Blogs Media Lab Eric Price

Introducing Media Lab and the New Walker Blogs

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs and with the release of our new website back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the redesign process as an opportunity to rebrand each […]

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs and with the release of our new website back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the redesign process as an opportunity to rebrand each of our core blogs. It was an interesting exercise and allowed us to assess the state of our collective blogging efforts – how each of our (now) nine blogs serves a different audience, how they all have different use characteristics by their audiences, and how they could all be focused into tighter streams of content. The blogs definitely represent the long tail side of our publishing efforts – lots of small bits of specialized content for micro-niche audiences – so maintaining a strong emphasis on the personalities behind the Walker and their specific interests was key. And the rebranding process illustrated for us that when you present people with tangible criteria to change, such as a new name, tighter description, graphic – an understandable format to inhabit – it helps them better speculate on what their blog can be.

We decided on a system of flag graphics to represent the various blogs, since each blog is really a representation of a different group of people at the Walker (in most cases the individual programming departments). It’s a tricky balance to strike between striving for traditional, recognizable flag forms and having a graphic that cleverly plays off the title, but we’re glad to have a consistent vocabulary to build on in the future, especially since the blogs now match our comparatively monochromatic main site. We’re particularly fond of the Green Room’s flag.

Beyond the simple graphic forms, this is the first truly responsively designed Walker site – resize your browser window to see things reflow to fit a variety of screen sizes. Content and interface elements of lesser importance become hidden behind links at certain screen sizes. The main content area, on the other hand, stretches to fill a large width when called for. It leads to some pretty long line lengths, but gives our older, image-heavy content the space it needs to fit. We’ll be soon applying this technique to the redesigned Walker Collections, which features a strong publishing component. With the easy adaptations to tablets and mobile devices, it’s a good fit for our eventual goal of efficient multi-channel communications.

Other, smaller items of note include the addition of a grid/list view toggle in the top left to make skimming easier, smarter ordering of categories and authors (by popularity and date of last post, respectively), and a fun little flag animation when you roll over the left-side blog names (in full-width view).

And just for kicks, here are some rejected flag sketches:

Walkerart.org Design Notes #1

As you’ve likely seen, we recently launched a brand new, long overdue redesign of our web presence. Olga already touched on the major themes nicely, so suffice it to say, we’ve taken a major step towards reconceptualizing the Walker as an online content provider, creating another core institutional offering that can live on its own […]

As you’ve likely seen, we recently launched a brand new, long overdue redesign of our web presence. Olga already touched on the major themes nicely, so suffice it to say, we’ve taken a major step towards reconceptualizing the Walker as an online content provider, creating another core institutional offering that can live on its own as an internationally-focused “digital Walker,” instead of something that merely serves the local, physical space.

We largely started from scratch with the user experience and design of the site; the old site, for all its merits, had started to show its age on that front, being originally designed over six years ago – an eternity in web-years. That said, we’re still traditionalists in some ways where new media design is concerned, and took a really minimal, monochromatic, print/newspaper-style approach to the homepage and article content. So in a way, it’s a unique hybrid of the old/time-tested (in layout) and new/innovative (in concept and content), hopefully all tempered by an unadorned, type-centric aesthetic that lets the variety of visuals really speak for themselves.

Our inspiration was a bit scattershot, as we tried to bridge a gap between high and low culture in a way reflective of the Walker itself. Arts and cultural sites were obviously a big part (particularly Metropolis M and it’s wonderful branded sidebar widgets), but not so much museums, which have traditionally been more conservative and promotionally-driven. With our new journalistic focus, two common touchstones became The New York Times’ site and The Huffington Post – with the space in between being the sweet spot. The former goes without saying. The latter gets a bad rap, but we were intrigued by it’s slippery, weirdly click-enticing design tricks and general sense of content-driven chaos enlivened by huge contrasts in scale. The screaming headlines aren’t pretty, but they’re tersely honest and engaging in an area where a more traditional design would introduce some distance. And the content, however vapid, is true to its medium; it’s varied and easily digestible. (See also Jason Fried’s defense of the seemingly indefensible.)

Of course, we ended up closer to the classier, NYT side of things, and to that end, we were really fortunate to start this process around the advent of truly usable web font services. While the selection’s still rather meager beyond the workhorse classics and a smattering of more gimmicky display faces (in other words, Lineto, we’re waiting), really I’m just happy to see less Verdana in the world. And luckily for us, the exception-to-the-rule Colophon Foundry has really stepped up their online offerings lately – it’s Aperçu that you’re seeing most around the site, similar in form to my perennial favorite Neuzeit Grotesk but warmer, more geometric, and with a touch of quirk.

Setting type for the web isn’t without it’s issues still, with even one-point size adjustments resulting in sometimes wildly different renderings, but with careful trial-and-error testing and selective application of the life-saving -webkit-font-smoothing CSS property, we managed to get as close as possible to our ideal. It’s the latter in particular that allows us elegant heading treatments (though only visible in effect to Safari and Chrome): set to antialiased, letterforms are less beholden to the pixel grid and more immune to the thickening that sometimes occurs on high-contrast backgrounds.

It’s not something I’d normally note, but we’re breaking away from the norm a bit with our article treatments, using the more traditional indentation format instead of the web’s usual paragraph spacing, finding it to flow better. It’s done using a somewhat complex series of CSS pseudo-elements in combination with adjacent selectors – browser support is finally good enough to accomplish such a thing, thankfully, though it does take a moment to get used to on the screen, strangely enough. And we’re soon going to be launching another section of the site with text rotation, another technique only recently made possible in pure CSS. Coming from a print background, it’s a bit exciting to have these tools available again.

Most of the layout is accomplished with the help of the 960 Grid System. Earlier attempts at something more semantically meaningful proved more hassle than they were worth, considering our plethora of more complex layouts. We’ve really attempted something tighter and more integrated than normally seen on the web, and I think it’s paid off well. That said, doing so really highlighted the difficulties of designing for dynamic systems of content – one such case that reared it’s head early on was titles in tiles (one of the few “units” of content used throughout the site).

A tricky issue at first considering our avoidance of ugly web aesthetics like fades (and artificial depth/dimensionality, and gradients, and drop shadows…), but one eventually solved with the implementation of our date treatments, whose connecting lines also function nicely as a cropping line – a tight, interlocking, cohesive system using one design element to solve the issues of another. We’ve tried to use similar solutions across the site, crafting a system of constraints and affordances, as in the case of our generated article excerpts:

Since we’re losing an element of control with freeform text fields on the web and no specific design oversight as to their individual display, we’ve chosen to implement logic that calculates an article title’s line-length, and then generates only enough lines of the excerpt to match the height of any neighboring articles. It’s a small detail for sure, but we’re hoping these details add up to a fine experience overall.

Anyway, there’s still more to come – you’ll see a few painfully neglected areas here and there (our collections in particular, but also the Sculpture Garden and to a lesser extent these blogs), but they’re next on our list and we’ll document their evolution here.

Process/miscellany

Digital Wayfinding in the Walker, Pt. 1

An ongoing conversation here at the Walker concerns the issue of systemic wayfinding within our spaces — certainly an important issue for an institution actively seeking attendance and public engagement, not to mention an institution whose building is literally a hybrid of the old and new (with our 2005 expansion). While not normally in New […]

An ongoing conversation here at the Walker concerns the issue of systemic wayfinding within our spaces — certainly an important issue for an institution actively seeking attendance and public engagement, not to mention an institution whose building is literally a hybrid of the old and new (with our 2005 expansion). While not normally in New Media’s purview, and only occasionally so for Design, a recent initiative to improve the flow and general satisfaction of visitors brought with it the idea of using digital displays, with their malleable content and powerful visual appeal, to guide and direct people throughout the Walker.

Our new static directional signage

Currently installed in one location of an eventual three, and with a simple “phase one” version of the content, the Bazinet Lobby monitor banks cycle through the title graphics for all the exhibitions currently on view, providing a mental checklist of sorts that allows the visitor to tally what he or she has or hasn’t yet seen that directly references the vinyl graphics at each gallery entrance. The corner conveniently works as an intersection for two hallways leading to a roughly equivalent number of galleries in either direction, one direction leading to our collection galleries in the Barnes tower, and the other our special exhibition galleries in the Herzog & de Meuron expansion. To this end, we’ve repurposed the “street sign” motif used on our new vinyl wall graphics to point either way (which also functions as a nice spacial divider). Each display tower cycles through it’s given exhibitions with a simple sliding transition, exposing the graphics one by one. An interesting side effect of this motion and the high-contrast LCDs has been the illusion of each tower being a ’70s-style mechanical lightbox; I’ve been tempted to supplement it with a soundtrack of quiet creaking.

The system, powered by Sedna Presenter and running on four headless, remotely-accessible Mac Minis directly behind the wall, affords us a lot of flexibility. While our normal exhibitions cycle is a looped After Effects composition, we’re also working on everything from decorative blasts of light and pattern (the screens are blindingly bright enough to bathe almost the entire lobby in color), to live-updating Twitter streams (during parties and special events), to severe weather and fire alerts (complete with a rather terrifying pulsating field of deep red). In fact, this same system is now even powering our pre-show cinema trailers. I’m particularly interested in connecting these to an Arduino’s environmental sensors that would allow us to dynamically change color, brightness, etc. based on everything from temperature to visitor count to time of day — look for more on that soon.

See it in action:

Behind the scenes / Severe weather alert:

 

Installation:

  

New Media Initiatives’ Somewhat Unintentional Tribute to Mr. Jobs (R.I.P.)

Our little corner of the office, over the past few months, has been transformed into a veritable Apple Store in miniature. You’ll be seeing some of these around the galleries soon. Photo by Greg Beckel


Our little corner of the office, over the past few months, has been transformed into a veritable Apple Store in miniature. You’ll be seeing some of these around the galleries soon.

Photo by Greg Beckel