Blogs Crosscuts 8-Ball

8-Ball: Luther Price

Luther Price brings his gorgeous and tactile images to the Walker for a month-long program of his slides in the Lecture Room as well as a presentation of his 16mm and slide work on Friday night where he will be questions from the audience in a post-screening Q&A. Called “Brakhage after punk,” Price buries, burns, paints, dyes, […]

Luther Price brings his gorgeous and tactile images to the Walker for a month-long program of his slides in the Lecture Room as well as a presentation of his 16mm and slide work on Friday night where he will be questions from the audience in a post-screening Q&A. Called “Brakhage after punk,” Price buries, burns, paints, dyes, scatches, stains and gives much love to his slides and films that are as ephemeral as they are beautifully ageless. Price took a moment away from his studio work to answer questions that shed some light on the man behind the art.

Luther Price, Untitled #9, 2012 Courtesy Luther Price and Callicoon Fine Arts, NY

Luther Price, Untitled #9, 2012
Courtesy Luther Price and Callicoon Fine Arts, NY

What was the first concert you went to?

………QUEEN…….BOSTON GARDEN  1975….I WAS 13………..

What is your favorite candy?

……..I LIKE SALTY AND SWEET…….PAY DAY OR IS IT PLAY DAY….CANDY BAR………….

What is your spirit animal?

……………CAT……….WE GET ALONG………..THEY KNOW AND I KNOW ………….WE JUST KEEP IT THAT WAY……….

What global issue most excites or angers you?

………WELL THATS KIND OF TWO QUESTIONS………….’EXCITES’……….WE NEED HOPE……..REBIRTH………….WE ALL HAVE BEEN KILLING AND FUCKING EACH OTHER ………OVER AND OVER AND OVER……………BUT I THINK ,…..AS THE WORLD IS GETTING SMALLER WE REALIZE …………….WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING …………….WE CAN BE BETTER……………..CLEAN UP THIS MESS………….ON EARTH…………BUT I THINK , MORE THAN EVER ,….WE ARE READY TO TAKE STEPS IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION…………..ANGER…………YES………BUT WHAT GOOD IS IT………………SADNESS ….SORROW …………………WE ALL THAT THERE IS WAR AND STARVATION ………………….THAT OUR TIME MAY BE RUNNING OUT……………….BUT WE KEEP FUCKING AND KILLING ….KILLING AND FUCKING ………………PERHAPS WE ARE NOT CUT OUT TO BE THE GATE KEEPERS AFTER ALL……….

What is one of the most unexpected influences on your art?

……………PATIENCE……………….

If you could pose one question to every person on earth, what would it be?

…………..LETS START OVER……………..

What is your advice for young people today?

……………MAKE IT BETTER………..DON’T BE A TAKER…….BE A GIVER…………….

Whom would you like to spend three hours in an elevator with?

………………DAVID BOWIE…………….WE PROBABLY WOULD’NT EVAN TALK…………….JUST COUNTING SECONDS…………………

Who’s your favorite superhero?

…………..AQUA MAN…….I HAD A CRUSH ON HIM …………….HE WAS PRITTY HOT………………..

What is your least favorite sound?

………………..A BABY CRYING……………….

Luther Price’s program is on Friday, February 1 at 7:30 pm in the Walker’s Lecture Room. Bring the quiet babies.

8-Ball: Bill Morrison

Bill Morrison, experimental film director and miner of archival moving images, arrives Thursday for a three day, nine film program in the Walker Cinema as part of this year’s Expanding the Frame. Bill will be on hand at all screenings to discuss his work, but he was kind enough to answer a few questions that inquire just a […]

Bill Morrison, experimental film director and miner of archival moving images, arrives Thursday for a three day, nine film program in the Walker Cinema as part of this year’s Expanding the Frame. Bill will be on hand at all screenings to discuss his work, but he was kind enough to answer a few questions that inquire just a little bit beyond his professional life.

Bill Morrison

Describe a recent dream?

I realize this may sound like a fake dream, but I recently dreamt that I was standing amongst The Beatles as they were performing (which was awesome) but that they were all dwarves, or Little People (which was kind of weird). I think it was the only time I have ever dreamt about either the Beatles or Little People. It reminded me of that brilliant scene in Living in Oblivion where Peter Dinklage tells Steve Buscemi that the only place he’s ever seen a dwarf in a dream “is in stupid movies like this!” Now I’m remembering that the Beatles were briefly portrayed as dwarves in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There, which also could have been a dream sequence. OK, next question.

What is your favorite place in the world?

A small cottage in Riverhead, NY, overlooking the Long Island Sound.

If you were to die and come back as a person or thing, what would it be?

Oh a person, definitely.

What is your favorite comfort food?

Right now it’s Matzos Ball Soup.

What have you been listening to lately?

Today it was Wayne Shorter, Adam’s Apple. I never grow tired of that record.

Last month I listened to Brian Eno’s latest release, Lux, continuously for three days straight while recovering from surgery and deep in the throes of morphine. It held up.

What was the last film you saw?

I watched a few hours of Christian Marclay’s The Clock at MoMA – one of the great masterpieces of our time. An almost unbelievable achievement.

What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

I don’t know if this qualifies as a Minneapolis memory, but when I was 19 I started biking from Minneapolis to Chicago.  I got across the Mississippi, but then I found I had to start pedaling uphill for many miles. A pickup truck came along and gave me ride up out of the valley. Then I rode until it got dark and I found a bar to drink beer and eat burgers and watch basketball. Around closing time I asked if it would be OK if I crashed there and they gave me a room upstairs.

If you could travel back in time to any place, where and when would it be?

I would like to see America in the 15th century, before any Europeans arrived.

Black Elk spoke about the time when the two-leggeds and the four-leggeds ran together, which always struck me as a beautiful description of an entirely different way of relating to the world. If I had to choose a spot, I would start with the island of Manhattan.

Check out all of Bill Morrison’s film at the Walker: Short Works, Short Films and a Conversation, The Miners’ Hymns, Decasia: The State of Decay, and his newest The Great Flood.

8-Ball: Brent Green

In anticipation of his visit to the Walker February 26, filmmaker Brent Green was kind enough to answer some questions. 1) What first interested you about movies? Did you have an artistic bent as a child? Oh, I was a sports kid. I liked Ty Cobb. When I found out movies could be eloquent, mean, […]

Brent Green

In anticipation of his visit to the Walker February 26, filmmaker Brent Green was kind enough to answer some questions.

1) What first interested you about movies? Did you have an artistic bent as a child?

Oh, I was a sports kid. I liked Ty Cobb. When I found out movies could be eloquent, mean, and moving like Ty Cobb I joined in. As I get older, I like Yogi Berra type movies more and more.

2) What films impressed you as a child?

It’s A Wonderful Life is still my favorite film.

3) Your film, Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then, is a fascinating instance of art imitating life to some extent. How did you happen upon this enchanting tale?

Brendan Canty (who’s playing drums at the Walker performance, and is also the drummer for Fugazi) has a film series called Burn to Shine, where a bunch of bands from one town play one song each over the course of a day in a condemned house in that town. Someone called Brendan and said “we have a house for you in Louisville.” I went down there with the Burn to Shine crew and just stumbled into Leonard’s house—into this story.

4) When you first started making films, was there a certain director or artist whose work had a particular influence on you?

Kurt Vonnegut. He was perfect.

5) Considering this is your first feature-length film, did your approach or style change much as a result?

I had to think a little differently, I guess. My other films rant, which I like. I like to rant. I think in rants. There’s no way an audience would sit through a 75 minute assault of non-stop narration. Aside from trying to contain some kind of epiphanies and truths, I do want my films to entertain. Come to the Walker on February 26th. Let us entertain you.

6) Your studio is in rural Pennsylvania, far from the traditional film centers. What is it about this area that inspires you?

It’s beautiful and quiet. My closest neighbor owns over 200 guns. He keeps them in a shed with giant metal letters on the door—”NRA.” I have to make films that work for him, that work for Al. I have to keep him liking me. Feuds. Avoiding feuds is inspiring.

7) You once said that “the only stories that any of us relate to are the ones we see ourselves in.” Would you say, then, that the ultimate aim of an artist is to get inside your skin and reflect yourself back to you?

It’s tough to imagine a more complicated way of saying “be honest.” But, if you’re kind of clever and thoughtful enough, you can probably see yourself nearly anywhere. Empathy’s important in art and life.

8) Your film Paulina Hollers played at the Walker’s first Expanding the Frame series. What are you most looking forward to about your return to the Walker?

The weather. The weather and the traffic. Our van has heat—we’re gonna sit in the van, watch the weather, AND the traffic. I can’t wait.