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Season Parallels || Last Year / This Year

Did you see a show at the Walker this past season? Are you wondering which you’d like to see this season? As interns in the department, we had the unique opportunity to see most of the 12-13 season. Taking advantage of this, while hoping to avoid oversimplifying the works too much, we’ve put our heads […]

Did you see a show at the Walker this past season? Are you wondering which you’d like to see this season? As interns in the department, we had the unique opportunity to see most of the 12-13 season. Taking advantage of this, while hoping to avoid oversimplifying the works too much, we’ve put our heads together to find connections between last year’s performances and this year’s. Here’s what we’ve come up with:

(left) The BodyCartography Project. (right) luciana achugar. Photos: Gene Pittman

(left) The BodyCartography Project. (right) luciana achugar. Photos: Gene Pittman

The Bodycartography Project || luciana achugar
The Bodycartography Project’s Super Nature presented movement inspired by animal impulses and human communication– imagine a nature documentary about people. luciana achugar takes a similar approach in OTRO TEATRO, presenting ritualistic gestures and questioning “civilized” movement.

(left) Laurie Anderson. Photo: courtesy of the artist. (right) CocoRosie. Photo: Rodrigo Jardon

(left) Laurie Anderson. Photo: courtesy of the artist. (right) CocoRosie. Photo: Rodrigo Jardon

Laurie Anderson || CocoRosie
With Dirtday!, performance artist Laurie Anderson shared personal stories, charismatic narratives, and she was not afraid to raise important questions related to feminism and contemporary politics. If you enjoyed her mix of music with politically-charged commentary, you’re bound to enjoy the fearlessly imaginative CocoRosie.

(left) Zammuto. Photo: Nick Zammuto. (right) Olga Bell. Photo: Eric Lippe

(left) Zammuto. Photo: Nick Zammuto. (right) Olga Bell. Photo: Eric Lippe

Zammuto + Eluvium || Olga Bell
Last fall, Zammuto brought us an energetic and vibrant music show filled with virtuosic riffs, auto-tuned melodies, and zebra butts. Not only does Olga Bell present an analogous sound, she approaches her performances with a similar creative intensity and playfulness.

(left) Rude Mechs. Photo: Kathi Kacinski. (right) Nature Theater of Oklahoma. Photo: courtesy of the artist

(left) Rude Mechs. Photo: Kathi Kacinski. (right) Nature Theater of Oklahoma. Photo: courtesy of the artist

Rude Mechs || Nature Theater of Oklahoma
Both Rude Mechs and Nature Theater of Oklahoma are rethinking what theater and performance are. Rude Mechs did this in The Method Gun by performing theater games, re-doing a classic, and delving into the method of a fictional acting guru. Nature Theater, instead of focusing its lens onto theater itself, looks at the life of one person from birth to the third grade. Performed through song and dance, every “um” or “like” of this woman’s story is left in. Nature Theater takes a look at speech patterns and how one person’s life, no matter how ordinary, can still be mythical and heroic. If you liked the exciting energy of the Method Gun, check out Nature Theater’s Life and Times: Episode 1.

(left) She She Pop. Photo: Doro Tuch. (right) Wunderbaum /LAPD. Photo: ©Steve Greer

(left) She She Pop. Photo: Doro Tuch. (right) Wunderbaum /LAPD. Photo: ©Steve Greer

She She Pop || Wunderbaum/LAPD
Where She She Pop tackled the real familial issue of inheritance, the performance collaboration between Wunderbaum and LAPD (Los Angeles Poverty Department) tackles the real social issue of healthcare. She She Pop’s Testament used Shakespeare’s King Lear as a starting point to talk about their own very real experiences with their fathers (who also acted on stage). Wunderbaum and LAPD’s Hospital moves between live action and film, fantasy and documentary, and actors and residents of Skid Row (some of whom appear as performers). Both combine personal stories with greater, more universal issues.

(left) Bengolea/Chaignaud/Freitas/Harrell. Photo: Vlovajob Pru. (right) Niwa Gekidan Penino. Photo: ©Shinsuke Suginou

(left) Bengolea/Chaignaud/Freitas/Harrell. Photo: Vlovajob Pru. (right) Niwa Gekidan Penino. Photo: ©Shinsuke Suginou

Bengolea/Chaignaud/Freitas/Harrell || Niwa Gekidan Penino
Raw eggs, drag operettas, and dildo dancers. (M)imosa/Twenty Looks or Paris is Burning at the Judson Church (M), from Bengolea/Chaignaud/Freitas/Harrell, was possibly the most provocative and enjoyably confusing performances of the 12-13 season. It embraced a sophisticated cultural sarcasm and challenged notions of sexuality, dance, and pop culture. Like (M)imosa, Niwa Gekidan Penino’s upcoming show, The Room Nobody Knows will likely present a comparable dosage of energetic discomfort, psychological confusion, and unpredictable excitement.

(left) Ben Frost. Photo: Bjarni Grímsson. (right) Tim Hecker/Oneohtrix Point Never. Photo: courtesy the artist

(left) Ben Frost. Photo: Bjarni Grímsson. (right) Tim Hecker/Oneohtrix Point Never. Photo: courtesy the artist

Ben Frost || Tim Hecker/Oneohtrix Point Never
In February, Ben Frost confronted us with a deeply invasive and exhilarating performance filled with incessant rhythms and foreboding sub-bass rumblings. This season presents an equally immersive equivalency: Tim Hecker and Oneohtrix Point Never. Instead of guitar drones, think abstract sound sampling and textural vintage synthesizers. Equally ground-shaking, expect this experience to be hallucinatory, sensory, and body-opening.

(left) Sarah Kirkland Snider and Shara Worden (My Brightest Diamond). Photo: Murat Eyuboglu. (right) Jherek Bischoff. Photo: Angel Ceballos

(left) Sarah Kirkland Snider and Shara Worden (My Brightest Diamond). Photo: Murat Eyuboglu. (right) Jherek Bischoff. Photo: Angel Ceballos

My Brightest Diamond || Jherek Bischoff
Last winter, Shara Worden of My Brightest Diamond mesmerized the audience with her tender serenades and powerful rock ballads. Willfully charismatic and masterfully polished, she performed emotional and colorful songs full of personal and metaphorical anecdotes. Both Worden and next season’s Jherek Bischoff exercise a compelling tension between classical and popular music traditions.

(left) Cynthia Hopkins. Photo: Ian Douglas. (right) Sam Green/Yo La Tengo. Photo: Sam Allison

(left) Cynthia Hopkins. Photo: Ian Douglas. (right) Sam Green/Yo La Tengo. Photo: Sam Allison

Cynthia Hopkins || Sam Green/Yo La Tengo
Both Hopkins and Green are storytellers. Where This Clement World presented stories about Hopkins’ own experiences in the arctic, The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller brings a documentary to the live stage. Thematically linked, the environmental tones of Hopkins’ World parallel Green and Yo La Tengo’s exploration of the work of inventor, architect, futurist, and proponent of sustainability, Buckminster Fuller. If you like stories melded with music, pick up tickets for The Love Song.

(left) Kyle Abraham. Photo: Cherylynn Tsushima. Jerome Bel/Theater Hora. Photo: courtesy of the artist

(left) Kyle Abraham. Photo: Cherylynn Tsushima. Jerome Bel/Theater Hora. Photo: courtesy of the artist

Kyle Abraham || Jerome Bel/Theater Hora
Although Kyle Abraham and Jerome Bel/Theater Hora come from different backgrounds, Live! The Realest MC and Disabled Theater both explore ideas of identity, perception, and acceptance. Both give raw emotional connections between the stage and audience, have a balance between tension and humor, and give a nod to popular culture.

Learn more about the 13/14 Performing Arts season at Philip Bither’s multimedia Season Preview tonight (September 5) at 7pm.