Blogs The Green Room Maggie Perez

Momentum: Weekend 2

Anna Marie Shogren and Eddie Oroyan’s work is so clearly made through their eyes. I feel like each of them cut a very very thin slice of each of their experiences in the world, put them on a slide and let me examine them under a microscope for 45 minutes. Sometimes they were intriguing and […]

Anna Marie Shogren and Eddie Oroyan’s work is so clearly made through their eyes. I feel like each of them cut a very very thin slice of each of their experiences in the world, put them on a slide and let me examine them under a microscope for 45 minutes. Sometimes they were intriguing and delightful, and once in a while I found myself wandering as I was studying. Perhaps part of the examination is examining myself wandering. I wonder if I am making sense…Anna Marie’s “LaBrea” felt like it compounded everyday moments in just the right way to release them in ways that let the pressure out of my head. Some of the simplest moments made all the sense in the world: Natalie Bogira comfortably wrapping her arm around the corner of a bare mattress as though she was just fine with what she could encompass, Anna Marie being dragged around on her belly as a part of an awkward razzle dazzle ‘em moment, an intricately designed trio moving from one side of the stage to another. Watching Anna Marie perform is a treat. The layers of satire, sarcasm, sincerity and smarts unfold and fold in, alternately lending her performance to utter sincerity and harsh commentary. Some of the middle bits I don’t remember. They didn’t brand themselves on my brain like other moments.Eddie’s “Brown Rocket”presented itself as a roller coaster of emotion, motion and commotion. Eddie’s movement vocabulary, as well as the sheer joy with which he and Laura Selle move separately and together, provide a lush canvas on which to paint Eddie’s intentions. Collin Sherraden’s magically clever set design, along with Danny Sigelman’s beautifully chaotic paintings defined the Southern as a new space. A few scenes stand out in my mind as particularly memorable: the couch sequence evoked many an awkward intimate moment, the opening scene in all its colorful and vivid glory and finally the end, when it all comes magically, silently crashing down. Much of the middle material was hypnotic to me due to the nature of the live music and the almost repetitive series of eternal, internal made external struggle. Again, though, I wonder as I wander. So I’m not mad that I was somewhat distracted during sections of each piece. I seem to be thinking about editing and filtering a lot these days…I’m not sure where the balance is. I will remember and savor the moments that resonated. And there weren’t a lack of these moments in both pieces.

Momentum 2008: Episode 1

Chris Schlicting’s love thingsmade me ask so many questions throughout its entirety: questions that amused, alarmed and delighted me the entire time. I wondered who these people were to me, to each other, to their world. And the answers came and kept coming. Chris deftly created a world of gesture, rhythm, intricacy, moment and image. […]

Chris Schlicting’s love thingsmade me ask so many questions throughout its entirety: questions that amused, alarmed and delighted me the entire time. I wondered who these people were to me, to each other, to their world. And the answers came and kept coming. Chris deftly created a world of gesture, rhythm, intricacy, moment and image. The dancers knew the rulesand played wisely and skillfully. Pink nail polish. Moments of air after feeling like the ceiling was caving in. Hannah and Morgan finding a moment of humanity within the world of quirky interaction. Surprises around every corner.The question I kept asking myself during the show was “Where are they?” My imagination was fed just enough to thoroughly enjoy answering this question. In a birthday cake. In a flocked garden at sunset. In a world full of excess and misdirected interactions. Somewhere where authentic moments were just around the corner. The deftly crafted ensemble sections unfolded in satisfying ways. Jessica flaunting her dance moves in a most uncomfortable way. Justin and Jessica dancing a duet of the future. Of never quite being where the dance is in a way that makes me question how I am watching.At the end of it all, I felt like Chris and his ensemble presented me a fascinating snow globe containing a world worthy of study. And I really would like to keep shaking it up to see what happens next.Maia Maiden and Ellena Schoop’s The Foundation, et ceteranot so delicately wove a series of vignettes into a commentary on generational differences in an attempt to unify and activate. Watching Anneka and Roxane is always a treat. The fast-paced structure moved in a way that made me interested in what was next, and Tiyo Siyolo and Selfish generated and performed words that came from an authentic, motivated place. Very satisfying.The evening was varied in the way the audience received it. Momentum is always good to bring people of differing training, life experience, gender, sexuality and ethnicity into a space to tell their stories, attracting different populations into the seats. I distinctly felt that these two pieces were designed to speak to very different groups. I felt included and unincluded. I think the rest of the audience felt this too. Please correct me if I’m wrong. Interesting. And troubling somehow. I don’t have any answers. Just questions. Let’s talk…

Momentum 2007

As I look back on my experience this past year working on a show for Momentum, I have the privilege of reflecting on what this program means in an individual career and our local dance community as a whole. I don’t think I have any responses to these ideas; I am just meandering through the […]

As I look back on my experience this past year working on a show for Momentum, I have the privilege of reflecting on what this program means in an individual career and our local dance community as a whole. I don’t think I have any responses to these ideas; I am just meandering through the landscape of how and where an artists makes work, who supports it, and how it is received. In a lot of cases, it seems that Momentum is like the first step down a steep hill……there’s a sense of weightlessness, your eyes get a little big when you see what you are going to do, and then your feet hit the pavement and you have to breathe really hard to make sure you can keep your legs going so that you don’t fall flat on your face. And there’s a lot of people watching you do this. And it’s scary and fun. But that’s just my opinion.

On Cathy Wright’s “Return:”

I really enjoyed the visceral movement and strong images that Cathy created throughout this piece. I did feel that she was able to truly articulate the intent of the piece through her solos. I was pleasantly disturbed by the use of the wigs and hair in Cathy’s solos. They gave me something really strong that still sits with me now as I write this. I wonder if more of the movement vocabulary could have come from this deep, deep place in Cathy’s gut. Another image that I was able to take home with me was a moment in “The Garden” when the dancers were coupled up. The movement went from gentle to violent in slow motion. The picture of all the performers in white costumes with this dichotomy of grace and harm is memorable. Overall, though, the group pieces were well-constructed and interesting, but didn’t grab me by the face like the solo work.

On Off-Leash Area’s “Our Perfectly Wonderful Lives:”

Yahoo for wheeling TV’s! I thought that this piece was also well-constructed, although I got lost a little in the movement and transition in the last third of the piece. Paul Herwig is a wonderful performer; he and Katie Kaufmann were highlights piece for me. The use of sets and stuff seemed a little excessive at times, but I suppose that this served the intent of the piece. I also liked the tin foil…..sparkly. I guess I felt really invested at the beginning of the piece, but by the time I got to the end, I knew where I was, but I wasn’t exactly sure how I got there. I would have also really liked to follow the stories of the public a little more. They were set up as fascinating characters, but faded into the darkness. Perhaps a choice once again……I guess this piece has a lot of potential for feeling less-than-fulfilled. It’s the whole point.