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Community Supported Art (CSA): Ten Tips for a Successful Artist Proposal

Its time for another season of the extremely popular Community Supported Art CSA Program.  We get a lot of questions regarding what makes a good proposal, what are the jurors looking for and what should be included as work samples.  In an effort to address these questions and to get better proposals, I thought it […]

Its time for another season of the extremely popular Community Supported Art CSA Program.  We get a lot of questions regarding what makes a good proposal, what are the jurors looking for and what should be included as work samples.  In an effort to address these questions and to get better proposals, I thought it was a good time to repost and update a list of tips. While this list is specific to the CSA call, most of it applies to any open call process.

If you prefer a more personal session we are presenting an info session Thursday, December 22nd at the East Lake Library (2727 East Lake Street, Minneapolis, MN ) at 6pm.  The session is free and hosted by Springboard for the Arts Andy Sturdevant and myself. (Scot Stulen from mnartists.org).  No RSVP needed.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS JANUARY 13, 2012

Proposal Tips and Frequently Asked Questions

Based on the four CSA cycles we have organized, here are some tips and other advice for crafting your proposal. Each panel is different, but this tips should help you craft a more competitive proposal. For full information about the program and application visit the submission website.

1. Be clear and specific in your proposal. Do not submit a vague proposal or one which has several projects within it. Pick one, and explain it well.  The jurors do not response well to multiple choice proposals.

2. Be clear with your language. This is not a contest awarding your writing sample…so simplify and make sure your ideas are coming across directly.  A good proposal is written in language that non-artists can understand clearly.

3. Your proposal does not need to be a functional item or have anything to do with agriculture. While the idea for the program is based on a farm CSA model, the art work does NOT need to reference its roots. Likewise, preference is not given to any work that references food culture or agriculture.

4. Can you execute your proposal within the budget, time and scope outlined? Your work samples will be used to judge not only artistic merit, but your ability to reasonably execute your proposal. For example, if you are proposing to make 50 stained glass pieces and your proposal contains work samples of book art projects, the panel will question if you can pull it off a labor intensive project in another medium.  Be realistic.

5. Be reasonable. A thousand dollars is a modest stipend. Be smart and creative in your proposal. Nobody is getting rich by making 50 pieces for $1000. However, this is an amazing marketing vehicle and opportunity to place your work in the hands of paying, eager collectors. View this as a prime marketing device and think of how you can grab a collectors attention and wet their appetite for more.

6. The most successful proposals have offered:

A. High perceived value: The shareholder feels they are getting an amazing piece for the price.

 B. Representative: The proposal relates to the artists main body of work (the shareholder feels they are getting a small piece, which is representative of the artist’s overall work). This also works to your advantage as you are hoping to reach new patrons and sell the type of work you want to produce.

C. Access: The proposal offers access or insight into the artist’s creative process. This is where several of the performing arts proposals have succeeded.

D. Exclusivity: Ignore the word commercial in the description. Its confusing in this context. What we are referring to is some artists who produce multiples in a more production sense (for example a mass produced set of greeting cards). The jurors and shareholders have responded very well to pieces that are fine art objects, unique and not something that they can easily get at another venue. So a unique edition that is exclusive or in some other way unique.

7. Successful proposals consider use and/or presentation. For example, functional ceramics, 2-D work, small sculptures all are easily understandable as to how they will be displayed or find use for the shareholder. A piece that is more un-traditional can be a successful proposal, as long as its use is at least suggested. For example, a selected proposal from last cycle was a collaboration between a textile artist and a photographer to create a bolt of fabric with fruit and vegetable PLU stickers as the pattern. This unique proposal succeed because it was an interesting artwork it left in its raw format, but the artists also included instructions for sewing the fabric into several creations, thus creating a direction for further use. Basically, if you can’t think about how it would be displayed in your home or used as a functional piece it will be problematic for most shareholders.  You want your piece to be the object they want to show all their friends.

8. Consider the presentation. Work does not need to be matted, framed or otherwise finished…and actually for the stipend it would a waste of time and money to do so. What you should consider is creative ways of presenting the pieces that may also function to protect the works. For example, a simple plastic or brown paper wrapper for prints, or foam padding around a ceramic piece with a hand tied bow. These details present well to the panel and also to the shareholder. Don’t confuse these with gimmicks, it’s still about the main work, but consideration of presentation is a part of the overall package.

9. Work Samples. The documentation portion of the proposal can be past work and does not need to be the actual offering. If you have an example of the piece…great, but if not other work samples are fine. A mockup is only needed if you think the proposal needs it and the description is not clear. This is primarily for artists proposing something very different from their regular work and the work samples are not clear.  However, your work samples should support and illustrate your proposal and not confuse the jurors.  For example, if the work samples are all watercolors and the proposal is to do ceramics that would not be a helpful presentation for the jurors.

10. In the end its about the work. Be creative and think about how you would feel if you received your proposed work as part of a share. Maximize the potential of the format, and don’t bite off more than you can handle.

 

MN-Made Holiday Shopping Cheat Sheet: Pop-up shops and last-minute art fairs

Are you starting to panic? Do you have more names than not yet to check off your holiday gift list? Have no fear. I’ve got some last-minute art fairs and pop-up shops that will help you fill those stockings and deck the halls with cool, one-of-a-kind, locally made wares, even if you’ve saved your holiday […]

Are you starting to panic? Do you have more names than not yet to check off your holiday gift list? Have no fear. I’ve got some last-minute art fairs and pop-up shops that will help you fill those stockings and deck the halls with cool, one-of-a-kind, locally made wares, even if you’ve saved your holiday shopping to the last minute.

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Local Designer Sample Sale
Friday, December 16, 7 – 9 pm
Cliché, Minneapolis

For one night only, you can pick up chic, local fashions for a steal – find samples from area designers for up to 50% off retail — at this popular Uptown clothing store.

 

Midway’s Monster Drawing Rally
Saturday, December 17, 6 – 10 pm
Midway Contemporary Art, Minneapolis

Okay – so you can read all about this annual blow-out and its stellar line-up of participating local artists elsewhere on the blog. But keep in mind: this isn’t just a fabulously art-filled evening in support of one of our state’s most lauded contemporary art galleries, it’s also an opportunity to score an original piece by some of the scene’s most accomplished makers for a mere $35. Now that’s a swank stocking stuffer.

4th Annual Vine Arts Center Holiday Sale
Saturday, December 17 (10 am – 5 pm) and Sunday, December 18 (noon – 5 pm)
Vine Arts Center, Minneapolis

You’ll find an eclectic variety of fine art and craft made by scads of Vine Arts Center member artists and guests, including sculpture, paintings, jewelry, photos, textiles, cards and more. Meet the many artists who’ve contributed goods to the sale, have some refreshments and check off a few names from your gift list.

 

Entanglement – Holiday Sale and exhibition opening
Saturday, December 17, 6 – 9pm
Fox Tax Gallery, Minneapolis

The artists whose work is featured in Fox Tax’s soon-to-open show of collage have each contributed pieces, selling for less than $100 each, which will be available for purchase during the exhibition’s opening reception this weekend. It’s a great chance to get a lovely and affordable original work, and support a good cause at the same time; all proceeds from the night’s sales go to the Children’s Cancer Research Fund. Artists include: Beth Bowman, Allen Brewer, John Diebel, Jesse Draxler, Josie Lewis, Rob McBroom, Jessica Slagle, Iam Sorlie, Vanesa Windshitl, and Hannah Frick.

Last-minute Handmade Gift Market
Monday, December 19, 5 – 9 pm
Modern Times Café, Minneapolis

Find an assortment of homewares, fancy edibles, paper goods, ceramics, clothing and other crafty doodads made by local artisans at this holiday art fair hosted by Modern Times café. Find a full list of vendors here.

 

mnartists.marketplace at the Walker Shop
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
Ongoing

You likely heard us crowing about our limited edition sets of MN artist-designed pint glasses, but get a load of the other cool things, all made by local artists, that we’ve handpicked for you: sweet handmade felt and wooden toys, and high-design tchotchkes for every occasion.

 

Soo VAC’s local artist-made prints
Soo Visual Arts Center, Minneapolis
Ongoing

Soo VAC has created gorgeous prints of work by some of the gallery’s most acclaimed local artists: including Andrea Carlson, Joe Sinness, Jennifer Davis, Amy Rice, Deuce Seven – priced from $25 and up.

 

White Rabbit Variety Pop-up Shop
Open daily, 10 am – 8 pm through December 30 (closed Christmas)
2520 Hennepin Avenue South, Minneapolis
Get the latest info via their website or Facebook page

For the month of December, you can pick up a wide array of locally made art and craft – from collage, photography, baubles and ornaments to paintings, sculpture, ceramics, and much more. Lots of up-cycled and repurposed items at every price point, representing work by more than 20 Twin Cities-based artists.

What Do Artists Need?

As mnartists.org works towards rebuilding our website in the coming year, we are also in an opportune position to refocus and reappraise how we, as an organization, can best serve artists. When my colleague, Scott Stulen, and I sat down to revisit our mission statement, we agreed benefiting artists will always be central to our […]

As mnartists.org works towards rebuilding our website in the coming year, we are also in an opportune position to refocus and reappraise how we, as an organization, can best serve artists. When my colleague, Scott Stulen, and I sat down to revisit our mission statement, we agreed benefiting artists will always be central to our mission. As we move forward with planning for the new site (new bells and whistles aside), Minnesota artists and their needs will remain core to our mission and our focus as an organization. No easy task, as artists needs vary depending on the stage they are in their career, their location, and have different needs associated with their discipline of focus.

So what is it that all artists need?

I can speculate; I’m an artist too.  Let me introduce myself: I’m Jehra Patrick and I work as Project Coordinator for mnartists.org.  I do everything from answering help-desk questions, to planning, promoting and managing our off-line programs like Drawing Club, CSA: Community Supported Art, MN Made, and mnartists.markerplace; I also assist in managing the McKnight Photo Fellowship for Photographers and work to direct artists and arts enthusiasts to the resources they need – online and otherwise. I am also a visual artist.  I’m an artist who loves to support other artists. In thinking about what artists need, I can speculate as both an artist and as someone who supports artists and interacts with artists regularly.  Here’s what I’ve got, but please feel free to chime in:

Artists need:

Exposure Artists need their work to be seen; they need an audience, they need coverage and feedback

• Community Whether it’s camaraderie with other artists, support from their local community or a network of followers

Resources Space to produce, the materials or expenses that make your work a reality and the time to make it

Professional development Artists need a plan, a business strategy to market themselves as professionals; they need the tools meet their ambitions

All of these ‘needs’ vary – and may mean different things – depending on the artist’s stage in their career. The form that each of these needs takes also varies by the artist’s discipline of focus, and another thing: What artists want. What artists want depends on their own goals, which also vary depending on where they are in their career.

Back in 1999, McKnight Foundation issued a survey to gauge the needs of artists, out of which mnartists.org was developed. So how does mnartists.org continue assess artist’s needs? Over the next year, I will continue to reach out through topical blog posts to gauge varying needs of Minnesota artists and post to respond to these needs. While there will be more formal surveys, we also welcome candid feedback and encourage you to respond!  We want to hear from you!

What do artists need? What do you need as an artist? What do you need to continue to produce your work?  To make a living?  To take your work to ‘the next stage’?

Also, how do artists’ needs differ based on what you have? What is already available to you? What is missing?

Monster Drawing Rally IV Approaches (full list of artists released)

Just in time for the holidays the annual Midway Contemporary Art Monster Drawing Rally arrives on December 17th for a night  of community art making (mixed with some gawking) and an amazing opportunity to purchase  art by local artists. For the last three years The Monster Drawing Rally has given artists living in the Twin […]

Just in time for the holidays the annual Midway Contemporary Art Monster Drawing Rally arrives on December 17th for a night  of community art making (mixed with some gawking) and an amazing opportunity to purchase  art by local artists.

For the last three years The Monster Drawing Rally has given artists living in the Twin Cities the opportunity to support Midway while simultaneously gaining exposure within the community. Over 60 artists generously donate their time and talent by drawing live at the event during three one-hour rounds beginning at 6pm, 7pm and 8pm.  Each of their drawings is available immediately for sale (first come/ first serve) for a flat price of $35.  The casual atmosphere lets visitors watch the art making process while keeping a close eye on the walls filled with finished drawings available for purchase.

For those not familiar with the event…here is what to expect.

1. There are three one-hour rounds with approximately twenty local artists working each shift.

2. This is a rare opportunity to watch and interact with an artist as they are working. As a past and current artist myself, I can say it is an interesting experience from the other side of the table as well. No hiding your miscues with an attentive audience.

3. All the work is a flat fee of $35. However, drawings may not be purchased, claimed, or snatched prior to hitting the wall. Conflicts or ties for purchasing a work will be resolved by drawing cards. Fighting, hoarding, hovering, or any other bad collector behavior will be sternly frowned upon.

4. Impulse purchasing is encouraged.

5. When you purchase the piece you will also get the contact information for the artist. If you don’t get a chance to meet them or talk to them at the event…contact them and let them know you bought their work. Artist love to meet people who  invested in their work.

some of David Leftkowitz's contributions

6. This year features an artist designed glass to hold your beverage as you mingle around the event for only $5. So there is no good excuse not to leave with at lease one artwork.

7. This is one of the most community driven and artistic centric fundraisers in the city. Not one to be missed.

Over the next few days we will release the names of all the participating artists with links to their websites so you can do a little pre-rally research and maybe discover some new talent in your community.

Here is full list of participating artists.

Jehra Patrick
Natasha Pestich
David Petersen
Christine Peterson

Allen Brewer, Famous, colored pencil on paper


Saturday, December 17, 2011
6 – 10 PM
Free admission
Midway Contemporary Art
527 Second Ave SE
Minneapolis, MN 55414

For more information please visit: www.midwayart.org/events/mdr4/

Drawings are $35 each

Souvenir cups are $5 each

Thank you to our sponsors: mnartists.org and JOIA All-Natural Soda

MN-Made holiday shopping cheat sheet: craft fairs, art sales and trunk shows

This isn’t a holiday gift guide with specific suggestions for what to get Mom, Dad, your S.O., the kids, Nana, Grandpa and that coworker-across-the-cubicle-you-chat-with-sometimes-but-don’t-really-know-so-well. (If you’d like ideas, though, you can find a few local gift guides out already this year, courtesy of the folks at Vita.mn, Minnesota Monthly, METRO magazine, or the Duluth News-Tribune. […]

This isn’t a holiday gift guide with specific suggestions for what to get Mom, Dad, your S.O., the kids, Nana, Grandpa and that coworker-across-the-cubicle-you-chat-with-sometimes-but-don’t-really-know-so-well. (If you’d like ideas, though, you can find a few local gift guides out already this year, courtesy of the folks at Vita.mn, Minnesota Monthly, METRO magazine, or the Duluth News-Tribune. No doubt more such lists are on the way shortly.)

Instead, what you’ll find here in the coming days is a brief rundown of craft fairs, pop-up shops, mom & pop independents, and various and sundry art sales and trunk shows, and online shops where you can find kick-ass, locally made art and craft. We’ll point the way to some of the best spots for buying from Minnesota artists this season, and leave figuring out what to get Auntie Whosit to you.

This weekend:

No Coast Craft-O-Rama
Friday (3 pm – 8 pm) & Saturday (9 am – 5 pm), December 2 & 3
Midtown Global Market, Minneapolis

For me, it just wouldn’t be the holidays without this, the most fabulous of the Twin Cities craft fairs. From crazy-cute duds for kids, to cheeky baby gear, and ingenious toys and stuffed critters; stylish handbags, beautifully crafted jewelry, and handmade accessories, fancy soaps, candy, and punk paper products, awesome prints, posters, letterpress, and household doodads at every price point – I swear, this well-curated local craft fair gets bigger, and more bustling every year. If you’re in town and looking to check some of your near and dear off the holiday gift list, you should go. It’s a delight to browse, and I guarantee you’ll not leave empty-handed. (You can check out all the vendors online here)

 

College of Visual Arts’ Holiday Art Sale
Preview party December 2 (5 – 8 pm, $30 admission at the door)
Sale, Saturday (10 am – 4 pm) & Sunday (noon – 4 pm), December 3 – 4
College of Visual Arts Gallery, St. Paul

This year’s 6th annual holiday art sale boasts more than 2000 pieces of original work by CVA students, faculty and alumni – most of which will be priced at less than $100. Like all student-centric events of its kind, this art sale offers budget art collectors a great shot at affordable pieces by emerging artists, not to mention the satisfaction of putting your consumer dollar toward a good cause. Word to the wise: if you’re serious about making a purchase, it’s probably worth the price of admission to stop by the preview party. The really good stuff tends to get snapped up early. If you’ve got a bit more scratch to spend, you could also bid on work in the silent auction of pieces made by friends of CVA. All proceeds from both the silent auction and sale go to support the college’s scholarship programs.

 

Color Wheel Gallery’s Holiday Bazaar
Color Wheel Gallery, Minneapolis
Saturday (6 – 10 pm) & Sunday (noon – 6 pm), December 3 – 4

Gallery proprietor and artist Tammy Ortegon is hosting a local art and craft fair at her shop, including paintings, prints, collages, photography, and mixed media work by a bunch of Minnesota artists, but also crafty stuff by local folks, like handmade jewelry, knitted winter things, baby gear, and the like.

 

Rochester Art Center’s Gallery Shop Holiday Sale & Trunk Show
Rochester Art Center, Rochester
Sunday, December 4, noon – 5 pm (admission is free)

For its 6th annual gallery shop and trunk sale, the RAC is offering art and craft by a variety of regional artists, including glass & beaded jewelry, handmade housewares and kitchen vessels, fiber arts, Amaglyphe art packs and books, and deals on the usual cool stuff on sale in the gift shop.

 

The Grand Meander
December 3, 8:30 am through 5 pm
Along Grand Avenue in St. Paul

Start the day with breakfast with Santa and a visit with the big man’s reindeer; the kids will be thrilled by the fire truck and trolley rides, hayrides, caroling, and a community Christmas tree-lighting later in the day. While you’re in the neighborhood, stop by Grand Hand Gallery – particularly if you’re in the market for higher-end, locally made art and craft. Their Handcrafted Holidays selection is carefully curated and just lovely.

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>>Next up: The best mom & pop retailers, pop-up stores, and online outfits for MN-made art & crafts this season >>

Thirty Things for which to be Thankful (as a Minnesota Artist)

It’s Thanksgiving week. Before I (and probably most of you) take a few days off for family, football and perhaps some shopping I wanted to take a moment to list some of the things for which I am personally thankful. As an artist, musician and art administrator I get the privilege of working with a […]

It’s Thanksgiving week. Before I (and probably most of you) take a few days off for family, football and perhaps some shopping I wanted to take a moment to list some of the things for which I am personally thankful. As an artist, musician and art administrator I get the privilege of working with a broad creative community in Minnesota. As artists it’s easy to dwell on the negative, the lost grant, the rejection letter and all the challenges and hardships of this career path. Those unfulfilled aspirations aside, Minnesota is a pretty nice place to live and work as an artist. So for my Thanksgiving reflection I submit thirty things I am thankful for as a Minnesota artist.

The fear with any list like this is that I will miss something … so please add  your personal additions to my list in the comments section. So here we go … in no specific order.

1. Community: I am thankful to be part of a welcoming, vibrant and supportive artists community. This resource cannot be underestimated and will continue to keep many of us here and attract others.

2. Institutions: For world class institutions like the Walker Art Center, Guthrie and MIA. We shouldn’t take you for granted.

3. The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden: I drive by it every day and don’t take advantage of it enough. I am reminded every time I see Spoonbridge and Cherry how public sculpture can become an icon for a whole city.

4. The Rochester Art Center: Quietly building a reputation for cutting edge exhibitions and public programs,  the RAC has premiered work by established international artists (Inigo Manglano-Ovalle, Roman Signer, Tony Tassett and upcoming Miguel Calderón) to its ongoing showcase of  the regions finest mid-career and emerging artists (Bruce Tapola, Chris Larson, David Leftkowitz, Warren Mackenzie). Always worth the drive.

5. Innovative out-state programs like ARThouse and Pilot Mound Design

6. Rural America Contemporary Art group. An incredibly active Facebook group started by artist and Minnesota State University Mankato professor Brian Frink to network the activities of rural artists working primarily in Minnesota.

7. Works Progress: Colin Kloecker and Shanai Matteson drive Works Progress, an artist-led public design studio responsible for everything from the Give and Take lecture series and Salon Saloon (with Andy Sturdevant) to, most recently, A Public Thing.

8. Foundation funding: Every time I speak to visiting artists from other states I am reminded how fortunate we are as Minnesota artists for the financial support in the state. The  generous contributions of foundations like the Jerome and McKnight foundations support both organizations and individual artists throughout the state. It isn’t like this everywhere.

9. The Legacy Amendment: Another unique accomplishment and symbol of the support for the arts within the state.

10. Galleries: Midway Contemporary, Franklin Artworks, SooVAC and the Soap Factory and many others consistently exhibiting new work by local, national and international artists. We are lucky to have a group of long-standing spaces in the community that have built reputations well beyond the state and also provide a venue to show artists.

First Avenue and 7th St. Entry, by http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevinyezbick/

11. Killer music scene. Vibrant as always.  I could list dozens of musicians here … but I’ll save for another post.

12. Open Field: Shameless plug…but I am very proud and thankful for it.

13. Monster Drawing Rally Favorite Fundraiser/Organized Chaos/Budding Collector Opportunity/Art Community Party of the Year

14. Art Hounds: Something to look forward to on Minnesota Public Radio each and every week. It’s nice to have a format to just be a fan of others work and not a marketing plug.

15. All my friends and colleagues: My incredible colleagues at the Walker and my mnartists.org team of Susannah Schouweiler, Jehra Patrick and Katie Hill. I feel fortunate to work with such talented, inspiring and fun people everyday. And to all my artist friends for keeping me motivated, challenged and hungry.

16. Art Shanty Projects: They are back!

17. Silverwood Park: Part of the Three Rivers Park System, Silverwood is an arts focused city park and one of the best kept secrets in the city. If you haven’t been there yet .. you need to go.

Drawing Club at Northern Spark 2011

18. Northern Spark: One of the best reasons to stay up all night since I was thirteen….and mark your calendar for June 9–10 for its return. We have big plan … think Smore Bar and more glow sticks.

19. Springboard for the Arts: Unrivaled resource for artists throughout the state co-creator of the very popular CSAart program with mnartists.

20. Theater, dance, film and all the other cultural opportunities I do not take part in enough. Even though I don’t attend that often, I am so glad you are here.

21. Social media: The adoption of social media by the art community has created an amazing vehicle for exchanging ideas, event promotion, debate, trouble shooting, resourcing and praise.  I don’t know how I would do my job without it anymore.

22.CraftersLocal 612 and No Coast Craft-o-rama: Yay for the craft scene! The No Coast Craft-o-Rama is a craft event that began in December 2005 as a way to feature a variety of designers, artists, crafters and other talented creators of unique handmade goods. It’s coming up in 2011 on Friday, December 2 (3 p.m. to 8 p.m.) and Saturday, December 3 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) at the Midtown Global Exchange building.

23. MAEP: The longstanding is Minnesota Artist Exhibition Program is unique in both its organization and the opportunity it presents for Minnesota Artists.

24. Forecast Public Art: Another national arts leader in our backyard.

25. The weather: Seriously, without the weather keeping us inside for nine months of the year I doubt we would have so many amazing musicians, artists and writers….seriously.

26: Personal opportunities to work with and learn from the older generation of artists such as Judy Onofrio and Warren MacKenzie. I feel uniquely blessed to have had the opportunity to work with each of them on exhibitions in the past and to recognize their ongoing influence on younger generations of artists.

27: New galleries and projects like Tarnish and Gold, XY&Z, Faux Poco, They wont find us here, and Hopsack Painting Co.

28. A well-rounded community featuring a robust array of cultural and sporting events. No, I don’t want arts funding redirected for football stadiums, but art and sports can get along and we need them both.

29. I am thankful to have a job where I can serve other artists and the art community. I hope that I can do a small bit to make this a better place to live and work. I am also thankful that I have a job that includes drawing with artists on summer afternoons, finding sheep, concerts in parking garages, making lawnmower musical instruments and campfire concerts.

30. And last … but should be first on the list … my incredibly kind, tolerant and patient wife and family. I couldn’t do any of the things I do without your assistance and support.

Happy Thanksgiving!

So Much Art, So Little Time!

TIPSHEET: November 16, 2012 I love, love, love our art community – there’s never a shortage of things to do!  Too much art is a good thing – we’re lucky to live somewhere where there’s so much going on that you can’t decide which event to attend, org to support, or art to buy – […]

TIPSHEET: November 16, 2012

I love, love, love our art community – there’s never a shortage of things to do!  Too much art is a good thing – we’re lucky to live somewhere where there’s so much going on that you can’t decide which event to attend, org to support, or art to buy – with much going on at the same time it’s hard to catch it all!

Here’s a short list of amazing things to do and see this week – I’ll let you decide!

 

Give to the Max! Wednesday, November 16

No need to wait until November 24th, start saying ‘thanks’ to MN arts organizations for all they do for our community, today, through Give to the Max!  So many to choose from, thankfully you don’t have to pick just one.  While giving feels good on it’s own, I have to give props to College of Visual Arts for their clever fundraising campaigns: Get Busted enters gifts of $5 or more into a drawing to win a bronze cast of your own likeness and Face from Space which paints top donors faces on top the roof of the school. Google maps, anyone?

 

 

 

Artist Talks and Album Releases Thursday, November 17

Start at 6 pm to swing by the Walker Shop and pick up your set of limited edition pint glasses featuring artwork of MN’s finest.  Then head over to the MAEP Galleries at 7 pm for an artist talk with Jennifer Danos, Natasha Pestich, and Marcus Young as they discuss their current exhibition Semblances, now on view. At 9 pm make your way to the Turf Club for Brian Laidlaw’s album release for wolf, wolf, wolf.  Brian joined us for Campfire Concerts in 2010 and charmed audiences at Field Trip this past September – we know this album will be great!

 

 

 

 

Art Sales and Live Comedy Thursday November 17 and Friday, November 18

The MCAD Art Sale is a thing of lore in the Twin Cities, the walls are teeming with art of high quality and modest price tags.  Get in Thursday for first pick, Friday for a reduced cover, or Saturday for free.  Makes me wish I had more wall-space!

Another recommendation that spans both Thursday and Friday, the talented and hilarious Shane Hawley will be recording his first album Shane Hawley is Hypersensitive at The Comedy Corner Underground 8 pm both evenings.  You can expect jokes, poetry and maybe dragons….

 

 

 

 

More art! Saturday, November 19

Women artists are encouraged to attend a drop in workshop hosted by mnartists.org at the Walker Art Center’s Art Lab to digitize and upload work samples to rawwar.org and mnartists.org in part with the !WAR Women Art Revolution documentary screening. Later on, head over to Fox Tax to check out Making Progress | Art by Andy DuCett and Kristina Mooney.  Both artists make use of photography, collage and drawing to reconfigure and renew our cultures stories and sense of time.

 

mnartists.marketplace: Fall 2011 Featured Artists

  Over at mnartists.org, we’ve been getting really pumped about this new partnership with the Walker Shop, mnartists.marketplace, which opens on November 17th – just in time for the holidays! Providing a new opportunity for Minnesota artists, collectors and patrons, mnartists.marketplace is a mini-store within the Walker Shop devoted to the sales of local art, […]

 

Over at mnartists.org, we’ve been getting really pumped about this new partnership with the Walker Shop, mnartists.marketplace, which opens on November 17th – just in time for the holidays!

Providing a new opportunity for Minnesota artists, collectors and patrons, mnartists.marketplace is a mini-store within the Walker Shop devoted to the sales of local art, artistic wares and art inspired objects.

In addition to a curated selection of consignment pieces from local artists, the mnartists.marketplace features twice-yearly juried calls for art.  Works from these calls are selected and incorporated into a specific limited edition series of objects.  The Fall 2011 series is a set of pint glasses featuring artwork from six Minnesota artists. It gets even better — each set of six pint glasses comes with a voucher for two complimentary beers at Gather by D’Amico!

In production as we speak, this limited edition of only 250 sets of pint glasses will be a hot commodity as the gifting season approaches… I know I’ll be at the Walker Shop right away on November 17th to snag a few sets for the art-minded, hip, and/or beer-drinking folks on my holiday shopping list.

We’re excited to share more information about the featured artists and their work, so check them out because there’s definitely something for everyone in this eclectic mix.

 

mnartists.marketplace limited edition pint glass artists and their designs

Michon Weeks, Stingray, 2011, ink on paper digitally colored

Michon Weeks
Stingray, 2011
ink on paper, digitally colored

Michon Weeks is a visual artist living in Watertown, Minnesota. She received her master of fine arts degree in drawing and painting from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and her bachelor of arts degree from Iowa State University, Ames. In 2011, Michon was awarded a Minnesota Art Legacy Grant to create 20 etched glass drawings for the windows of the Marshall- Lyon County Library in Marshall, Minnesota. She has developed a distinct drawing system in which she transforms objects by constructing them in isometric perspective within an irregular grid. www.michonweeks.com

 

Craig Eliason, Ambivalent, 2011, digital image

Craig Eliason
Ambivalent, 2011
digital image

Craig Eliason founded a digital type foundry, Teeline Fonts, in 2010. The Ambivalent design uses his Ambicase Fatface font (2011), an experimental typeface in which each letter combines its traditional lowercase and uppercase forms into one. Eliason is a professor of art history at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. His research centers on the history of type design and typography, and that informs his work as a type designer. http://www.fontshop.com/fonts/foundry/teeline_fonts/

 

Christy Johnson, Babe the Blue Ox, digital image

Christy Johnson
Babe The Blue Ox
digital image

Christy Johnson’s work is a representation of her life experiences, as well as the emotions and senses she’s tuned into at the time of each piece’s creation. She designs with her computer and with her hands, creating illustrations, greeting cards, mixed-media shadowboxes, digital collages, and pastel and colored-pencil drawings. Her background in graphic design, illustration, photography, and writing helps keep her creations varied. Johnson finds inspiration in type, color combinations, patterns, travel, and music. www.redshoes26design.com

 

Steven Lang, Receipt, digital image

Steven Lang
Receipt
digital image

Artist and writer Steven Lang received his BFA from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. He has recently exhibited at Rosalux Gallery, Soo Visual Arts Center, and the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and was included in the 2009 Milkweed Editions anthology Fiction on a Stick. Lang lives in Minneapolis. www.stevenlang.net

 

 

Max Mose, Fruit Tree, pen and ink drawing digitally colored

Max Mose
Fruit Tree
pen and ink drawing, digitally colored

Max Mose is an independent cartoonist and illustrator based out of St. Paul, Minnesota. He is a recent MFA graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies, which is located in dreamy, picturesque, slightly dilapidated White River Junction, Vermont. His self-published comics work has often been described as “deliberately weird.” www.maxmose.wordpress.com.

 

 

Andy DuCett, Untitled (Careful, now), found imagery on found photograph

Andy DuCett
Untitled (Careful, now)
Found imagery on found photograph

Andy DuCett received his MFA from the University of Illinois and BFA from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. He currently teaches at the College of Visual Art in St. Paul, the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and the University of Wisconsin-Stout. His work has been shown in galleries in Chicago, San Francisco, New York City, Milwaukee and Honolulu, as well as many Twin Cities locations.  He has been published in New American Paintings, Vita.mn, Paper Darts, The Portland Mercury, Illiterate Magazine, DailyServing.com, as well as publications in Toronto, Berlin, Tokyo, and London.  He received a 2009 Minnesota Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant, allowing him to travel to Tokyo, Japan and has been featured on MN Original and interviewed by PBS.  His next project is a solo exhibition at The Soap Factory in Minneapolis in the fall of 2012. http://andyducett.com.

 

mnartists.marketplace curated consignment artists:

Timothy Haugen, Fantastic Toys, Fawns

Fantastic Toys
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Fantastic Toys brings out the antsy pants feeling of being a kid in a toy store. It may be just a smile or giant squeals of delight, but they make people happy. Inspired by Japanese crafts, these kawaii (which is Japanese for super cute) soft toys are the latest spin of the indie plush craze.

Timothy Haugen crafts his Fantastic Toys with the highest attention to detail and with real wool felt.

 

Amelia Schmelzer, Frippery Factory, carrot cake magnet

Frippery Factory
Northfield, Minnesota

Seventeen-year-old Amelia Schmelzer has been sculpting miniature food for almost half of her life. What started as mooshing clay into little pies according to the directions found in a library book has evolved into a small business that is now her high school job.

One of Amelia’s guiding principles as an artist is to play with the connections we all have to food. Conjuring memories of an idyllic Saturday breakfast or a favorite birthday cake is the magic the miniature food performs. From miniature tater tots for dollhouse collectors to cannoli earrings for Italian food fanatics, Amelia’s tiny food can be found in private collections around the world. She hopes to evoke good times and good eats by creating tiny, eye-catching versions of real dishes.

 

Stacey Thompson, Gentry Night, framed moustache

Gentry Night Studios
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Influenced by her mother and both of her grandmothers, Stacey Thompson learned to sew, cross-stitch, crochet and make jewelry at a very young age. She and her sister always had plenty of craft items surrounding them growing up and Stacey credits her dad for buying them all of the craft supplies they ever needed. Her first introduction to a sewing machine was when she was eight years old and her mother taught her and her sister how to sew their own shorts. She remembers how much fun it was to pick out the fabric for their custom clothing.

Today Stacey creates whimsical creatures and objects as Gentry Night Studios. The business was named after her favorite nephew. One day he told her sister, “Mommy, I’m an orange owl and my name is Gentry Night.” Her nephew loves owls and so does Stacey. Her first creation was, of course, an orange owl named Gentry Night.

 

Tommy and Kristy Kronquist, The Medium Control, chair coasters

The Medium Control
Duluth, Minnesota

A product of the snow/skate culture, designer Tommy Kronquist decided to channel his creative inspiration into various mediums. In 2001, a collection of t-shirts was released and The Medium Control was born.
As a designer, he continues to create through multiple mediums: identity creation, web design, and product design. Today, Tommy and his wife Kristy get their hands dirty screen printing their goods in Duluth, Minnesota. The ever growing collection of designed inspired goods includes apparel, prints, bags and more.

 

Chelsea Raine Thorson, Raine Design, tiny town

Raine Design
Moorhead, Minnesota

Chelsea Raine Thorson is an Architectural Designer who recently graduated with a Master’s Degree in Architecture. Surrounded by a family of artists, she has been getting her hands dirty since day one. She found her passion for concrete in the early years of her architectural education, captivated by the idea of creating solid where once was void. As the architectural coursework became more complex, Chelsea found comfort in the straightforwardness of casting small-scale objects in solid concrete in her own time. After graduation, the decision to pursue handmade concrete jewelry and concrete object design came naturally, as the alternative seemed to be staring at a computer screen drafting someone else’s designs. With the belief that design should be an intimate, personal, hands-on experience, Chelsea started “Raine Design”, a small business dedicated to simply designed handmade jewelry and modern housewares in her home studio.

The “Tiny City” series of concrete houses is a modern look at architecture and our western idea of “home”. Investigating the icon for “house”, in the American sense, began shortly after returning to Minnesota after a 4 month stay in India. The set reflects on the consistencies and differences between cultural imagery and sense of place

 

Dan Sattler-Reimer, jet-pack bear

Dan Sattler-Reimer
St. Paul, Minnesota

Dan Sattler-Reimer has difficulty pinpointing what in his life directly influenced the things he creates: Was it growing up in a developing country surrounded by hardship? Or was it encountering a personal brand of hardship through recent cancer treatment? Whatever the case, what Dan believes now is that more often than not, the problems that we think we have can seem pretty insignificant when the bigger picture comes into view. In other words, life can be taken a little too seriously. Dan finds it helpful to have small reminders of that around. His felted creations are meant to have a spark of levity to them, to bring a smile. They are happy critters, solving problems in creative ways or just being a little goofy. The hope is that they bring joy to others.

 

Jeff Longtin, Sixdot, braille mug

Sixdot
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Jeff Longtin has been making pots since 1980. First using the potter’s wheel, he soon turned to hand building, and then to slip casting. In the process of slip casting the artist makes a plaster mold and uses the mold to cast the piece.

Over the years Jeff has exhibited his ceramic ware in shows locally and nationally. He introduced Sixdot Braille Products in 1997. Braille mugs are collected by customers around the world, most notably the Helen Keller National Center, in Sands Point NY, and the American Council of the Blind of Ohio. The mugs are made of porcelain clay with a lead free glaze.

 

Justin and Kathleen Smith, Smiling Tree Toys, wooden camera

Smiling Tree Toys
Lamberton, Minnesota

Justin and Kathleen Smith are fun-loving kids at heart with a deep appreciation for living simply, being kind to Mother Nature, and creating thoughtful, handmade gifts. They handcraft Smiling Tree Toys in their family woodshop in rural, southwestern Minnesota using local and sustainably sourced hardwoods.

All Smiling Tree Toys products are finished with a homegrown blend of organic camelina oil and beeswax, both grown on their family’s land. Former Peace Corps Volunteers, Justin and Kathleen donate to Peace Corps worldwide youth projects for every toy sold.

 

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Open late Thursday, 11 am-9 pm
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About mnartists.org

The mission of mnartists.org is to improve the lives of Minnesota artists and provide access to and engagement with Minnesota’s arts culture. mnartists.org is an online database of Minnesota artists and organizations from all disciplines. It offers Minnesota-based artists a central gathering place, marketplace, and community hub on the Web. It offers the public a new way to explore art and get to know artists. In addition to providing artists and organizations with a Web page containing images and information, mnartists.org provides news and features about the local arts scene from a variety of sources. mnartists.org was developed as the result of a survey of Minnesota artists conducted by The McKnight Foundation, which revealed the survival struggles of individual artists. The McKnight Foundation partnered with the Walker Art Center’s New Media Initiatives group to develop mnartists.org.

mnartists.org is a project of The McKnight Foundation and the Walker Art Center.

Heated Debates, Hot Design and a potential Fire-starter: Arts v. Sports, Women in Design, and Behavioral Art at the MIA

As temperatures cool, leaves begin to change color (and immediately fall), and calls for “winter” art pop-up on our News and Opps board over at mnartists.org, I fear the inevitable: winter in Minnesota is coming.  However, there are a few Minnesotan happenings of late that are warming my heart and/or fueling my fire despite the […]

As temperatures cool, leaves begin to change color (and immediately fall), and calls for “winter” art pop-up on our News and Opps board over at mnartists.org, I fear the inevitable: winter in Minnesota is coming.  However, there are a few Minnesotan happenings of late that are warming my heart and/or fueling my fire despite the brisk air that chills my poorly insulated living space. (more…)

New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) Presents on Resources for Artists

Calling all artists, art students and teachers, arts organizations, and basically anyone interested resources for artists! What are you doing next Tuesday, October 25th? At 7 pm you should come to Midway Contemporary Art Library (527 Second Avenue Southeast, Mpls, MN) for an excellent presentation by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) who […]


Calling all artists, art students and teachers, arts organizations, and basically anyone interested resources for artists!

What are you doing next Tuesday, October 25th?

At 7 pm you should come to Midway Contemporary Art Library (527 Second Avenue Southeast, Mpls, MN) for an excellent presentation by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) who are in town to talk about the services, opportunities and other support they offer artists.  This is a free presentation that will be well worth the time, and perhaps particularly of interest to young artists and students – so help mnartists.org spread the word…

 
Artists in all disciplines looking for jobs, opportunities, grants and professional development are invited to attend a presentation about the free and low-cost national services and resources that Artspire and the New York Foundation offer to them. Eleanor Whitney, Program Officer for External Affairs and Fiscal Sponsorship from Artspire, a program of the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) will present on Artspire/NYFA’s resources, fundraising and support programs available nationwide for artists at every stage in their careers.

The presentation is geared to individual artists across disciplines and small/emerging arts organizations and will cover Artspire/NYFA’s extensive resources, fundraising and support programs. Visual, performing, literary artists, musicians and filmmakers are all encouraged to attend.

This free presentation will be held on Tuesday, October 25, 2011 at 7pm at Midway Contemporary Art. It will allow room for Q&A and follow up with participants.

RSVP on facebook

 

Presenter Eleanor Whitney is a Program Officer for External Affairs at the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) where she works to connect artists to NYFA’s extensive services and resources. She also provides technical assistance and fundraising support to artists in the NYFA’s Artspire Fiscal Sponsorship program. Prior to NYFA she worked at the Rubin Museum of Art, where she was the Coordinator of Educational Resources and produced audio tours, videos, and interactive websites. Previously, she was the Academic Programs Coordinator at the Brooklyn Museum where she planned and implemented public programs for adults, taught university students in the museum’s galleries, and oversaw a professional development internship program for university students as well as academic outreach. She has also worked as a Development Assistant at POV/American Documentary.

For more information about NYFA’s programs please visit:

NYFA Source (www.nyfa.org/source) is the most extensive national online directory of awards, services, and programs for artists. Listings include over 8,000 arts organizations, award programs, service programs, and publications for individual artists across the country.

Fiscal Sponsorship (www.artspire.org) is a critical way for individual artists, artists’ collaborative projects, and emerging arts organizations in all disciplines to apply for funding usually available only to organizations with 501(c)(3) nonprofit status.

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