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Touchscreen roundup

Chris O’Shea of Pixelsumo sent me a note letting me know he has been collecting info on mutli-touch screens as well and has a wealth of links to check out. The most impressive of which is the Perceptive Pixel screen. Check out the video to see it in action. We’ve previously covered O’Shea’s Sonicforms project. […]

Chris O’Shea of Pixelsumo sent me a note letting me know he has been collecting info on mutli-touch screens as well and has a wealth of links to check out. The most impressive of which is the Perceptive Pixel screen. Check out the video to see it in action. We’ve previously covered O’Shea’s Sonicforms project.

I also recalled hearing about some big multitouch screens at CES this year, but google is not helping me. I did find a mention of a large screen from Sharp that was shown at IFA 2006. Watch this clip at about 1:37 for a short view. I can’t find any more details on it, so if someone knows more, I’d love to hear it.

Accenture also has produced some large-scale mutli-touch screen recently. Here’s the press release. The scale is certainly impressive (10×7):

And some tech details:

Accenture’s patent-pending touch sensing system has the ability to distinguish between touches from multiple simultaneous users. Additionally high-resolution cameras are leveraged to provide touch capabilities for simultaneous usage. The screen consists of a series of nine rear-projection DLP screens fastened together to display cohesive images at a clarity of 2100 x 1200 pixels/resolution. The network is managed and updated from a remote location to allow for content to be adjusted regularly.

Here’s a video of what I think is the same tech being used in a military application, though it doesn’t show off the multi-touch capabilities, and some information on Accenture’s site.

  • I used one of these in some airport. Chicago I think. It was rather fun to use and two people really can fool around on it at the same time. I saw a good deal of people just standing back and watching as well.

    As with any touch screen there are problems with use when you consider low vision or poor dexterity visitors. But touch screens are just so darn intuitive they are hard to not consider in many cases.

  • John Feick says:

    since a piano-type keyboard is essentially two dimensional, isn’t it possible to emulate multitouch as points on a line using a conventional touch screen. Finger position on the key could code volume. I need this for my music system for brain injury survivors and disabled persons. http://www.tbirefocus.com

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