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mnartists’ Most Popular Articles of 2013: Surly Brewing, Lady Choirs, Summer Camp, CVA’s Closing and Cindy Sherman

Below, you’ll find mnartists.org’s 20 most-read articles of 2013 — just a sampling of more than 125 original, longform essays, interviews, profiles and reviews we published in the homepage arts magazine last year. Compiling this list, I’m struck by the rapid growth of readership for the site’s journalism in recent months. Our most-read pieces routinely […]

Below, you’ll find mnartists.org’s 20 most-read articles of 2013 — just a sampling of more than 125 original, longform essays, interviews, profiles and reviews we published in the homepage arts magazine last year. Compiling this list, I’m struck by the rapid growth of readership for the site’s journalism in recent months. Our most-read pieces routinely garner thousands of page-views these days — and those are numbers that, for us, were exceptional just a few years ago. That’s thanks to our stable of talented arts journalists and critics, of course, not to mention Minnesota’s wealth notable creative work for them to write on. But it’s also thanks to you, mnartists’ engaged community of artists and arts audiences who take the time, not only to read local arts journalism, but to contribute to the conversations therein, commenting on and sharing those articles with friends via platforms like Facebook and Twitter thereby extending their reach well beyond our state’s borders. And that doesn’t just broaden the audience for mnartists’ published writing, it also raises the visibility of the art and artists whose work is covered.  So, thanks for reading — and stay tuned, would you? There’s so much more good stuff to come in 2014.

surly hgs

Surly Brewery design rendering: Garden view to the brew hall. Rendering courtesy of HGA Architects and Engineers

Surly puts architecture to work building its brand: Camille LeFevre’s report on HGA Architects’ design plans (and resulting critical blowback) for Surly Brewing’s new destination brewery in Minneapolis was our most-read essay of 2013. In her piece, she makes the case that the plan’s detractors got it all wrong: the bunker-like, Brutalist design is the perfect fulfillment of Surly’s image and brand.

cabin time

Photo: Carson Davis Brown

A history of Cabin Time: Kevin Buist profiled the tight-knit group of Midwestern artists behind the now-internationally-known project, Cabin Time. It began with some Michigan creatives, snowed in together on a vacation getaway Up North.  They made the best of their situation – building campfires, taking hikes, sharing meals and making art with the materials at hand. They also documented everything — and a scrappy, nomadic, thoroughly 21st-century artist residency was born.

CVA

College of Visual Arts in St. Paul announced it would close in June 2013. Photo courtesy of CVA

Behind the scenes of the closing of the College of Visual Arts:  Camille LeFevre dug behind the official talking points about the school’s closing, speaking to CVA’s interim president, faculty and alumni about the college’s money troubles, sinking enrollment, and community concerns about management, plus grassroots efforts to save CVA.

Samantha French

Samantha French, Emerge (clear waters), 48″ x 60″, oil on canvas, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Samantha French, escape artist: Jay Orff considers MN-to-NYC artist Samantha French’s bright, Impressionistic paintings of a summer idyll. He asks: When so much contemporary art seeks to shock and surprise, to push boundaries, is such an unabashedly pleasant, familiar style of work still relevant to the conversation?

summer camp.

Camper Jeff Barnett-Winsby. Photo: Julian Bleecker, courtesy of Walker Art Center.

The secret grace of summer camp: Thanks to Alec Soth and the Little Brown Mushroom team, a group of international artists and writers find themselves at “summer camp for socially awkward storytellers,” immersed in finding the stories hiding in plain sight within the marvelous mundanities of the Midwest – and Ira Brooker covered the story for mnartists.

cindy sherman

Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #56, 1980. Gelatin silver print, 6 3/8 x 9 7/16″ (16.2 x 24 cm). The Museum of Modern Art © 2011 Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman and the art of making faces: Lightsey Darst reviewed January’s Cindy Sherman show at the Walker and calls it one of the most important bodies of feminist art today — but not for any of the reasons cited on the wall in didactics accompanying the artist’s retrospective.

Prairie Fire Lady Choir. Photo: Erin Smith

Prairie Fire Lady Choir. Photo: Erin Smith

The rise of women’s choirs: Deborah Carver profiled the burgeoning Twin Cities women’s choral scene: Prairie Fire Lady Choir, Twin Cities Women’s Choir and Nona Marie’s Anonymous Choir.

nice fish

Nice Fish and an interview in two acts: Connie Wanek spoke with poet Louis Jenkins and Tony Award-winner Mark Rylance last fall, about their collaboration on the play, Nice Fish, and its evolutions from page to stage, as they began preparations for the Guthrie’s world premiere of the production last spring. (And here’s part two of her profile, on the process of casting for the show.)

Sarah Black’s and Jillian Soto, Three Times Around the Long Way (installation view). Photo: Seth Dahlseid

Sarah Black’s and Jillian Soto, Three Times Around the Long Way (installation view). Photo: Seth Dahlseid

Art that dared you to participate: Nathan Young reviewed the sculpture exhibition, Resonating Bodies, at the Soap Factory this July. Specifically, his essay raises the question: If there are no labels on the wall, no readily available didactics, how does a viewer navigate oblique, conceptual art to figure out what they’re seeing? Are such roadmaps to engaging art obsolete?

Ballet of the Dolls perform The Red Shoes in a raw Ritz Theater

Ballet of the Dolls perform The Red Shoes in a raw Ritz Theater

The disappearance of dance curators: Both Cowles and the Southern have now forsaken curated performance seasons for rentals and bottom line-friendly shows. Walker’s dance-focused curator was recently laid off. In this essay, dance critic Lightsey Darst asks, “Are dance curators a luxury we can’t afford? Does it matter?”

More of our most-read articles and essays from 2013, including a few surprises from the archive:

“The Art Stands Alone”: Sheila Regan reviews the third Minnesota biennial at the Soap Factory — , , , curated by Art of This cofounders David Petersen and John Marks

Confessions of a Craft Show Organizer“: Crafty Planet proprietor and No Coast Craft-O-Rama cofounder, Trish Hoskins’ 2008 piece offering tips for selling your work on the craft show circuit

Lumber and Lutheran Grit“: Andy Sturdevant’s mnartists 2008 profile of artist Chris Larson saw a dramatic surge in readers upon the release of his new essay collection published this fall by Coffee House Press, Potluck Supper with Meeting to Follow

The Play and Power of Women in Hip Hop“: Lightsey Darst’s 2009 essay on Intermedia Arts’ annual month-long celebration of women in hip-hop, B-Girl Be

To Dream of a New Kind of Making“: Ann Klefstad’s review of Duluth Art Institute’s Confluence/Confluencia show, a collaborative exhibition last March by Cecilia Ramon and Carla Stetson

Why Venus DeMars’ Art Matters More Than Her Audit“: Ira Brooker’s essay on what happens when an artist becomes a cause célèbre

A Conversation on Painting“: Painters Joe Smith and Ruben Nusz sat down for a far-ranging conversation about self-help and primal gestures, blankets and childhood, and how to capture the unfixed, unnamed moment before language

Artists Should Be Disappointing Sometimes“: Lightsey Darst on the Low controversy at last summer’s Rock the Garden, risk-taking dance, and the inestimable value of leaving room for artistic blunders

Why Does Minnesota Still Go Crazy for Prince?”: Ira Brooker’s dispatch from this fall’s 2 a.m. concert at Paisley Park

Painting a Place Between Invention and Memory“: Ann Klefstad on Duluth-based artist Scott Murphy

What to Take to the Bridge?

ArtPrize and mnartists.org have partnered up to give a Minnesota artist a unique opportunity: $5,000 and their artwork installed on/around/under the Gillett Bridge in Grand Rapids, Michigan during the city-wide art competition. This initiative, a “regional grant program,” as described by ArtPrize’s Director of Exhibitions Kevin Buist, will reach its denouement this Thursday for ArtPrize […]

ArtPrize and mnartists.org have partnered up to give a Minnesota artist a unique opportunity: $5,000 and their artwork installed on/around/under the Gillett Bridge in Grand Rapids, Michigan during the city-wide art competition. This initiative, a “regional grant program,” as described by ArtPrize’s Director of Exhibitions Kevin Buist, will reach its denouement this Thursday for ArtPrize Pitch Night: Take it to the Bridge as five Minnesota finalists defend their art proposals to a jury and a live audience. Each artist will keep it short and sweet—with just five minutes to give a presentation—and the recipient of the $5,000 prize and coveted art location will be announced at the end of the evening. Review the five finalists’ ideas below, and bring your best questions for them to the Walker Art Center this Thursday. For, as Buist puts it, “[we] believe that debate is good.”

Broc Blegen_Slide_3

Broc Blegen

Recent MAEP artist Broc Blegen has proposed A Monument to Community. Rather than erecting a traditional sculpture, Blegen describes his project as a “sculptural project using sandbags as the primary medium;” the idea is to delineate spaces of reflection and alter the movement of pedestrians by employing the tool of utility and disaster relief.

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Perci Chester

Sculptor Perci Chester has designed a laser-cut sculpture that embodies the freedom of a joyride: Squealies for Wheelies. The colorful, abstract work in polychrome and stainless steel portrays a woman at the wheel, and Chester has used medium to reflect content by covering her work with automative paint.

 Yousif

Yousif Del Valle

Yousif Del Valle is interested in changing the flow of traffic on the Gillett Bridge. The artist and musician has designed a winding path made of wooden crates that will slow foot traffic and provide viewers with a guessing game: what is inside of those boxes?

newsom

Jennifer Newsom Carruthers and Thomas Benjamin Carruthers 

The architect and design team Dream the Combine, Jennifer Newsom Carruthers and Tom Carruthers, have dreamed up a reflective installation along the bridge. The duo plan on streaming a live-video projection of the water underneath the Gillett Bridge and then projecting the footage through five vertical, mirrored theaters and into the sky.

 feinberg

Daniel Feinberg and Alexander Hanson

Daniel Feinberg and Alexander Hanson have envisioned a playful and dramatic site-specific installation that will allow viewers to think about different ways of crossing a bridge. The artists set the scene and let the viewers fill in the rest: “a broken down early-90s Chevrolet Suburban SUV, blocking passage of a frequented footbridge spanning the Grand River,” covered with stairs, will greet each pedestrian.

ArtPrize Pitch Night will take place in the Walker Cinema at 7 pm on Thursday, May 31st. Tickets are free and will be released at 6 pm. Presented by the Walker Art Center and mnartists.org, in partnership with ArtPrize.

Posture Is Everything: An Interview with Artist Kristina Estell

Duluth-based artist Kristina Estell’s recent exhibition Posture Is Everything currently occupies the north gallery of the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program (MAEP) at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA). Composed of cool, pale blue sheets of silicone elegantly draped atop triangular wooden armature, Posture Is Everything calls to mind winding river beds, fallen skies and couch-fort mountain ranges. […]

estell_9

Posture Is Everything, 2013. Image courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Duluth-based artist Kristina Estell’s recent exhibition Posture Is Everything currently occupies the north gallery of the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program (MAEP) at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA). Composed of cool, pale blue sheets of silicone elegantly draped atop triangular wooden armature, Posture Is Everything calls to mind winding river beds, fallen skies and couch-fort mountain ranges. Like many of Estell’s sculptural forms and installations, this ethereal work evokes the gestures and forms of nature, rather then offering a direct representation of the natural world. I chatted with the artist recently by email to learn about the complex process involved in making the work in her exhibition, nature as medium, classical drapery and institutional posturing.

Jehra Patrick

I heard that the “drapery” in your piece was produced by the very labor-intensive process of painting silicone onto the walls of the MAEP space. Can you walk me through that process?

Kristina Estell

Actually, the piece in the MAEP gallery was produced in my studio! Due to material off-gassing and other concerns, the museum didn’t approve the original proposal to use the silicone on the walls of the space to create the work. A connection to the MAEP space is made apparent through the actual size of the combined dimensions of the sheets of rubber in the exhibition. These dimensions equal that of the MAEP space – 1352 sq. feet.

For Posture is Everything, the process was labor-intensive, but necessary to achieve the desired thickness – as well as to economically use the material — and to make it strong enough to support itself on such a large scale. Once I had determined the size of the pieces of rubber I needed, I mapped those dimensions out on the wall’s surface and then applied a thin layer of the silicone directly onto the wall using a three-inch chip brush. The liquid rubber is quite thick and has to be applied fairly evenly to achieve the effect that I want.

Installation in progress for Posture is Everything. Image courtesy of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Installation in progress for Posture is Everything. Image courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Once the first coat is applied, the material cures for 24 hours, all the while creeping down the wall’s surface as it sets. I then laid down a layer of thin nylon mesh fabric on the silicone’s surface and applied another full coat of rubber, adhering and sandwiching the material onto the first coat of rubber. Once the second layer was set, I simply peeled the rubber off the wall, rolling it onto a large cardboard tube to keep it clean and flat. The color of the silicone rubber comes “naturally” from the chemical activator provided by the manufacturer, and it’s one of the reasons why I like using this particular kind of silicone. Another great characteristic of this silicone mold material is that it doesn’t permanently adhere to (almost) any surface except itself, which makes it very user-friendly and flexible in terms of potential applications.

treatment (covered), 2011. Image courtesy of the artist.

Jehra Patrick

A process similar to that was used to produce a previous work, treatment (covered), completed for the Kabinett Gallery during your residency at the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Germany – how was that process different?

Kristina Estell

For the treatment installation, the goal was initially much more about creating a subtle and materially-charged space – treating the space, as it were. After many calculations, much prep-work, and a call for volunteer helpers, I set up a station in the middle of the gallery and just starting mixing silicone. This particular silicone was dyed with a bit of blue and gray color. Using the same small chip brush technique, my helpers and I brushed two layers of silicone onto the ceiling, walls, fixtures, windows and radiators, in this case, without the layer of fabric in between. I then let the material cure and migrate down the walls as it set.

Jehra Patrick

I’m interested in the relationship between the two pieces and your decision to repeat the action and make use of the material in a new way for the MAEP show. Can you speak to the evolution of your concept and process from one exhibition to the next?

Kristina Estell

treatment directly inspired the work at the MIA. At the end of the exhibition at the Akademie, I returned to de-install the work. Through this process, I realized a whole new experience of the material. My expectations for covering a room in silicone included, initially, the experience of the material as a direct part of the space as an installation, and secondly, being able to remove this material to retain the mold of the space as a rubber negative. In practice, the additional and unexpected part of the process became even more interesting to me as I started to remove the material from the space and learn about the spaces characteristics in such thin dimensions and at such a large scale. As the material started to come off, it began to peel itself from the wall — pulled down by its own weight — and that created really beautiful, and kind of theatrical, draping forms hanging from the surface of the walls. I found these forms so interesting, I knew I wanted to create another work that intentionally used this discovery in a more deliberate way and which might really exploit the weighty, draping potential of the rubber.

Installation in progress for Posture is Everything. Image courtesy of The Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Installation in progress for Posture is Everything. Image courtesy of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Jehra Patrick

Silicone, or rubber, seems like a particularly unnatural and permanent [non biodegradable] material. What is the importance of the material in this work? Is it the behavior of the material or the implications of its use that you’re primarily interested in?

Kristina Estell

The silicone material I am using is, of course, industrially manipulated to have the uses and properties it does, but it is not so very far removed from [unprocessed] silicon, the chemical element found in nature, and that makes up an enormous percentage of the earth’s crust, for example. And in this rubberized form, the silicone mold material is actually not permanent. In fact, the life of all these sheets of rubber is very uncertain. The “skin” will start to degrade and the color will change over time…probably pretty dramatically within the space of just five years.

Jehra Patrick

That is interesting! I had it in my head that silicone (probably in terms of medical implants, etc.) was this permanent, fake thing. Thanks for returning me to the Periodic Table! That really gives the piece an added dimension, to think about it behaving like a skin – in form and behavior – molting off the walls, really delicate and fragile, even taking on attributes of aging.

Kristina Estell

To answer your question: Drawing lines back and forth between the material and the referring implications of its use is exactly what interests me so much in this material as a central subject and object in my work.

Processing and Computation, 2013. Image courtesy of the artist

Jehra Patrick 

Working directly with the site, as in the walls of the exhibition space, or collecting materials – such as rocks – from the area where you work appears to be a thread in your practice. Does your general studio practice guide you to work in response to your site of production? Or, does this [site-specificity] differ from your general studio practice, having more to do with preparing for a particular exhibition?

Kristina Estell

Depending on the project, where I am working at the time, etc, my working practice is very flexible. I do find inspiration in being outside of my everyday environment, and often I create work for specific locations. Many projects only exist in certain locations, but others can translate to other sites as well.  I see my studio practice as a kind of magnification process — taking a small thing from outside and blowing it up into something else within my work space.

My working practice is materially inspired but conceptually relies on finding and creating simple connections and gestures. Depending on the idea, my working practice, materials, processes change for almost every new project. Recently, I have been studying glass working and am preparing a station in the studio to start exploring this medium. I work with a material for some amount of time until I am able to understand it, how it acts and what connections I can develop between its physical properties and a set of ideas that interest me. This naturally involves a lot of trial and error, but this is also the best way to actually learn and make discoveries that can inform finishing a project and inspiring a new one.

Jehra Patrick 

The natural world has long been central to your work, yet you often approach the subject in subtle, indirect ways. Is this reflective of your own experience of nature? Or, are you simply looking for less representational ways to discuss natural forms?

Kristina Estell

That’s an interesting question. I feel like I use nature within my work as more of a medium than a subject sometimes: a set of imagery and objects to think through, learn from, processes and events that are relative to my own experience but which are also just the common experience of living today. Nature is something that holds us all; it’s a reflexive subject and it makes sense to pay attention to it that way. It’s also just the language that seems most essential to me.

Installation view of Posture is Everything, 2013. Image courtesy of The Minneapolis Institute of Art

Installation view of Posture is Everything, 2013. Image courtesy of The Minneapolis Institute of Art

Jehra Patrick

That is beautiful and poetic — the notion of nature as medium. This resonates with so many disciplines: painting by way of oil, photography’s use of light and chemicals, sculpture’s origination in stone.  I also appreciate your intentionality in blurring subject-object-medium and the slippage between form and materials. These poetics seem to work their way into the title of your current exhibition. Would you talk a little about that title: Posture is Everything?

Kristina Estell

I liked the ambiguity and the structure implied by the title, Posture is Everything. It is obviously resolute, but I was hoping that – in combination with seeing the work in the gallery – this resolution would be dissolved a bit and the title would help create a sense of urging effort within the sculptural forms; a sense that this dense, heavy, sagging but beautiful material — with all its references — has intentions of real structure or ‘posture’ but no such actual potential without the wooden armature underneath it. The ‘everything’ in the title makes it just priceless, bringing up an elusive sense of value and what matters. I especially thought this title would be interesting within the institution context of the art museum.

Jehra Patrick

Let’s talk more about the work’s placement within the art museum. In form, the silicone brings to mind historical imagery within a museum such as classical painting, or assemblies of objects and fabric swaths from life drawing. The armature nearly references easels. In titling, ‘everything’ might refer to all the museums holdings, or all things of greatness – art as valuables, or the art or the artist’s role, or stature, but also implies that these roles or behaviors are misleading. Do artists, or the museum posture as well?

Kristina Estell 

Yes, all these points you bring up are connections I am interested in. Right away during the install process, I was getting comments from various people about the visual similarities the piece has to other artwork within the museum and beyond. I didn’t expect such a direct relationship to specific works held by the museum, but did anticipate the relationship to the tradition of drawing, painting, still lifes and enjoyed pulling from that [classical] ‘standard’ of beauty that suggests objectivity, as well as genericness of subject.

The practice of working from drapery or fabric shapes with such attention and detail to accomplish form without content is very interesting to me; it is the most simple and empty way to illustrate ‘posture,’ or the act of posturing, which I definitely believe art does. The genre of still life most honestly reveals its postured nature. Necessarily, I do think artists and art institutions build on a series of postures that feel flexible and tenuous…at times misleading as well, but possibly just more undefined in our culture.

Kristina Estell’s work references physical material systems through an exploration of the theme of landscape and vision. As sculpture, my work exists in pieces, parts of a whole. It is ephemeral in its design as well as in the quality expressed by the use of such materials as transparent resin, sheer fabric, lenses and clear silicone. Using a range of sculptural and drawing techniques, my work aims to expand our understanding of landscape to include sites outside of our immediate periphery, which might be deeply interior or vastly exterior. These processes often result in a collection of naturally suggestive but ambiguous forms that come together to narrate a space and question our perceptions of nature.

Kristina Estell’s Posture is Everything runs until Sunday, June 20, 2013 at in the Minnesota Artists Exhibition Program gallery at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts

Artist’s Talks: Thursday, May 16, 2013, 7-9 p.m.
Special Guests: Thursday, June 20, 2013, 7-9 p.m.

Look for Kristina’s work in the Minnesota Biennial at The Soap Factory, where she will create drawings from materials collected from the gallery, itself.

For more on the artist, visit her website at kristinaestell.com and blog kristinaestell.blogspot.com

mnartists.org’s Most Popular Articles of 2012: Bar art, RACA, Sports and Ballet

At mnartists.org, we published more than 125 articles last year – original essays, reviews, profiles and interviews – about and by local artists, covering the issues, personalities and trends relevant here and elsewhere in theater, visual arts, music, dance, architecture, fashion and more. Below, you’ll find a rundown of the original arts writing with the […]

At mnartists.org, we published more than 125 articles last year – original essays, reviews, profiles and interviews – about and by local artists, covering the issues, personalities and trends relevant here and elsewhere in theater, visual arts, music, dance, architecture, fashion and more.

Below, you’ll find a rundown of the original arts writing with the most readers in 2012.

The much wondered-over John Bowman painting, "Crossings", in situ at the 331 in MplsPhoto by Kurt Froehlich, courtesy of the author

The much wondered-over John Bowman painting, “Crossings”, in situ at the 331 in Mpls. Photo by Kurt Froehlich, courtesy of the author

The most beloved art in the Twin Cities?: Andy Sturdevant unearthed a love story of sorts – about a Minneapolis bar, its many regulars, and a certain moody landscape painting with mystery and loads of apocryphal tales, which he argues may just be the most beloved artwork in the city.

Gregory Euclide (Le Sueur, MN), "caution gathered paths around your bending"Image courtesy of the artist, RACA, and the Arts Center of St. Peter

Gregory Euclide (Le Sueur, MN), “caution gathered paths around your bending”. Image courtesy of the artist, RACA, and the Arts Center of St. Peter

Rural art gets its due Twin Cities-to-Mankato transplant Stephanie Wilbur Ash got ahead of the buzz on Rural America Contemporary Art (aka RACA) with this late 2011 profile on the artists behind the inception of the group aiming to “make nowhere into somewhere”.

Michael Borremans, "The Devil's Dress," oil on panel, 2011.Courtesy of David Zwirner.

Michael Borremans, “The Devil’s Dress,” oil on panel, 2011. Courtesy of David Zwirner.

A painter on painting: Artist Ruben Nusz gave a close reading of the haunting paintings by Belgian painter Michaël Borremans, on view in early 2012 at David Zwirner in New York.

Annie Leibovitz, "Kirby Puckett," 1988Photo courtesy of the MIA

Annie Leibovitz, “Kirby Puckett,” 1988. Photo courtesy of the MIA

Inverting the male gaze: Last spring, Sheila Regan looked at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ multimedia exhibition, The Sports Show, as a lens through which to assess our changing norms and mores about race and gender.

"Back Lash", silver gelatin print, photograph by Polly NormanSee more on the artist's website: www.pollynormanart.com

“Back Lash”, silver gelatin print, photograph by Polly Norman

Inside the dance: Poet and dancer Lightsey Darst gave a candid personal essay on her years in ballet class — the devotion and the ordeal of daily practice, and the human moments of pain, pettiness, and triumph.

Other well-read articles on mnartists.org this year, including a few deep catalog surprises:

 “Seeing Target Field,” on the art and architecture of Target Field, by Michael Fallon

 “First Crayons,” musings on the pleasures and perils of trying to raise a creative kid, by food and wine writer Dara Moskowitz Grumdahl

 “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place,” a look at co-working spaces in the Twin Cities by Alison Morse

 “Dolly Parton Dreams, Reconsidered,”  or, “My Dream of Moving to the Country to Write a Book and the Pygmy Goats and Insouciance I Didn’t Get”, a personal essay by  Sari Gordon

 “Becoming an Artist All Over Again,” Ann Klefstad’s profile of Duluth-based artist Marian Lansky, a graphic designer who reinvented herself mid-career to create Shy Nimitta.

“McQueen’s Delicious Delirium,” Camille LeFevre’s 2011 dispatch from New York, on the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition of the fashion, performance art, and fetish objects of Alexander McQueen

Ten Artists to Watch in 2013

This past year celebrated introductions to new spaces, innovative public programs, and remarkable solo and group moments for up-and-coming Minnesotan artists. With so many artists on the rise, I’d rather look forward to the year ahead by calling out emerging talents who show promise, authenticity, and sophistication. Keep your eyes peeled –these artists are up […]

This past year celebrated introductions to new spaces, innovative public programs, and remarkable solo and group moments for up-and-coming Minnesotan artists. With so many artists on the rise, I’d rather look forward to the year ahead by calling out emerging talents who show promise, authenticity, and sophistication. Keep your eyes peeled –these artists are up to nothing but good.

Installation view of HOTTEA’s recent exhibition at HAUS Salon. Photo: Eli Eijadi

Eric Rieger

You may know Eric Rieger via his cozy, semiotic moniker, HOTTEA, whose typographic, temporary graffiti first appeared in rogue, public locations throughout the streets of Minneapolis and internationally. Rieger’s practice has since been endorsed by contemporary art venues, including the Minneapolis Institute of Art, where he created glowing color-field canopies from thousands of dangling strings of yarn. Rieger’s ability to pivot between form, discipline and artistic communities is a recipe for success in a broader contemporary practice. Rumor has it he has a painting show on the horizon and exhibitions soon to open in New York. My attention is fixed.

She Walked Into the Room Dripping Gold, Luke Grothe, 2011

Luke Grothe

For Luke Grothe, glamour is an aesthetic. In his “endless dance-party,” glitz, gold, fashion, lamé, and late nights are the subjects of his installations and images. In a heady, minimal, high-concept art landscape, Grothe’s practice is like Andrew WK kicking a Solo Cup around the set of Lady Gaga’s “Just Dance” video; let’s keep this energy at a crescendo and hope there are more good times to come!

JAN-DEC, Lauren Thorson, 2012

Lauren Thorson

A recent MFA graduate from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design–and clearly an excellent designer–Lauren Thorson’s practice covers the gamut, from data visualization and web design to GIFs, motion graphics, and interactive work, often taking meteorological findings as her subject with beautiful, graphic outputs and attention to palette and presentation. This includes interactive events, such as her project Synthetic Unity for Northern Spark in 2011. Thorson is also part of the Interactive Visualization Lab team at the University of Minnesota, where she specializes in illustrating rendering algorithms for describing complex motion data.

Alan Gerlach

An up-and-coming student of Chris Larson, Gerlach moves with ease through interdisciplinary arenas including printmaking, sculpture, video and photography. His fall 2012 BFA exhibition tackled the rich history and mise en scéne of a dilapidated flour mill through urban exploration coupled with archival historical studies and showed an impressive comprehension of materials and subject far beyond an undergraduate level.

Desperate Drawing #6, Katelyn Farstad, 2012

Katelyn Farstad

In what could be described, locally, as the best volunteer show ever, Katelyn Farstad received a solo exhibition at Midway Contemporary Art only two years after receiving her BFA. Her gritty sculptural painting conglomerates, haughty titling, and perverted artist statements stand out among her modest Minnesotan contemporaries. Discussion-worthy and easy to dismiss as youthful, Katelyn proved prolific enough to keep up with the hype. She recently caught the attention of major New York gallery Zach Feuer, where her Lee Press-on Nails, flypaper, spackled lattice, and crusty wicker frosted in acrylics merge seamlessly with Feuer’s roster of dirty Q-tip and soy sauce packet formalism. Next up for the artist is an exhibition at Chicago’s Julius Caesar Gallery. Am I curious as to what is in store for Farstad? Absolutely!

To the Victor Go the Spoils, Lea Sorrentino, 2012

Lea Sorrentino

Self-described as “short, loud and angry,” Lea Sorrentino is a vaguely sassy, whip-smart artist, recently graduating with a MFA from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Working in sculpture, installation and video, in addition to being a thoughtful writer, Sorrentino produces work calling attention to the constructs of American success and the emotional investments we place in possessions and entertainment. Also, anyone with John Rambo and Steve Buscemi tattoos is alright in my book.

Sighting near Scipio, Utah, Nate Burbeck, 2011

Nate Burbeck

Catching a wave of popular circulation for his tumblr blog Fly Over Art and sister blogs, Beyond 9th Avenue and In The New FrontierNate Burbeck has initiated regional conversations with a broad and national audience, introducing new work from emerging artists in a non-hierarchical feed among contemporary stars like Nathan Hylden and museum favorites like Edward Hopper. New platforms for art sharing are trending–could Burbeck’s blogs go the way of Contemporary Art Daily? Either way, we artists thank you, Nate Burbeck, for expanding our circle and increasing our SEO! He’s an accomplished painter to boot, working in eerie social realism/contemporary regionalism.

MONOLITHS, Jesse Draxler, 2012

Jesse Draxler

Jesse Draxler’s collages are smart; the artist demonstrates a clear level of competence and purpose with editing and compositions. Working from pop-cultural and vintage imagery, his craft–call it X-acto expertise?–puts him at the forefront of other artists working with similar materials. His work borders on design–as in, it would make an awesome t-shirt–but the pieces also have strong footing as gallery-hanging art objects. What’s most notable is Draxler’s confidence with production and distribution. Aware of his audience and the context for work, the artist leverages the internet as a venue (and art form!) and reaches a broad audience which interacts with his work by reposting, commenting, and tagging.

The Pittz, video still, Katy Vonk, 2011

Katy Vonk

Katy Vonk works with a diverse array of media, including digital videos, photography, environments, drawing, sculpture. Her work feels fresh and diverse, creating digital atmospheres and static planes that feel painterly, abstract, spastic, frantic, and flippant, but then at other times soothing, gorgeous and vapid. Layered guttural sounds wash over manipulated synthetic animations in moody vignettes. All together they’re awesomely disturbing, visually compelling, and at times annoying.

The artist you haven’t heard of.

Don’t underestimate young blood. Emerging artists are growing up, graduating with gusto, relocating here from other states, creating their own venues and making better work, everyday. In 2013, I encourage artists and the arts-minded to make new acquaintances, and follow, support and collect work from that new and exciting talent.

The Year in MN Art: mnartists.org Staffers Weigh in on the Highlights of 2012

At this, the annual juncture of new and old, our small-but-mighty crew at mnartists.org is taking stock of the year just passed and peering ahead with our wishes for 2013.  All this week, look for idiosyncratic, entirely subjective and by-no-means-exhaustive lists from each of us, with our favorite moments from 2012 – things we saw […]

At this, the annual juncture of new and old, our small-but-mighty crew at mnartists.org is taking stock of the year just passed and peering ahead with our wishes for 2013.  All this week, look for idiosyncratic, entirely subjective and by-no-means-exhaustive lists from each of us, with our favorite moments from 2012 – things we saw and loved, and that gave us heart for what’s in store for the year to come.

Without further ado, here’s what most delighted me in 2012:

John Hodgman, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett at the Varsity: Late last March, in honor of the publication of That Is All, the final installment in Hodgman’s fabulously absurd Complete World Knowledge trilogy, the “deranged millionaire” and humorist, joined by MST3K veterans Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett, regaled an enthusiastically nerdy crowd at Minneapolis’ Varsity Theater with off-the-cuff stories and made-up facts, covering everything from George R. R. Martin, hobos and Ragnarok to behind-the-scenes dish from Hodgman’s small-screen career as a “Famous Minor Television Personality.”

Little Brown Mushroom’s House of Coates: Writer Brad Zellar and photographer Alec Soth teamed up for a series of well-received road-trip story-and-picture dispatches last year, but my favorite of these is the first, House of Coates, a beautiful limited-edition book published by Little Brown Mushroom, inspired by the “edges of everything” exploits of one Lester B. Morrison: rangy philosopher, drifter, and quintessential loner.

Photograph from "House of Coates" published in a limited edition series by Little Brown Mushroom in 2012.

Photograph from “House of Coates” published in a limited edition series by Little Brown Mushroom in 2012.

Artists took the reins of opportunity, making this a remarkable year for independent art start-ups. Some standouts: Nate Young and Caroline Kent’s studio-turned-gallery space, The Bindery Projects; Art-Of-This founder David Petersen’s new commercial gallery space in Minneapolis; and Rural America Contemporary Art (RACA, for short), brainchild of Mankato-based painter Brian Frink, which grew from a popular Facebook group to a web hub and biannual online magazine for serious-minded artists off the usually urban art grid.

The City of Saint Paul expanded its team of City Artists in Residence to three: the city’s original such artist, Marcus Young, was recently joined by Amanda Lovelee and Sarah West. The team of artists-in-residence is embedded “upstream”, immersed in the development and execution of a variety of city projects, working side by side with administrators, urban planners and public works staff to integrate the arts into everyday civic life and planning.

Everyday Poems for City Sidewalk, conceived by City Artist in Residence. Photo courtesy of Public Art St. Paul.

Everyday Poems for City Sidewalk, conceived by City Artist in Residence. Photo courtesy of Public Art St. Paul.

The flourishing of Lowertown: St. Paul stalwarts like Zeitgeist’s Studio Z, the Artists’ Quarter, Black Dog Coffee and Wine Bar have long brought a variety of new music and jazz to the area; Big Table Studio and Amsterdam Bar and Hall pair nicely to anchor the neighborhood’s burgeoning design and indie music scenes; Minnesota Museum of American Art announced a new brick-and-mortar Project Space in the old Pioneer Press building; Bedlam Theatre just opened a St. Paul outpost, promising a welcome counterpoint to the area’s large-venue performance offerings. With light rail soon to come, there’s so much promise on the horizon for the arts and artists in this up-and-coming St. Paul neighborhood.

MMAA Exec. Dir. Kristen Makholm in front of the museum's new Project Space. Photo by Paul Shambroom.

MMAA Exec. Dir. Kristen Makholm in front of the museum’s new Project Space. Photo by Paul Shambroom.

Blank Slate Theatre’s Spring Awakening: In what was a very good year for theater, small companies in particular, Twin Cities audiences had a number of opportunities to see this Tony Award-winning musical – Theatre Latte Da’s staging, in particular, was polished and deeply entertaining and is deservedly appearing on a number of “best of the year” lists around town. But, for me, a quieter iteration gets the nod: I was just gobsmacked by Blank Slate Theatre’s gutsy all-youth production, held in the basement of St. Paul’s First Baptist Church: emotionally fearless, intimate and beautifully executed by the cast, the show was pitch perfect in its fidelity to the shaggy ardors of real-life adolescence.

Labor-of-love lit mags made a splash: We’ve been hearing about the decline of print for years now, but that hasn’t stopped intrepid newcomers, like the folks behind Thirty Two, Revolver and Paper Darts, from continuing to dive into publishing headfirst, taking a shot at shaking up the old business model with some new flair. All have a smart online presence and lean overhead, consistently trenchant and engaging editorial content and painstaking attention to artful design, fueled issue after issue by sheer audacity, grit and hustle.

Thirty-Two_Issue-2stroke-248x330oblivions

Dioramas: Air Sweet Air’s Just Like Honey show, an irresistible and varied exhibition of artist-made dioramas, was such a surprise: the creations on view had all the nostalgic allure of childhood games of make-believe, but animated by undercurrents of subtle, grown-up insight and witty commentary about the contemporary flux of human-made sprawl and manufactured landscapes in context of the natural environments in and around them.

Alyssa Baguss, “Home on the Range,” UTO (Unidentified Technological Device), mixed media, 2012. Photo by Cheryl Wilgren Clyne, courtesy of Air Sweet Air

Alyssa Baguss, “Home on the Range,” UTO (Unidentified Technological Device), mixed media, 2012. Photo by Cheryl Wilgren Clyne, courtesy of Air Sweet Air

Spoken word and slam poetry went viral. There were some terrific poetry collections released this year – Heid Erdrich’s Cell Traffic; Odessa by Patricia Kirkpatrick; Sun Yung Shin’s Rough, and Savage; and Pitch by Todd Boss immediately come to mind. But the most memorable poems I encountered this year, I first ran into online, shared among friends and colleagues via Twitter and Facebook. (You can listen to three of my favorites below.)

 

And the big news in our house: Baby takes her first steps and the Tooth Fairy pays our first-grader a visit.

The Boy loses his first tooth

The Boy loses his first tooth. Photo courtesy of the author.

And for 2013: I think we’re all waiting with bated breath for the brand spanking new mnartists.org website, and so eager to show you all the bells and whistles we have in the works.

What Makes a Healthy Art Community?

Lately I have been thinking a lot about what local artists need. Over the last year we  on the mnartists.org team have been diligently planning for the new mnartists.org website.  During the discovery phase of the site rebuild, we often returned to the question that launched the mnartists project in the first place, back in […]

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Lately I have been thinking a lot about what local artists need. Over the last year we  on the mnartists.org team have been diligently planning for the new mnartists.org website.  During the discovery phase of the site rebuild, we often returned to the question that launched the mnartists project in the first place, back in 1999: What do artists need to survive and prosper in our community?

This week an article by l’étoile arts columnist Nathaniel Smith (reprinted today on mnartists.org) raised similar questions about what is needed to sustain a healthy cultural community and, specifically, which of those things truly sustain artists.  Smith quotes  The Cool School, a film about LA’s influential Ferus Gallery, and the five things founder Walter Hopps cites as necessary ingredients for a healthy art city:

1: Artists to make the work
2: Galleries to support it
3: Critics to celebrate it
4:  Museums to establish it
5: and collectors to buy it

Smith points out in his piece that Minnesota is blessed to have the requisite artists and museums in abundance.  Certainly, the nearly 20,000 members of mnartists.org provide compelling evidence of the volume, diversity and passion of the artists in Minnesota. I am not going to reiterate all of Smith’s  assessments as to the needs of the community. You should read the full piece yourself: his essay raises several direct points of critique and debate related to the list above in relation to aspects of the current local arts support structure.

But what about a creative community’s other needs?  What do you see that is missing from Hopps’s admittedly visual arts-slanted list?  Or, perhaps this list is a completely outdated model? If so, what elements for a healthy arts community would you substitute instead?

Midwesterners are quick to praise and support Minnesota’s arts scene, which can be a strength, but knee-jerk self-congratulations lead to complacency and unrealized potential. We don’t want to live in a good art community, we want to have a hand in making an exceptional art community. We want an art community with strong local support and lively dialog that is not provincial but instead nationally, even internationally relevant.

So, let’s continue this conversation and separate needs from desires. Let’s have open discussion about what is working and what isn’t.  There are the obvious things that would sure help: like more financial support for individual artists, cultivating actively engaged patrons of the arts and involved audiences; cheap space and informed, lively critical response for artists. What’s important to you? What are some more specific, feasible things that we are overlooking as we think about the vitality of our state’s arts and cultural scenes?

Now, its your turn.  What do you think?

The More Things Change…: A Redesign for access+ENGAGE

If you’re a subscriber to access+ENGAGE (and if not, you really should be), you likely noticed something different about the look and feel of the issue that hit your inbox this morning. Since the launch of our e-mag nearly seven years ago, so much has changed — in the kind and diversity of offerings available […]

Mickey Smith, “133.12-S1,” from DENUDATION, archival pigment print, 20″ x 30″, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

If you’re a subscriber to access+ENGAGE (and if not, you really should be), you likely noticed something different about the look and feel of the issue that hit your inbox this morning. Since the launch of our e-mag nearly seven years ago, so much has changed — in the kind and diversity of offerings available through mnartists.org, but also more generally, in the way everyone receives and engages with online news and information. And as our medium has evolved, mnartists.org’s “content platforms” have proliferated and grown as well, to meet the changing needs and preferences of all of you in the Minnesota arts community.

Currently, you can find our original essays, reviews, vast artist database, calendar and other resources via our flagship website and access+ENGAGE e-mag; but you can also engage with us and each other — here, on our blog on the Walker Art Center’s website, and through a number of social media, particularly via our feeds on Facebook and Twitter.

Offline, too, the reach and audience for mnartists.org’s events and programs have expanded in recent years: from Drawing Club on the Open Field and our Community Supported Art (CSA) program with Springboard for the Arts, to mnartists.org’s annual Field Trip festival with Silverwood Park, Northern Spark festivities with the Walker and Northern Lights.mn, and our print partnership with Rain Taxi Review of Books.

Mickey Smith, “363.75 N” and 363.75 T”, archival pigment print on paper, 40″x26″, 2012. Courtesy of the artist and Invisible-Exports.

With this growth, and considering the massive website rebuild we’re undergoing (due next year!), we’ve decided it’s time to step back, take stock, and reconsider how we might serve you best.  To this end, we’ve redesigned our e-mag to give the artists and arts lovers in our vibrant community a more streamlined and easily navigable entry point into mnartists.org’s riches –  editorial offerings, professional artists’ resources, and engaging offline events, opportunities and programs.

You’ll notice the revamped newsletter has a cleaner, more straightforward design; it’s one we hope invites you more readily into our core offerings: the whip-smart, original, local arts journalism that’s updated weekly on the homepage magazine and in the blog; the job listings, calls for art and other creative opportunities for artists around the state drawn from our community bulletin board; and a short-list of must-see events and programs. One thing isn’t changing: At the top of every issue of the newsletter, as always, we’ll feature art work by a different Minnesota artist. Click the banner art in the newsletter, and you’ll be directed to a little profile of that artist here, on the blog.

Mickey Smith, “159,” archival pigment print, 36″x24″, 2012. Courtesy of the artist.

Speaking of which, for the launch of our new-and-improved newsletter, our banner artist is photographer Mickey Smith. Smith is a Duluth native, with a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Minnesota-Moorhead. She has received awards from the McKnight Artist Fellowship for Photography, the Forecast Public Art Affairs, CEC ArtsLink, and Americans for the Arts. Smith currently lives in Auckland, New Zealand and is represented by INVISIBLE-EXPORTS in New York.

This issue’s banner art comes from a series of photographs, Denudation, which have just been collected in a book by the same name, with text by W. M. Hunt, published this month in collaboration with Hassla Books.

Here’s an eloquent excerpt from an essay by W.M. Hunt, “Prospero’s Shelf,” included in the newly published collection of photographs:

When you move away, you see the place you’re leaving, not the place you’re going to. You look at what you will have left behind, the shell of you, the shadow. It is the photograph’s negative.

Mickey Smith’s Denudation images have a haunted quality. They are somber, depicting empty shelves and a closet, a ladder to nowhere, tied off airless garbage bags, and discarded book spines. The Wil to Win is reconsidered.

Ms. Smith’s earlier Volume and Collocations—ebullient portraits of books, individually or in groups and on shelves—were bold and graphic. What made those pictures so effective was subtext, here made explicit—a deeper, darker unseen melancholy or despair.

It is not that these works have a sense of doom or resignation to them. They act like harbingers of some transcendence. An unseen protagonist has moved on and left this behind. Prospero throws down his book and his magic, and leaves the island. Here he has literally just taken it off the shelf, and departed. The flaying or erosion of layers of life, the denudation, yield opportunity and newness.

“To regret deeply is to live afresh,” Henry David Thoreau wrote in 1839.  Ms. Smith captures the plaintive and enigmatic and offers it as possibility.

Mickey Smith, “123,” a suite of photographs, taken with a Kodak disc camera, that Smith took at age eleven of the implosion of the Northwestern National Bank Building in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Courtesy of the artist.

Smith will be in town for a book-signing at Traffic Zone Center for Visual Art in Minneapolis, October 18, 4 to 6 p.m., 250 Third Avenue North, #308. The signing will be followed by a reception at Bev’s Wine Bar from 6 to 9 p.m., just downstairs from the gallery, in #100.

Mickey Smith will also open a related exhibition of work, her third solo show at INVISIBLE-EXPORTS in New York, late this month; also titled Denudation, the show will be on view from October 26 through December 9, 2012.

For more information on the exhibition, or to see more examples of Smith’s work, visit her website, www.mickeysmithart.com, or that of her gallery, www.invisible-exports.com.

A Community Mourns and Celebrates SooVAC’s Suzy Greenberg

Last Thursday, August 16, Suzy Greenberg, founder of two beloved Twin Cities galleries, Soo Visual Arts Center and Rosalux Gallery, died unexpectedly. A mainstay in the Minnesota visual arts community, she was, for years, an unstinting advocate for emerging artists and a savvy curator with a loyal following, known for having a sharp eye for […]

Suzy Greenberg. Photo by Tom Sweeney of the “Minneapolis Star-Tribune,” courtesy of Soo Visual Arts Center.

Last Thursday, August 16, Suzy Greenberg, founder of two beloved Twin Cities galleries, Soo Visual Arts Center and Rosalux Gallery, died unexpectedly. A mainstay in the Minnesota visual arts community, she was, for years, an unstinting advocate for emerging artists and a savvy curator with a loyal following, known for having a sharp eye for as-yet-unknown but promising talent.  She’s proved to be a nimble entrepreneur, too, shepherding her well-regarded storefront gallery in Minneapolis through several years of difficult economic conditions with aplomb and ingenuity.

Losing her has left the Twin Cities’ tight-knit art scene grief-stricken. There’ve been a number of moving remembrances published in local media in the last week (you can find the links below). Now, we’d like to invite you — Greenberg’s colleagues and friends, artists and fellow gallerists and curators — to share your favorite anecdotes and memories, below in the comments section.

According to SooVAC’s Executive Director, Carolyn Payne, a gathering in her honor is planned for Monday, September 10. For the event, SooVAC will show an exhibition of Greenberg’s work, curated by Lars Mason; people are also invited to come by the CC Club to share stories and memories in celebration of a life beautifully and generously lived, if far too short.

Payne says there’s no formal program planned, “This is just a time to come and pay tribute to her life and art, and to have a drink together in her memory at her longtime neighboring watering hole.”

 

 

Some related links:

 

A tribute to Suzy Greenberg’s life and art is planned for Monday, September 10, from 4 pm – 10 pm, at Soo Visual Arts Center (2638 Lyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis) and at the CC Club (just down the street at 2600 Lyndale Avenue South).

For updated information as the date draws nearer, check in with the gallery website: http://www.soovac.org/

Please share your favorite anecdotes and memories, your best Suzy-stories, in the comments below.

Performing Arts loves mnartists.org

That’s right, they love us so much they’re offering a great deal on tickets to 2012-2013 season shows! Get Buy-One-Get-One-FREE tickets for mnartists.org members to the following Walker Performing Arts performances listed below! Mnartists.org members should call ( 612.375.7600 ) or stop by the Walker Box Office and mention the MNARTIST deal to redeem this […]

Kettly Noël in “Correspondances”

That’s right, they love us so much they’re offering a great deal on tickets to 2012-2013 season shows!

Get Buy-One-Get-One-FREE tickets for mnartists.org members to the following Walker Performing Arts performances listed below!

Mnartists.org members should call ( 612.375.7600 ) or stop by the Walker Box Office and mention the MNARTIST deal to redeem this offer that is only good through September 15th. Learn more about each performance here: http://www.walkerart.org/performing-arts/browse/2012-2013-season

Miguel Gutierrez and the Powerful People

Sept 19-22

So Percussion

Sept 28-29

Voices of Strength

Oct 10-13

The BodyCartography Project

Oct 25-27

Nick Zammuto & Elluvium  (McGuire)

Nov 10, 2012

Choreographer’s Evening

Nov 24, 2012

Nels Cline Orchestra with David Breskin

Nov 29, 2012

A Deborah Hay Celebration

Dec 6-8

Out There 25: Rude Mechs

Jan 10-12

Out There 25: She She Pop

Jan 17-19

Out There 25: (M)imosa/Twenty Looks or Paris Burning at The Judson Church (Trajal, etc.)

Jan 24-26

Out There 25: Back to Back Theater

Jan 31-Feb 2

Ben Frost (@ Amsterdam Bar)

Feb 09, 2013

Glenn Kotche

Feb 16, 2013

Sarah Kirkland Snider Shara Worden & yMusic (@ SPCO Music Room)

Feb 26-27

Cynthia Hopkins

March 7-9

Kyle Abraham

Mar 14-16

Fatoumata Diawara @ Cedar

Apr 12, 2013

Craig Taborn & Friends

Apr 26, 2013

Elevator Repair Service

May 16-18

   
NOTE: The offer does not extend to these performances…  
Laurie Anderson

Nov 2-3 (4?)

Hofesh Shectner (@ Orpheum)

Nov 13, 2012

OUT THERE 25 Packages

(already a 40% discount)

John Zorn @ 60

Sat Apr 6

 

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