Blogs Crosscuts News

Kiarostami: Despite Filmmaking Ban, Iran’s Jafar Panahi Has Completed Another Film

When we opened the remodeled Walker Cinema last June, we selected This Is Not a Film by Iranian Jafar Panahi as one our first screenings. His “film”–made during his house arrest in Tehran and reflecting on his pending six-year prison sentence and 20-year ban on making movies–was an in-the-moment diary tinged with humor but also […]

Jafar Panahi

When we opened the remodeled Walker Cinema last June, we selected This Is Not a Film by Iranian Jafar Panahi as one our first screenings. His “film”–made during his house arrest in Tehran and reflecting on his pending six-year prison sentence and 20-year ban on making movies–was an in-the-moment diary tinged with humor but also the very real urgency of a man condemned and an artist silenced.

Today fellow Iranian, Abbas Kiarostami, announced Panahi has made another film.

“He has happened to have made his second film since he received his sentence,” Kiarostami tells IndieWire. “After his sentencing he made the film that played at Cannes, and since then he has made another. I guess it will be shown at another festival. So he is making films in Iran. I don’t know why, but that’s a reality people cannot deal with.”

“Some people stay in Iran and undergo the censorship, working however they can. Others, like me, decided to work elsewhere,” he added.

The power of cinema cannot be stopped.

Introducing Crosscuts

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs, and with the release of our new homepage back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the opportunity to rebrand each of our core blogs, focus […]

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs, and with the release of our new homepage back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the opportunity to rebrand each of our core blogs, focus our offerings, and give readers a better sense of what they’ll find inside. Don’t worry though, the name might have changed, but this is still the blog of the Film/Video department, and we’re committed to bringing you the continuation and epic conclusion of Still Dots, as well as the random discoveries and thoughts on film from the Walker and beyond—crosscuts, if you will, in the world of moving images. Behold the blue and pink flag!

Walker Film/Video Weighs In: The Greatest Films of All Time

Sight and Sound Magazine unveiled the highly anticipated results of their ambitious survey of the Top 50 Greateat Films of All Time last week with much hubbub. What started in 1952, and has been published every ten years since, has built into a critical mass of film glory that’s hard not to revel in. Tallying 846 top ten lists from critics […]

Sight and Sound Magazine unveiled the highly anticipated results of their ambitious survey of the Top 50 Greateat Films of All Time last week with much hubbub. What started in 1952, and has been published every ten years since, has built into a critical mass of film glory that’s hard not to revel in. Tallying 846 top ten lists from critics worldwide representing votes for 2,045 different films, Sight and Sound’s poll is about as definitive as you are going to get in the feverishly opinionated arena of film criticism. The big news for the 2012 edition is that, after 50 years, Citizen Kane has been toppled from the number one spot by Alfred Hitchcock’s grand mystery wrapped up in the bun of Kim Novak’s hair, otherwise known as Vertigo.

With nary a fear a heights nor a newspaper mogul in sight, Walker Film/Video staff weighs in with their picks for the greatest films of all time: 

Dean Otto, Associate Curator

In the Mood for Love (2000) Wong Kar-Wai
The Marriage of Maria Braun (1979)  Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974) Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Imitation of Life (1959) Douglas Sirk
The Passion of Joan of Arc (1927) Carl Theodor Dreyer
Satyricon (1969) Federico Fellini
Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles (1975) Chantal Akerman
La Jetee (1962) Chris Marker
A Movie  (1958 ) Bruce Conner
Metropolis (1927) Fritz Lang

Emily Davis, Bentson Researcher

A Pitcher of Colored Light (2007) Robert Beavers
Observando el Cielo (2007) Jeanne Liotta
Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania (1971 -1972) Jonas Mekas
At Sea (2007) Peter Hutton
Ten Skies (2004) James Benning
Fog Line (1970) Larry Gottheim
A Movie (1958) Bruce Conner
Wavelength (1967) Michael Snow
Zorns Lemma (1970) Hollis Frampton
An Injury to One (2002) Travis Wilkerson

Jeremy Meckler, Intern

Pierrot Le Fou (1965) Jean Luc Godard
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Woody Allen
Sans Soleil (1983) Chris Marker
Fitzcarraldo (1982) Werner Herzog
Last Year at Marienbad (1961) Allain Resnais
I Was Born But… (1932) Yasujiro Ozu
Blue Velvet (1986) David Lynch
The Third Man (1949) Carol Reed
Days of Heaven (1978) Terrence Malick
F for Fake (1973) Orson Welles

Matt Levine, Intern

Les Vampires (1915) Louis Feuillade
Strike (1925) Sergei Eisenstein
City Lights (1930) Charlie Chaplin
L’Atalante (1934) Jean Vigo
Late Spring (1949) Yasujiro Ozu
Ugetsu (1953) Kenji Mizoguchi
Andrei Rublev (1966) Andrei Tarkovsky
Mouchette (1967) Robert Bresson
Playtime (1967) Jacques Tati
Yi Yi (A One and a Two) (2000) Edward Yang

Kathie Smith, Program Manager

Branded to Kill (1967) Seijun Suzuki
A Brighter Summer Day (1991) Edward Yang
Floating Clouds (1955) Mikio Naruse
In the Mood For Love (2000) Wong Kar-wai
Late Spring (1949) Yasujiro Ozu
Life of Oharu (1953) Kenji Mizoguchi
Napoleon (1927) Abel Gance
Pierrot Le Fou (1965) Jean Luc Godard
San Soleil (1983) Chris Marker
Stalker (1975) Andrei Tarkovsky

Méliès is Having a Moment

Filmmaker Georges Méliès has had quite the year, what with being the centerpiece of this year’s most Oscar-nominated film (Scorsese’s Hugo), featured in our exhibition Midnight Party (obviously the biggest deal), and now the raison d’être of AIR’s new album, a soundtrack written on occasion and for the color restoration of Le Voyage Dans La Lune (A Trip […]

Image via Lobster Films, Groupama Gan Foundation for Cinema and Technicolor Foundation for Cinema Heritage

Filmmaker Georges Méliès has had quite the year, what with being the centerpiece of this year’s most Oscar-nominated film (Scorsese’s Hugo), featured in our exhibition Midnight Party (obviously the biggest deal), and now the raison d’être of AIR’s new album, a soundtrack written on occasion and for the color restoration of Le Voyage Dans La Lune (A Trip To The Moon).  It’s a somewhat serendipitous happening, considering that Le Voyage, his most famous film, was made over one hundred years ago.

Black & white version of Méliès' film, as seen in the Midnight Party exhibition

Of course, restoring the color version of Le Voyage was no easy process and actually began in 1993, when archivists in Barcelona uncovered a reel that Méliès himself had colored, frame by frame, to screen on special occasions. It was, to put it lightly, in very poor form. The completed color restoration premiered at Cannes last May accompanied by AIR’s new soundtrack (completed in a month-long time frame). So inspired by the process, AIR bulked up the 14-minute soundtrack to a 30-minute album, released today and available for streaming through NPR’s First Listen. If you didn’t make it to Cannes, or catch one of the handfuls of screenings around the world, the restored film is included (albeit on DVD or digitally) with album downloads and purchases.

Below, a look at the colorful (and now noisy) parade scene (featured recently on All Things Considered):

If you’re not familiar with this film and you haven’t heard of Méliès …don’t worry. I was in the same boat until Midnight Party came along, honestly. He’s referred to as the “cinemagician” and “the father of special effects” (and so on), held in high esteem for his incredibly clever special effects wizardry done entirely by hand. He began his career as a stage magician and, after seeing a Lumière brothers film, began to make his own, transferring his tricks to film and creating many new ones.

Jeremy (who usually writes in this blog), clued me into this film-making magic tidbit:

For really amazing sequences like this one he would actually pass the same unexposed film through the camera 6 or 7 times before he was finished. If he screwed up any of those times the whole process would be ruined. That is nuts! He was able to get this kind of to-the-frame precision by having the camera (that he built himself from a modified Lumière bros projector) bolted to the floor in his studio, and by keeping a metronome next to the camera operator, so he knew how fast to crank it.

 

Another method involved cloaking part of the set in a black cloth where Méliès wanted to insert an effect, shooting the scene, then re-shooting the exact same scene but with everything else covered except for where the special effect was to be. By cloaking scenes in black, the film wasn’t exposed, so he could go back, align the film perfectly, and create a flawless scene without risking double exposure . Along with envisioning fantastic scenarios and stories, he was also a meticulous master planner.

Finally, below is a shot of a few strips of the original film as they found it in 1993. Over 14,000 frames had to be carefully pieced together (after unpeeling the petrified film millimeter by millimeter).   The Foundation Technicolor for Film Heritage and The Foundation Groupama Gan for Cinema have also published a book about Méliès (which includes a chapter titled LunAIR! and pictures of him at this Montparnasse train station toy shop) and the process of restoration, A Trip to the Moon Back in Color, which you can read online here (if you like page flippy noises and read French) or here (for a PDF with more English sections).

Image via Lobster Films, Groupama Gan Foundation for Cinema and Technicolor Foundation for Cinema Heritage

Israeli Delegation Tries to Block “Miral” Screening at United Nations

  Miral is the final film in the Julian Schnabel: Artist Director Retrospective.  This Friday, director Julian Schnabel will introduce Miral for its Minneapolis premiere and engage in an audience Q & A immediately following the screening. Saturday, Julian will sit down with Walker chief curator Darsie Alexander for a Regis Dialogue. Following its world […]

 

Julian Schnabel directs actors on the set of Miral in Jerusalem

Miral is the final film in the Julian Schnabel: Artist Director Retrospective This Friday, director Julian Schnabel will introduce Miral for its Minneapolis premiere and engage in an audience Q & A immediately following the screening. Saturday, Julian will sit down with Walker chief curator Darsie Alexander for a Regis Dialogue.

Following its world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, Miral has toured festivals, and is scheduled to screen tonight at the United Nations General Assembly. But this film is dealing with material so controversial that the Israeli delegation has stepped in to try to stop the screening. Upset by its portrayal of Israel, deputy chief of Israel’s delegation to the UN Haim Waxman called it “a clearly political and one-sided film, which advances the Palestinian agenda…it is difficult to understand the intolerable ease with which the decision was made to screen a commercial film in the General Assembly hall–something which in itself is unusual and unacceptable.” Waxman continued, insisting that this film brings the “central stage, again, to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, which already receives too much attention at the UN.”

Despite their complaints, the General Assembly president, Swiss diplomat Joseph Deiss, has denied requests to cancel the screening saying that the film tells a story about peace. Rula Jebrael (the film’s screenwriter and author of the book that the film is based on) responded, saying “Miral is a story about human beings, Palestinian, Israeli, Muslim, Jewish and Christian, and it is a film about love, education, understanding and peace. ” Schnabel, said of the film, “Obviously it’s a Palestinian story, but it’s very important that an American Jewish person tell a Palestinian story.”

Harvey Weinstein, a producer and distributer of Miral has been defending this project since he signed on to distribute it, appearing on CNN with Piers Morgan and elsewhere. In response to criticism, Weinstein said “The simple answer is if you don’t tell the story from both sides, you will never understand…I know you’re not supposed to be political, but you can’t exist in this world if you aren’t.” He continued in a later interview, saying “As a Jewish American, I can categorically state that I would not be releasing a film that was flagrantly biased towards Israel or Judaism. Miral tells a story about a young Palestinian woman, but that does not make it a polemic. By stifling discussion or pre-judging a work of art, we only perpetuate the prejudice that does so much harm.”

The UN Israeli delegation is not the only group trying to stop this film, either, with involvement from such groups as the American Jewish Committee, who wrote a letter urging Deiss to cancel tonight’s screening of the film.

As a staff member in the Walker Film/Video department and a Jewish American myself, I can’t help but feel entangled in this debate. With renewed Israeli settlements in Palestinian territory, and increasing condemnation from the UN and the world, a film bringing attention to the issue is not the problem. The problem is the Israeli-Palestinian conflict itself. And the Israeli-Palestinian conflict cannot be cured by censoring discussion.

This controversy is reminiscent of another notoriously controversial film showing at the Walker next month. Negatives were almost burned and screenings were almost canceled because of the political content of this other film, but the director had this to say:

And, then, the mistake that Schafer made was not to believe me when I made the best showmanship suggestion I’ve ever made, which was that Citizen Kane should be run in tents all over America, advertised as “This is the film that we can’t run in your local movie house.” If we’d done that, we would have made $5 million with it.

—Orson Welles, This is Orson Welles, Harper Collins, 1992

 

For more information, see:

Interview with Julian Schnabel, BBC Article, Haaretz Article, LATimes Article, Guardian Article, Deadline Article, Jewish Telegraphic Agency Article, YNetNews Article, Jerusalem Post Article

 

Remembering Ousmane Sembene

At the Walker we are proud of the success of the recent film retrospective, Ousmane Sembene: African Stories, co-presented by the University of Minnesota’s Global Spotlight.  Not only did it bring out the Twin Cities’ film loving community in droves, but it sparked important discussions with the professors and authors who introduced the films.  This […]

At the Walker we are proud of the success of the recent film retrospective, Ousmane Sembene: African Stories, co-presented by the University of Minnesota’s Global Spotlight.  Not only did it bring out the Twin Cities’ film loving community in droves, but it sparked important discussions with the professors and authors who introduced the films.  This overwhelming success proved, once again, why the Twin Cities remain one of the most diverse and interesting places in the country.

Many of these discussions were recorded, and will be posted on the Walker Channel so you can relive the discussions you saw and catch up on the discussions you missed.

As a sort of a retrospective of the retrospective, we present an essay from a local film/video maker and producer.

ALESHIA MUELLER is the owner of Reel Nomad Productions and the President of Minnesota Women in Film and Television (MN WIFT). She works on long and short media projects that range from narrative films, commercials, podcasts, music and travel videos, and scientific, social, and historical documentaries, many of which have screened at festivals worldwide. Aleshia’s curiosity, fearlessness, and passion for her craft continue to take her on storytelling adventures throughout the world.

Inspiring Generations of African artists

How does a man who has seen colonialism oppress the voice of his people rise up to reclaim and redefine his culture’s stories? For Ousmane Sembene, a Senegalese high school drop out and manual laborer turned literary genius, it was through film. Using the moving image to reach a larger audience than his novels ever could, Sembene takes a stand against colonialism, racism, religious persecution, and traditional forms of authority. I had the honor of meeting Sembene at a forum on the Future of African Cinema at FESPACO 2005 and with the same energy as his earlier years, he continued to fight the odds to improve conditions for African filmmakers and inspire generations of African artists.

Francophone Africa has carried the torch of African cinema, but it isn’t always a pure African voice. Despite the freedom brought by Independence, many feel that African cinema is still trying to escape neocolonial rule as financing often comes from ex colonists. Hailed as the father of African cinema, Sembene was also seen as an artistic and cinematic revolutionary. He was a passionate anti-colonialist and injected true Senegalese culture and common routines into his films. Up until Mandabi in 1968, the mentality was that a film had to be made in French, but Sembene was committed to promoting his national language and culture. Drawing on his roots, he gathered lost voices and brought them back to life. He emphasized, “Art is political. Without art, there are no free men.”

Sembene’s films include part of his personal experience and philosophy. He believes that “ideas come by finding, by meeting, by listening to someone. You can make movies with just about any idea, but it’s how to elaborate and make a film coherent from beginning to end.” Sembene dedicated the second half of his life to producing movies that shared truths, exposed injustice, and imagined a better world.

The Walker Art Center series, Ousmane Sembene: African Stories, has presented us with scenarios that confront the racial and economic oppression of colonial regimes as well as the corrupt African bourgeoisie that followed. Sembene praises the strength of African women and stands up against traditional practices.

Queer Takes: Alt Families

In its fifth anniversary program, Queer Takes delves into the complexities of the topic of families within the LGBT community—those who have been rejected by their blood relatives and formed new families among tight kin they’ve chosen as well as those facing the challenge of obtaining legal and official recognition of their relationships.

In its fifth anniversary program, Queer Takes delves into the complexities of the topic of families within the LGBT community—those who have been rejected by their blood relatives and formed new families among tight kin they’ve chosen as well as those facing the challenge of obtaining legal and official recognition of their relationships.

Beautiful Darling: The Life and Times of Candy Darling, Andy Warhol Superstar

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0S_-ouXi3I[/youtube]

Edie and Thea: A Very Long Engagement

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lL83Yl4-9Vc[/youtube]

Going South (Plein Sud)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ms2aYFqnV_0[/youtube]

Re-envisioning a Community Treasure

Many of you are aware that Summer Music & Movies will be on hiatus this year. We understand and appreciate how beloved the series is by the Twin Cities community. Over the more than three decades we have offered this free series to the public, Summer Music & Movies has become part of the cultural […]

Many of you are aware that Summer Music & Movies will be on hiatus this year. We understand and appreciate how beloved the series is by the Twin Cities community. Over the more than three decades we have offered this free series to the public, Summer Music & Movies has become part of the cultural fabric of the city. We are aware of the special significance of the program to the civic life of the metro area and are extremely grateful to the community for embracing it all these years.
 
As a contemporary art center committed to bringing art, artists, and audiences together in innovative ways, we think it is critical to re-evaluate all of our programming from time to time and experiment with new ideas that inspire us as individuals, cultures, and communities. This summer the Walker plans a number of free events from June through August including Target Free Thursday Nights, Free First Saturdays, our new, summer-long outdoor initiative called Open Field, and, of course, our largest free attraction, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Throughout these programs you’ll find activities and amenities for all ages including an array of local bands, artist projects, and our new outdoor bar and grill.
 
Summer Music & Movies and other Walker programs—Rock the Garden, Momentum, and Choreographers’ Evening—have taken hiatuses in the past only to return reinvigorated and better than ever. We hope you’ll take part in the many free activities planned at the Walker all summer long as we re-envision how a popular program like Summer Music & Movies can be even better in the future.

La Jetée (The Jetty)

Pushing aside the thick black curtains to step into a small black box in the gallery is taking the first step into another world.  Chris Marker’s 1962 short piece is a film of photographs, a series of long still images, each occupying the frame for a long moment.  It’s as if stepping through the curtain […]

Pushing aside the thick black curtains to step into a small black box in the gallery is taking the first step into another world.  Chris Marker’s 1962 short piece is a film of photographs, a series of long still images, each occupying the frame for a long moment.  It’s as if stepping through the curtain time slowed—as if the film’s 24 frames per second sputtered nearly to a stop and what would be incomprehensibly fast became poetically slow.

The credits identify La Jetée not as a film, but as a photo-roman—literally a photo novel.  But yet what sets it apart from its cousins (graphic novels) is inherently filmic—it still controls the time it takes you.  The film determines how long you watch it, how long you hear its music, sound effects and narration.  There can be no flipping through the pages to see the end.  It is time based; its speed and structure are fixed and limiting.

And La Jetée deliberately exploits that limitation with its narrative.  Set in a post-war, radioactive Paris, we are forced to ask, how did we get here?  What could have happened to bring us to this point?  Is this a story of the future or of a possible future?  But, of course, we can never know until all of the images roll out in front of us, and we can remember it, like the film negative remembers the light that once struck it.

Installed as a part of Event Horizon, La Jetée will be running continuously in gallery 2 until Sunday, May 2nd.

60 Years of China on Film

As attested by the remarkably choreographed festivities at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Chinese know how to party—and nothing was spared for the recent celebration of the People’s Republic of China 60th Anniversary party on October 1, with special attention paid to showcasing military strength. This momentous occasion marks the longest Communist party rule in […]

Still from Good Cats, 2008

Still from Good Cats (Hao Mao), 2008

As attested by the remarkably choreographed festivities at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Chinese know how to party—and nothing was spared for the recent celebration of the People’s Republic of China 60th Anniversary party on October 1, with special attention paid to showcasing military strength. This momentous occasion marks the longest Communist party rule in history, and although the last 60 years have been met with much criticism and unease, and marked by intense economic, political, and cultural growing pains, China’s unique blend of communism and capitalism is undeniably large and here to stay. Chinese filmmakers (those both inside and outside of the border) are in a unique position to process and reflect their current cultural moment. Many different Chinese film programs around the world are running this fall to celebrate and recognize these filmmakers and this unique and important time in history, including our own film series, The People’s Republic of Cinema which runs November 4-23.

In the scheme of things, 60 years is a drop in the bucket for China’s immense history as one of the oldest civilizations on the planet, but the transformations the “New China” has undertaken are radical on a global scale. The process of modernizing an ancient culture coupled with an inflexible political climate, an environmental crisis, a growing consumerist culture, the tension between Eastern and Western values, a construction zone taking over every major city, and a new generation striving for individualism and creative freedom present enormous challenges.

I experienced this first hand in 2006 on a study trip through the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Spending time with Beijing and Shanghai art students, hip-hop artists, and filmmakers allowed a privileged glimpse into the tensions they experience and make work about. I met some boys in Shanghai who strongly identified with American hip-hop and had started a group that traveled throughout southern China and rapped in Mandarin, Japanese, and English. (Most of the music they knew about had come through Japan, as the Japanese have an easier time finding American music and have been interested in hip-hop culture and paraphernalia for quite some time now.) The 021Crew, as they call themselves, recognize the challenges referenced in hip-hop music (the struggle for self-expression, distrust of government transparency, freedom, individualism, social and class distinctions, and the tension between generations) as parallel to their own. A few of them had studied abroad in Toronto and London, and were presented with new visions of China then the ones they had grown up with. None of them knew about the Tiananmen Square incident in 1989 (it is impossible to find information about this when in China, as it is a restricted online search), nor did they feel comfortable discussing it in public. In fact, after learning about it, they said, “That’s not my China!” And although they felt extreme pride in their country, they longed to experience different freedoms they felt were denied them. Through hip-hop they are able to express themselves and their ideas in ways they couldn’t otherwise. To them, it is a platform of revolution, but the difference is the prescribed action. As language and the written word are the embodiments of knowledge and the foundation of Chinese culture (traditionally, at least), I wonder if in some strange way Chinese hip-hop is an attempt to be a contemporary equivalent.

My Chinese painting professor who led the trip had grown up in a much different China. In fact, as a young boy he had left school to become part of the Red Guard and march all over southern China with other boys his age. The changes he has seen in his lifetime, although subjective and unique, chart the transformations (I struggle to use the word progress) many have experienced on a large scale.

Here is a list of some other festivals celebrating and recognizing the “New China,” and although there probably won’t be fireworks or choreographed parades, I hope you can make it out.

The People’s Republic of Cinema

Walker Art Center

Minneapolis, MN

November 4-23, 2009

http://calendar.walkerart.org/canopy.wac?id=5308

China Independent Film Festival

RCM Museum of Modern Art

Nanjing, China

October 12-16, 2009

http://www.chinaiff.org/html/EN/

LENS ON CHINA

Portland Art Museum Northwest Film Center

Portland, Oregon

September 24-November 5, 2009

http://www.nwfilm.org/screenings/21/207/#1379

NYFF Masterworks: (Re)Inventing China
A New Cinema for a New Society, 1949 – 1966
Film Society of Lincoln Center

New York City

September 26 – October 6, 2009

http://filmlinc.com/nyff/china.html

China Classic Film Festival

Confucius Institute, University of Wales Lampeter

Wales

October 1-31, 2009

http://www.chinaclassicfestival.com/

2009 Tokyo China Film Festival

Tokyo International Film Festival

Tokyo

October 18-25, 2009

http://www.tiff-jp.net/en/lineup/title_24.html

New Zealand Chinese Film Festival

New Zealand’s Pacific Culture and Arts Exchange Center

New Zealand

October 15- November 8, 2009

http://www.nzcta.co.nz/events/

FILMING EAST FESTIVAL

British Academy of Film and Television Arts

UK

October 3-31, 2009

http://www.filmingeast.org/

www.bafta.org/whats-on/global-spotlight-china,828,BA.html

RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

UK-China Film Association (UCFA)

London

October 3-10, 2009

http://www.raindance.co.uk/site/index.php?aid=3797

VISIBLE SECRETS: HONG KONG’S WOMEN FILMMAKERS

Cornerhouse

Manchester, England

October 9 -November 3, 2009

www.cornerhouse.org/visiblesecrets

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Jesikah Ruehle bio:

+Loves being an intern in Film/Video at the Walker

+Graduated last year from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a BFA in Fiber and Material Studies and Film/Video

+Loves to ride her bike and experiment in the kitchen

+Is a hairstylist at FIVETWOSIX salon in St. Paul

+Some of her favorite filmmakers are Chris Marker, Shirin Neshat, Doug Aitken, and Stan Brakhage

+Is an escapist and consequently spends a lot of her free time looking up places to travel to

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