Walker and the SPCO’s Liquid Music series), and the host that afternoon, Bill Arning of Contemporary Arts Museum Houston.

In his introduction of the artist, Arning recalled a quote of Hodges’ that framed the Sisyphus collaboration and their discussion that afternoon: “Art without music makes no sense.” Later, Hodges elaborated on this idea and the universality of music. “Music is the primary art source,” he explained, “the connectedness that runs through everyone.” It also serves as a personal inspiration for Hodges. Single artists or tracks (including some by Sufjan Stevens) become a through line in his process, their sound providing continuity within the studio as he works on a piece.

Bill Arning, Jim Hodges, Sufjan Stevens, Serengeti, Son Lux

Bill Arning, Jim Hodges, Sufjan Stevens, Serengeti, Son Lux. Photo: Gene Pittman

This collaboration turned this order of inspiration around. Arning asserted that “visual art is a catalyst,” sparking a dialogue by asking questions: “Do you see what I see? Do you get what I get from it?” As the members of Sisyphus meditated on Hodges’ work, this dialogue took a musical form through the melding of their distinct voices. With the creation of this album, these artists’ exchange on Hodges work is made permanent, the album a sonic manifestation of a shared reaction to a set of visual art.

It took a few steps for Sisyphus’ work with Hodges to fall into place; Stevens admitted he didn’t remember exactly how it happened. The Walker approached Hodges about collaborating with a musician, Hodges recommended Stevens, and a friend of his suggested he work on this project with Son Lux and Serengeti. (The three had previously released music as s/s/s). Eventually, Sisyphus found themselves in Hodges’ studio, admiring past and current work. That day, perhaps an auspicious omen, all four men were wearing camouflage, a common motif in Hodges’ pieces.

During the dialogue, the musicians of Sisyphus recalled what they found so compelling about Hodges’ work. Stevens was inspired by a “unique earnestness” and an “absence of irony,” qualities rare in life and art today. Sisyphus set out to emulate this emotional purity in their own work. Ryan Lott (Son Lux) believes that Hodges’ art looks inward without reservations or judgments. By being openly introspective, we also open ourselves up to others, the personal investigation also serving the interpersonal.

This inward reflection unites the work of Hodges and Sisyphus. At their most basic, Sisyphus’ music and Hodges’ art deal with the same questions; the idea of loss (of love, of life, of simplicity) is prevalent in both. As Stevens reminded the audience, “everyone here is going to die.” But, as Lott explained, they are both walking through this loss and fear and looking to the future. The treatment of these “heavy” subjects on the album (addiction, anxiety, alienation) “has a glimmer to it.”

After Hour partiers join Sisyphus on stage in the Walker's Garden Terrace Room.

After Hour partiers join Sisyphus on stage in the Walker’s Garden Terrace Room. Photo: Courtney Perry

These artists are from different generations and work in different media, so this sense of hope takes on very different forms. Hodges’ balance of growth and decay, natural and urban is soft and reflective – a favorite piece of mine consists of a set of flower sketches on napkins. Sisyphus, however, is anything but understated. During their performance as a part of the Walker’s After Hours party, their in-your-face beats dominated the Garden Terrace Room as they invited partygoers to join them onstage. As they sang “Calm It Down,” fists pumped and hips swung as a physical remedy to the mental distress the song describes.

Similarly at odds with the tranquility in Hodges work is Sisyphus’ video “Alcohol,” which opened the dialogue. The video was presented without context, and I’ll admit that I was a little put off when it began. The rapid fire, pixelated pop culture felt uninspired after viewing Hodges’ work. By the end, however, I became wholly engrossed, especially in the juxtaposition of images of life and death that became less subtle as the video went on. While dealing with the same subjects as Hodges, Sisyphus is explicit and brazen in their treatment.

In an interview with Olga Viso, Hodges explained that there is a “problem with interpretation and translation from one form to another, when in fact the form of the original is set and specific. Translating it changes it and can leave it behind.”  In Sisyphus’ interpretation and translation of his work, changes certainly do arise as the volume is turned way, way up. But their shared message ensures that Hodges’ intent is not left completely behind.

luciana achugar: Cultivating Communal Vibrations

Focusing on energy and vibrations in space, the Walker-commissioned OTRO TEATRO will extend choreographer luciana achugar‘s philosophies surrounding dance and the female form. The Uruguayan-born, New York–based artist incorporates notions of collective experience and ritualized movement, bringing performer and audience together. A professional dancer and choreographer for nearly two decades, achugar will premiere OTRO TEATRO […]

Photo: Gene Pittman

Photo: Gene Pittman, Walker Art Center

Focusing on energy and vibrations in space, the Walker-commissioned OTRO TEATRO will extend choreographer luciana achugar‘s philosophies surrounding dance and the female form. The Uruguayan-born, New York–based artist incorporates notions of collective experience and ritualized movement, bringing performer and audience together. A professional dancer and choreographer for nearly two decades, achugar will premiere OTRO TEATRO at the Walker on February 27.

Throughout her career achugar has embraced dance as a means to create a sense of communal awareness. Intentionally spelling her name without capital letters to diminish hierarchical power, her choreography reflects the same passion for equity –her work lacking the traditional, established soloist roles. She told Curator Michèle Steinwald that she believes “everything should be a collective.”


Homogenizer Hybrid, Canada, January 2004

OTRO TEATRO will expand upon the feminist perspective achugar presents in her compositions. She challenges socially constructed standards of beauty and elevates the female form by concentrating on movement from the pelvis. The women in her 2004 piece A Super Natural Return to Love wore blue factory uniform smocks, storing red paint in the pockets that leaked through, and was later spread onto the white set backdrop. Celebrating the female experience, achugar’s work focuses on the sensuality – not sexuality – and pleasure of movement and the body. Her development of feminine expression aims to channel energies and cultivate communal vibrations.

achugar draws on the use of ritualized sound and movement to encourage a social bond between the audience and the performers. Patterned and repetitive sequences strengthen and clarify the dancers’ emotional intent, and empower the audience to actively engage with the performance. Recurring sounds construct an otherworldly, meditative space in which the choreography comes to life.

For her 2010 work PURO DESEO, she composed a dark and haunting duet with long-time collaborator and OTRO TEATRO set designer Michael Mahalchick, utilizing repetition of sound and action to articulate “performance as an incantation.” A spiritual tone resonates through many of her works. In PURO DESEO, both male and female voices alternately sing short, insistent melodies reminiscent of the chants of Tibetan monks. A single bell rings again and again, vibrating like the singing bowls historically used in Eastern meditation and healing practices. As achugar and Mahalchick pace, crawl, and reach upward across the dimly lit stage, a mysterious and dark energy vigorously appears.


PURO DESEO, The Kitchen, May 2010

Integrating a performance’s surroundings also affects the relationship between vibration and energy exchange. Steinwald wrote of achugar’s productions, “Each completed work takes on a ceremonial tone, acknowledging the agreement, we as audiences and artists have together, within the inhabited theatrical experience.” Like attending a church service that allows the congregation to share the same space physically and mentally, achugar endeavors to create an environment that both performer and spectator occupy, transferring energy to one another. OTRO TEATRO, for example, will metaphorically take place “in the ruins of a collapsed theater.” This work will actualize the performance space into which we, the viewers, will enter and participate.

An exploration of movement, sound, and perception, achugar’s OTRO TEATRO will provide a window into feminist expression in a vibratory landscape. Her past works’ engagement of the spiritual mind and imagination has redirected rhythmic and ordinary elements to produce meaningful, provocative exchanges. Continuing in a tradition of experimental and socially aware choreography, the ritualized patterns and communal consciousness that have served achugar so well will lay the foundation for her upcoming world premiere.

luciana achugar’s OTRO TEATRO opens February 27–March 1, 2014 at 8 pm in the McGuire Theater.

A Look Across the Sea: Olga Bell at the Walker

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today,  filmmaker and writer Justin Schell shares his perspective on Olga Bell: Origin/Outcome. Agree or […]

Olga Bell. Photo courtesy the artist.

Olga Bell. Photo courtesy the artist.

To spark discussion, the Walker invites local artists and critics to write overnight reviews of our performances. The ongoing Re:View series shares a diverse array of independent voices and opinions; it doesn’t reflect the views or opinions of the Walker or its curators. Today,  filmmaker and writer Justin Schell shares his perspective on Olga Bell: Origin/Outcome. Agree or disagree? Feel free to share your thoughts in comments!

So much media right now is about showing images of Russia, from the Sochi Olympic Opening Ceremonies to the ethnographic (and often condescending) puff pieces about “the Russian people” that form much of NBC’s Olympics coverage. Whether or not the timing of the Olympics factored into the decision to program the world premiere of Olga Bell’s Krai last night at the Walker, the ideas, sounds, words, and images of her work all seemed to deal with questions of mediated representations of faraway lands.

The first half of the performance started this theme, which comprised a set of music by Angel Deradoorian, a collaborator with Bell who was also in The Dirty Projectors. The highlight of the set came right off the bat, a premiere of Deradoorian’s Duduk for Two Voices, an unaccompanied vocal duet meant to evoke the Armenian duduk woodwind instrument. Bell and Deerodorian started in unison and drifted around various scales, filigreed melody lines that always seemed to find their way back home to unison. After this, a whole band came out and Bell took her place amongst a trio of backup singers. It was hard to understand most of Deradoorian’s lyrics, as they were delivered in a fairly low vocal range and blended perhaps too well with the other vocal and instrumental lines. However, these pieces also showed Deradoorian’s compositional skills in both her creative use of harmony (especially how she interacted with the other vocalists) and her creative use of scales in creating melody lines. As my friend put it, the music went from Armenia to the blues to the Beatles, sometimes in the span of a few phrases.

Olga Bell took center-stage for the second half of the performance, which was the world premiere of Krai. Each of the piece’s nine movements represents a specific geographic area, or krai, in Russia.

The music Bell created for Krai is fascinating. While the text is in Russian (and becomes inscrutable without the proper language knowledge), the music had wisps of melodic and other musical styles that place it within various Russian sonic traditions, including a particularly nice use of a digital octave displacer by Bell that gave her a characteristic “Russian bass” voice. Jumping between time signatures and interweaving melodic lines (sometimes a duet between Bell and guitarist Grey McMurray, others between Bell and the multiple backup vocalists), the music couldn’t be placed or pigeonholed as easily “Russian,” reflecting her own musical journey since she left Russia at an early age.

I can imagine, though, competing (and perhaps contradictory) interpretations of Krai. Sonically, the piece evokes much more complex musical histories of mixing, change, and an embrace and evocation of ideas of tradition. The poetry and visuals, however, seem pretty conventional, offering a relatively uncomplicated view of Russia. 

The visuals felt like they could’ve been part of the Sochi Olympics Opening Ceremony. (Music like this, however, would never be in an Olympic Ceremony, as it’s far too adventurous.) The visuals were mostly of the “God’s Eye View” variety of mountains, cities, and landscapes. Many were sweeping time lapses, be they Koyaanisqatsi sped-up traffic flows or hyperreal HDR timelapses through the night (where the stars and the land can be seen equally illuminated). Often times the direction changed (sometimes forward, sometimes reverse, making the landscape look like it was breathing), images were overlaid upon each other (as happened in the piece’s final movement, “Kamchatka Krai”), or artfully blurred and distorted.This last point makes me think of the haziness of memory and how images of a home (whether it be a house, a city, or a country) can become distorted and changed the longer you’re away from it. 

The lyrics of Krai seem straight out of 19th century folklore traditions, with idealized figures of Cossacks riding through the countryside, poetic descriptions of the taiga, and an overall feeling of “Mother Russia” that doesn’t match the complexity of vision that Bell’s music put forth. This isn’t exactly a criticism. Really, it’s fairly common in the artistic realm of diaspora to idealize the place you left that you also call home. Bell candidly wrote in her program note that she “traveled” to these krai only through the mediated sounds and images from things like Radio Moscow tapes and RuTube videos, as well as, perhaps crucially, her mother’s words. (She was in the audience last night and, at one point, boisterously approved of her daughter’s work, eliciting a big laugh from Bell.) Works like Krai that engage with ideas of homeland and heritage always have to strike a balance, part reality and part invention. Bell’s exploration of her own (mediated) homeland perhaps tried to evoke this balance in the work’s different aesthetic components, yet the overpowering nature of the poetry and the visuals tipped the scales more towards invention than reality.

Watch: “Alcohol,” a New Music Video by Sisyphus

Sisyphus (formerly s/s/s) — the combined musical talents of Sufjan Stevens, Son Lux, and Serengeti — released its new music video, “Alcohol,” Friday at Vogue.com. Created by John Gilpin, Grey Gordon, and Hannah Riffe, the video is political-minimal-maximal-liminal-clinical-credible-odd-intellectual… a sensory overload that leaves the viewer always one split second behind. The images range from mundane to […]

Sisyphus (formerly s/s/s) — the combined musical talents of Sufjan Stevens, Son Lux, and Serengeti — released its new music video, “Alcohol,” Friday at Vogue.com.

Created by John Gilpin, Grey Gordon, and Hannah Riffe, the video is political-minimal-maximal-liminal-clinical-credible-odd-intellectual… a sensory overload that leaves the viewer always one split second behind. The images range from mundane to evocative and obscure to ubiquitous, giving rise to a mental game: how many can you recognize? (Did you spot Walker Senior Performing Arts Curtor Philip Bither with Kate Nordstrum of the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and Bryce Dessner of The National? How about Walker Director Olga Viso). Restless, weighty lyrics pair with the rapid-fire images, evoking many potential associations and interpretations. “Expression repression submission,” gas masks, 9/11, Martha Stewart, self-immolation, Pope Francis, horse head masks, “he sucked out my soul with the devil’s integrity,” Miley Cyrus, the Berlin Holocaust memorial, Audrey Hepburn, the Challenger disaster, Diana Nyad’s Cuba-to-Florida swim, “depression repression obsession,” newborn babies, Taylor Swift, Elvis Presley, Afghanistan and Iraq… all coming back to alcohol alcohol alcohol alcohol. What stories do you see and hear?

Sisyphus made a cameo appearance at the Walker Friday night for the After Hours opening of Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take. “Alcohol” is from the trio’s new self-titled album, which was inspired in part by Hodges’ work and commissioned by the Walker Art Center and the SPCO’s Liquid Music series (the group’s name is, in part, a nod to Hodges’ Untitled boulders on the Walker hillside). The album will be released officially on March 18, 2014.

“Reckoning with my Russianness”: Olga Bell on Origin/Outcome

“I really love when something is so fully focused, so rooted in what it is that it can reach out for its cardinal opposite,” explained composer/vocalist/instrumentalist Olga Bell to The Examiner. “I love thinking about opposites and extremes… I don’t think it’s a motto or a philosophy per se, but it’s a pretty reliable wellspring […]

Olga_Bell_2014_013_W

“I really love when something is so fully focused, so rooted in what it is that it can reach out for its cardinal opposite,” explained composer/vocalist/instrumentalist Olga Bell to The Examiner. “I love thinking about opposites and extremes… I don’t think it’s a motto or a philosophy per se, but it’s a pretty reliable wellspring for ideas.”

This wide focus has proved fruitful for Bell, as she keeps busy through a variety of musical outlets. Bell is a member of avant-rock group Dirty Projectors, half of duo Nothankyou with Tom Vek, and a mixer and matcher of beats (check out her seriously awesome annual year-end mixes). Her solo album Diamonite, released in 2011 under the name BELL, is made up of intricate electronic pop songs with an edge. In “Chase No Face,” inspired by the true story of a horribly disfigured cat, Bell’s delivery goes from a cool to powerful as she warns: “I am a lion. / Don’t make me sound my roar!”

Bell, who was born in Russia and raised in Alaska, was strictly a classical musician through college, studying piano at the New England Conservatory. After rethinking her plan to attend graduate school for performance, she relocated to New York, where she played piano for a theater production company, interviewed to become an MTV News anchor, and began playing some solo shows that became bigger and longer with time.

Now, Bell finds herself performing and recording with Dirty Projectors. A self-professed fan girl of the band, she knew their intricate vocal lines long before meeting any of the members. Eventually, a spot opened up in the band, and she was put into contact with singer and writer Dave Longstreth. Her fan status was put to good use, and after some whirlwind rehearsing, she began performing with the group. She told The Examiner, “After coming from a classical background where it’s not uncommon to practice or rehearse for many, many hours a day very meticulously, dissecting, interpreting and committing to memory someone else’s vision — a composer’s score — it seemed really natural to just dive and sink my teeth into this music that I had been such a big fan of.”

At the Walker next week, Bell presents Origin/Outcome, a celebration of the past and its relation to her musical present. A highlight of the evening is the world premiere of Krai, a multi-movement homage to Russia. One of Krai’s many definitions is “edge,” and this work exists on the border of many styles. Bell has referred to it as “semi-classical,” but it features electronics and Russian folk idioms such as throat singing. The piece is perhaps the most personal outcome of her many musical leanings.

Through her work with Dirty Projectors, Bell has also gained a collaborator. Angel Deradoorian, whom Bell replaced in the band, was a long-time member and is an active solo artist. She joins Origin/Outcome as a special guest, supporting Bell in Krai. In turn, Bell will lend her voice and fingers to a set of Deradoorian’s music, which similarly reflects on Deradoorian’s Armenian heritage.

In anticipation of the show, Bell took the time to answer a few questions about Krai, her influences, and her work with Deradoorian.

Chris Mode: How did you begin working with Angel? Do both of your experiences in Dirty Projectors affect your work together?

Olga Bell: I loved Angel’s work in DPs. As a fan, I became really familiar with her voice and her parts on Bitte Orca. I felt we had a similar range. I met her a few times and fan-gushed all over her, but I’m not sure she really remembered who I was until I joined Dirty Projectors. Now we’re IRL friends, and I’m really excited to perform with her.

I feel I’m a much better musician after just two years in that band, and Angel was in it for something like six? I don’t think it’s possible to participate in a band that intense and come away unchanged, so, speaking for myself, I feel it’s been really beneficial, personally and professionally.

Mode: You have spoken before about your wide array of musical interests and influences. What role does classical music play in your life versus pop music? Is there even a difference?

Bell: I think everyone should listen to some of everything. I mean, there’s definitely a difference between the kind of feeling I get from an Earl Sweatshirt record versus the kind of feeling I get from a Harry Christophers record, but I love both artists. I love things that are rigorous; I love music that I can’t figure out immediately. I’ve always thought making music was a lot like cooking, and almost everything in cooking benefits from reaching for a little of its opposite, like salt in cookies. I think it’s a great technical accomplishment to work within a strict form or set of limitations, but I’m most interested in producing (and consuming) the crazy collisions, things that are surprising and unprecedented.

Mode: What can you tell us about Krai? How does it relate to your other music?

Bell: Krai is very different from anything I’ve released before. For one thing it’s all written-out and, except for vocals and keyboards, performed by other musicians. It’s much closer to “formal” composition, to the composition I did as a kid, which was entirely for acoustic instruments, as opposed to my “pop” releases of the past few years, which have relied heavily on software sound generators. Krai is also heavily programmatic, which is a new thing for me. I didn’t set any formal constraints on the writing, and there’s no specific story I’m trying to put across, but everything connects in some way to what I found in these places.

Mode: The title Origin/Outcome points to a sense of progression. How does your past (musical or otherwise) manifest itself in your work?

Bell: At the heart of the Krai project is this search for some kind of Russian or more generally Slavic soul. I’m not sure if I’ve been successful at finding it, or conveying it, or if any Russians will recognize anything like that in this piece, but that’s what this has been for me. I hear it in Stravinsky’s music, I hear it in Shostakovich and Gubaidulina, and I think I understand it in Dostoyevsky or Bulgakov, but a lot of people might say I have absolutely no claim to it after living in the USA for so long. I’m proud of being Russian, but I’m never sure exactly what that means, so here’s forty minutes of me reckoning with my Russianness!

I believe Angel feels similarly close to her Armenian heritage, so the first half of the program is an homage to her ancestors’ part of the world, and the second to mine. The title seems appropriate for two American girls presenting a bunch of new music in Minneapolis in 2014.

This new music is just one trajectory of her fresh compositional voice, a path that moves ahead while keeping an ear open to the past. When asked by The Great Discontent about leaving some sort of legacy, she explained, “I guess I’d want to be remembered as someone who was curious, rigorous, prolific, and everywhere at once.” Origin/Outcome is the result of this curiosity, and luckily, “everywhere” includes a stop at the Walker to share it.

Olga Bell presents Origin/Outcome Thursday, February 13, at 8 pm in the Walker’s McGuire Theater. Copresented with the SPCO’s Liquid Music series and the American Composers Forum. Check out ACF’s interview with Bell here.

“Drone, not Drones” Sounds this Weekend at the Cedar

Low’s set at Rock the Garden last summer sparked a surprising amount of controversy for a local music performance; everyone had something to say about the 27-minute, drone-infused rendition of their “Do You Know How to Waltz?” The band received harsh backlash online, was defended ardently, and inspired questions about performers’ responsibility to their audience. […]

Low’s set at Rock the Garden last summer sparked a surprising amount of controversy for a local music performance; everyone had something to say about the 27-minute, drone-infused rendition of their “Do You Know How to Waltz?” The band received harsh backlash online, was defended ardently, and inspired questions about performers’ responsibility to their audience. Philip Bither, the Walker’s Senior Curator of Performing Arts, called it Rock the Garden’s own Rite of Spring.

Something that Low’s Alan Sparhawk said during the show, delivered more calmly and eloquently than any of their naysayers, has had a lasting impact: “Drone, not drones.” Borrowed from his friend and Twin Cities music organizer Luke Heiken, the phrase has become a succinct pro-drone, anti-war statement.

In an interview with the Walker, Heiken detailed his position on drones: “I’m told [drones] are important to track down terrorists and to keep me and my family safe,” he says. “But there is a line crossed when we fly these things into sovereign nations and use explosives to kill people, without a trial, who are believed to be present and write off the loss of life and limb for any people caught in the blast.”  He also described his plans to organize a benefit concert, fueled by the attention his cause has received from the Low set.

After months of organizing, Heiken’s dream is finally coming together in “DRONE NOT DRONES: The Live 28-Hour Drone” this weekend, February 7–8. As the event’s Facebook invite states, “We don’t have the right words to stop ‘targeted killings’ or ‘collateral damages’ or ‘illegal assassinations.’ All we can do is drone on and on about it.” And drone they will.

The drone begins early Friday evening at the Cedar Cultural Center. Proceeds from the event will go to Doctors Without Borders. By the time silence falls late Saturday night, musicians like Paul Metzger, Tim Kaiser, Zak Sally, and Martin Dosh will have contributed to the sound. And of course, after last summer’s events, a drone festival in Minneapolis isn’t complete without Low, scheduled for primetime Friday night. If you loved their RTG set, grab a blanket and pillow and head to the Cedar this weekend.

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