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Walkerart.org: The Best Stories of 2014

As I do my job as editor of the Walker homepage and blogs, I find myself guided by the Walker’s mission. The entire thing is instructive and, frankly, liberating—the dedication to both artists and audiences; the focus on the collection, care, and contextualization of art works; and the “global, multidisciplinary, and diverse approach” we take […]

As I do my job as editor of the Walker homepage and blogs, I find myself guided by the Walker’s mission. The entire thing is instructive and, frankly, liberating—the dedication to both artists and audiences; the focus on the collection, care, and contextualization of art works; and the “global, multidisciplinary, and diverse approach” we take to contemporary art. But, in particular, I’ve been focusing on the last bit of late: “Walker programs examine the questions that shape and inspire us as individuals, cultures, and communities.” Looking back on the most popular stories and blog posts we’ve produced here at the Walker, I gauge our success or failure against that measure: are we engaging not just with what’s within our walls—which we must do well—but also with what’s out there, in the world we live in when we leave work, in the world(s) our artists and audiences live in? I hope so. To help with this mission, we’ve enlisted help, from our own staff and from an array of outside voices, the many guest artists, journalists, and writers who’ve been invited, and in many cases commissioned, to share their thinking here.

Together we produced more than 70 essays, slideshows, interviews, and news stories in 2014, with help from contributors including: Ta-coumba Aiken, Kate Bernheimer & Laird Hunt, James Bridle, Nicole J. Caruth, Jeff Chang, Catherine Damman, Chris Fischbach, Kristina Fong, Shannon Gibney, Saidiya Hartman, Jeff Huebner, Julie Lasky, Martin Friedman, Joan Frosch, James Norton, Okwui Okpokwasili, Ana Tijoux, Susan Rosenberg, Joan Rothfuss, Dread Scott, and Ben Valentine, as well as the many Walker staffers who’ve shared their research and insights.

Below is a selection from our most popular articles of the past 12 months. (Click here to see the best of our blogs.) To keep up with all that we publish at walkerart.org in 2015, follow us on Twitter at @walkermag or subscribe to Walker Reader, our monthly editorial newsletter.

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Kris Martin, Bee, 2009

Kris Martin, Bee, 2009

Laugh at Death: Kris Martin on Time, Absence, and Humor

“We’re all goldfish.” In this interview from April, Belgian artist Kris Martin discusses his favorite movie scene, the goldfish scene that opens Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life, as well as his works that explore—and ridicule—death, from a cast gold bee to a 2D work in which the word “SOMEBODY” is written in human ashes (“We’re all somebody on paper.”) to For Whom … (2012), the silent swinging bell in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden that takes its name from John Donne’s famous for-whom-the-bell-tolls meditation.

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Edward Hopper, Village Person

“Hopper was a poet of the abyss, a chronicler of discontinuity and disruption, who seemed to need a static environment from which he could take inventory of what was emotionally solid and measure the distance to the nearest patch of null.” In a photoessay illustrated by Duane Michals, Julie Lasky shared her experience visiting 1 Washington Square North, Edward Hopper’s home and studio for some five decades (now home to New York University’s School of Social Work). Of the setting, she noted: “Hopper admitted the southern light from his studio windows but ignored the pleasant scene, instead consulting the anomie behind his eyelids.”

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Mickey Friedman in the Walker design studio, photo contact sheet, 1979

Mickey Friedman in the Walker design studio, photo contact sheet, 1979

Design for Explication not Veneration: Remembering Mickey Friedman

“In Mickey’s hands, a design show was never simply about a subject, but drew upon the principles and power of design itself to create a compelling experience. ” For Mildred “Mickey” Friedman, curating design was less about acquiring objects than letting such artifacts tell stories within the galleries, “not for veneration but explication,” wrote architecture and design curator Andrew Blauvelt of Friedman, who passed away Sept. 3. As Design Quarterly editor and design curator for nearly 23 years, she consistently “drew upon the power of design itself to create a compelling experience.” The wife of former Walker director Martin Friedman, she worked with Walker architect Edward Larrabee Barnes to create the building’s interiors, gave Frank Gehry a prescient solo show in 1986, and inspired a generation of designers.

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Beyoncé the Readymade: A Conversation around Ralph Lemon’s Scaffold Room

“A machine, a high-powered Porsche, hip-hop technology. She consumes everything around her.” In Ralph Lemon’s Scaffold Room (commissioned by the Walker and premiered in October), Beyoncé is discussed as an overwhelming force of capital that takes over our senses. With Lemon’s work as a jumping-off point, performer Okwui Okpokwasili met with author and Columbia scholar Saidiya Hartman to discuss the iconography and cultural consumption of black women’s bodies.

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Choreographing Experiences in Space: Olga Viso Interviews Jim Hodges

“I’m interested in theatrical moments and choreographing experiences in space. I think as a drawer and make as a sculptor.” In an interview with Walker director Olga Viso (who curated Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take), Jim Hodges discussed his art practice, life, and influences, touching on themes from love and loss to politics, spirituality, and mortality.

 

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La Cultura de la Basura: Ana Tijoux on Misogyny and Pop Music

“Where are the videos showing a woman in her role as sister—or protector, or economic head of family, or devoted daughter, or grandmother dignified in her old age?” In her Walker Artist Op-Ed, our ongoing series of opinion pieces by global artists, Chilean hip-hop MC and activist Ana Tijoux looks at la violencia del cuerpo en la musica: the objectification of female pop stars, which she likens to “visual punches: it’s about snatching away the very beauty of women.”

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The Siege on Citizenship: James Bridle on “The Right to Have Rights”

“The cloud renders geography irrelevant—until you realize that everything that matters, everything that means you don’t die, is based not only on which passport you possess, but on a complex web of definitions of what constitutes that passport.” Launching our series of Artist Op-Eds, UK-based artist and writer James Bridle shared the case of Mohamed Sakr, a man deprived of his UK citizenship and later killed by a US drone, to show how such definitions are under attack.

 

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“Hands up, don’t shoot!” Demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 12, 2014. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

“Hands up, don’t shoot!” Demonstrators protest the killing of teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 12, 2014.
Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

“Illegitimate”: Dread Scott on the Killing of Michael Brown

“If you’re the head of an empire and see that an unarmed youth is gunned down by the police and your advice is for people to be calm, your rule is illegitimate.” In an urgent essay in August, artist Dread Scott used our Artist Op-Ed platform to address the killing of Michael Brown by Ferguson, Missouri police and the crackdown on dissent that followed. Mixing anger and disbelief, he saluted protesters in Ferguson while decrying those who aim to control them through force. “If a Black boy can’t walk down the streets of his town without fear of being executed by the police,” he wrote, “what rights do we have?”

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Making the “Best Cat Video on the Internet”

“I’m a proud crazy cat video lady… trapped in a man’s body.” What does it take to make a cat video that becomes a viral sensation? Kristina Fong interviewed Will Braden, whose video Henri 2: Paw de Deux was voted “best cat video on the Internet” at the first ever Internet Cat Video Festival. Now #catvidfest curator, Braden shares his thoughts on the cat video phenomenon, as well as tips on making a videos that’ll be like catnip online.

 

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A Timeline of Design History:
Andrew Blauvelt Highlights the Best of Five Decades of Design Quarterly

For nearly fifty years, the Walker’s Design Quarterly chronicled the changing terrains of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, and product and graphic design. Featuring provocative thinkers—including Muriel Cooper, Martin Filler, and Armin Hofmann-—DQ charted design’s history, from a form-follows-function modernism of the ’40s to the affectations of postmodernism in the ’80s and ’90s.

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