Blogs Crosscuts Kathie Smith

Interview: Chris Sullivan on Michael Jordan, Jean Piaget, and The Sopranos

I met Chris Sullivan quite by accident at the 2012 Vancouver International Film Festival. My friend and I had settled in for a screening of Thomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt when the guy next to us struck up a conversation about the good crowd for the screening. He mentioned he was a filmmaker visiting with his […]

Chris Sullivan Coutesy Taylor Glascock

Chris Sullivan
Courtesy Taylor Glascock

I met Chris Sullivan quite by accident at the 2012 Vancouver International Film Festival. My friend and I had settled in for a screening of Thomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt when the guy next to us struck up a conversation about the good crowd for the screening. He mentioned he was a filmmaker visiting with his film, we asked which film? That film happen to be Consuming Spirits and the guy we coincidentally sat down next happened to be Chris Sullivan. The Walker had booked Chris’ film literally right before I had left for Vancouver, so I was thrilled with the lucky serendipity.

Three months later after this brief meeting and as the screenings for Consuming Spirits at the Walker quickly approached, I seized the opportunity to interview Chris about the film and his work for an article on the Walker site. Our conversation spiraled in many different and interesting directions, many of which I was unable to incorporate in the piece that I wrote. Read on for our full conversation where Chris compares Prairie Home Companion to The Sopranos, feels lucky that he didn’t make a film about Lady Di, and diviluges that David Bowie is on his short list for his next film, even if David doesn’t know it! (more…)

8-Ball: Luther Price

Luther Price brings his gorgeous and tactile images to the Walker for a month-long program of his slides in the Lecture Room as well as a presentation of his 16mm and slide work on Friday night where he will be questions from the audience in a post-screening Q&A. Called “Brakhage after punk,” Price buries, burns, paints, dyes, […]

Luther Price brings his gorgeous and tactile images to the Walker for a month-long program of his slides in the Lecture Room as well as a presentation of his 16mm and slide work on Friday night where he will be questions from the audience in a post-screening Q&A. Called “Brakhage after punk,” Price buries, burns, paints, dyes, scatches, stains and gives much love to his slides and films that are as ephemeral as they are beautifully ageless. Price took a moment away from his studio work to answer questions that shed some light on the man behind the art.

Luther Price, Untitled #9, 2012 Courtesy Luther Price and Callicoon Fine Arts, NY

Luther Price, Untitled #9, 2012
Courtesy Luther Price and Callicoon Fine Arts, NY

What was the first concert you went to?

………QUEEN…….BOSTON GARDEN  1975….I WAS 13………..

What is your favorite candy?

……..I LIKE SALTY AND SWEET…….PAY DAY OR IS IT PLAY DAY….CANDY BAR………….

What is your spirit animal?

……………CAT……….WE GET ALONG………..THEY KNOW AND I KNOW ………….WE JUST KEEP IT THAT WAY……….

What global issue most excites or angers you?

………WELL THATS KIND OF TWO QUESTIONS………….’EXCITES’……….WE NEED HOPE……..REBIRTH………….WE ALL HAVE BEEN KILLING AND FUCKING EACH OTHER ………OVER AND OVER AND OVER……………BUT I THINK ,…..AS THE WORLD IS GETTING SMALLER WE REALIZE …………….WE HAVE TO DO SOMETHING …………….WE CAN BE BETTER……………..CLEAN UP THIS MESS………….ON EARTH…………BUT I THINK , MORE THAN EVER ,….WE ARE READY TO TAKE STEPS IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION…………..ANGER…………YES………BUT WHAT GOOD IS IT………………SADNESS ….SORROW …………………WE ALL THAT THERE IS WAR AND STARVATION ………………….THAT OUR TIME MAY BE RUNNING OUT……………….BUT WE KEEP FUCKING AND KILLING ….KILLING AND FUCKING ………………PERHAPS WE ARE NOT CUT OUT TO BE THE GATE KEEPERS AFTER ALL……….

What is one of the most unexpected influences on your art?

……………PATIENCE……………….

If you could pose one question to every person on earth, what would it be?

…………..LETS START OVER……………..

What is your advice for young people today?

……………MAKE IT BETTER………..DON’T BE A TAKER…….BE A GIVER…………….

Whom would you like to spend three hours in an elevator with?

………………DAVID BOWIE…………….WE PROBABLY WOULD’NT EVAN TALK…………….JUST COUNTING SECONDS…………………

Who’s your favorite superhero?

…………..AQUA MAN…….I HAD A CRUSH ON HIM …………….HE WAS PRITTY HOT………………..

What is your least favorite sound?

………………..A BABY CRYING……………….

Luther Price’s program is on Friday, February 1 at 7:30 pm in the Walker’s Lecture Room. Bring the quiet babies.

8-Ball: Bill Morrison

Bill Morrison, experimental film director and miner of archival moving images, arrives Thursday for a three day, nine film program in the Walker Cinema as part of this year’s Expanding the Frame. Bill will be on hand at all screenings to discuss his work, but he was kind enough to answer a few questions that inquire just a […]

Bill Morrison, experimental film director and miner of archival moving images, arrives Thursday for a three day, nine film program in the Walker Cinema as part of this year’s Expanding the Frame. Bill will be on hand at all screenings to discuss his work, but he was kind enough to answer a few questions that inquire just a little bit beyond his professional life.

Bill Morrison

Describe a recent dream?

I realize this may sound like a fake dream, but I recently dreamt that I was standing amongst The Beatles as they were performing (which was awesome) but that they were all dwarves, or Little People (which was kind of weird). I think it was the only time I have ever dreamt about either the Beatles or Little People. It reminded me of that brilliant scene in Living in Oblivion where Peter Dinklage tells Steve Buscemi that the only place he’s ever seen a dwarf in a dream “is in stupid movies like this!” Now I’m remembering that the Beatles were briefly portrayed as dwarves in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There, which also could have been a dream sequence. OK, next question.

What is your favorite place in the world?

A small cottage in Riverhead, NY, overlooking the Long Island Sound.

If you were to die and come back as a person or thing, what would it be?

Oh a person, definitely.

What is your favorite comfort food?

Right now it’s Matzos Ball Soup.

What have you been listening to lately?

Today it was Wayne Shorter, Adam’s Apple. I never grow tired of that record.

Last month I listened to Brian Eno’s latest release, Lux, continuously for three days straight while recovering from surgery and deep in the throes of morphine. It held up.

What was the last film you saw?

I watched a few hours of Christian Marclay’s The Clock at MoMA – one of the great masterpieces of our time. An almost unbelievable achievement.

What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

I don’t know if this qualifies as a Minneapolis memory, but when I was 19 I started biking from Minneapolis to Chicago.  I got across the Mississippi, but then I found I had to start pedaling uphill for many miles. A pickup truck came along and gave me ride up out of the valley. Then I rode until it got dark and I found a bar to drink beer and eat burgers and watch basketball. Around closing time I asked if it would be OK if I crashed there and they gave me a room upstairs.

If you could travel back in time to any place, where and when would it be?

I would like to see America in the 15th century, before any Europeans arrived.

Black Elk spoke about the time when the two-leggeds and the four-leggeds ran together, which always struck me as a beautiful description of an entirely different way of relating to the world. If I had to choose a spot, I would start with the island of Manhattan.

Check out all of Bill Morrison’s film at the Walker: Short Works, Short Films and a Conversation, The Miners’ Hymns, Decasia: The State of Decay, and his newest The Great Flood.

Walker Staff Picks for Film 2012

The water cooler always buzzes with talk of movies, and it can reach a fever pitch in the Film/Video Department, occasionally roping in people from other departments. The lists below reflect the camaraderie, belligerence, and free-form sharing of these conversations as we digest the year in film each in our own special way. Courtney Sheehan Film/Video Intern […]

The water cooler always buzzes with talk of movies, and it can reach a fever pitch in the Film/Video Department, occasionally roping in people from other departments. The lists below reflect the camaraderie, belligerence, and free-form sharing of these conversations as we digest the year in film each in our own special way.

Jai Bhim Comrade, Anand Patwardhan, 2012

Jai Bhim Comrade, Anand Patwardhan, 2012.

Courtney Sheehan
Film/Video Intern

I spent July 2011-July 2012 traveling to twenty film festivals in India, Brazil, the Netherlands, Spain, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Macedonia on a research grant called the Watson Fellowship. For the most part, I stuck to lesser-known festivals in small cities and towns, which means that some of these films have yet to (and may not ever) make it to the U.S.  Because shorts get the shaft all too often, more than half of these titles run less than an hour in length. The final flair: this list consists solely of documentaries and animated films.

Jai Bhim Comrade by Anand Patwardhan, India
Mobitel: A Cell Phone Movie by Nedžad Begović, Bosnia-Herzegovina
Abendland by Nikolaus Geyrhalter, Austria
Mirage by Srđan Keča, UK/UAE
Sag Mir Wann… (Tell Me When…) by Steffen Köhn and Paola Calvo, Germany
Apour Ti Yapour. Na Jang Na Aman. Yeti Chu Talukpeth. (Between the Border and the Fence. On Edge of a Map.) by Ajay Raina, India
Empire of Dust by Bram van Paesschen, Belgium
Oedipus by Paul Driessen, the Netherlands/Canada
Villa Antropoff by Kaspar Jancis and Vladimir Leschiov, Estonia
Le Tazidermiste by Paulin Cointot, Dorianne Fibleuil, Antoine Robert, and Maud Sertour, France

 

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Behn Zeitlin, 2012. Courtesy Fox Searchlights Pictures.

Beasts of the Southern Wild, Behn Zeitlin, 2012

Jeremy Meckler
Film/Video Intern

This year was a powerful one for movies, with a few surprisingly high-quality summer blockbusters (The Avengers, The Dark Knight Rises, Cabin in the Woods, Premium Rush) some excellent independent documentaries (This is Not a Film, Jiro Dreams of Sushi, The Queen of Versailles) and some decent formulaic Oscar bait (Silver Linings Playbook, Argo). These are the movies, though, that were most impactful on me this year. While many other films may indeed have been more skillfully crafted, written, shot, and  performed, these are the ones I will remember. Full disclosure, I have yet to see Lincoln, Zero Dark Thirty, Amour, Tabu, or Something in the Air, and I suspect that at least one of them might have made this list otherwise. Also, I hated Cosmopolis.

10) Moonrise Kingdom
9) Margaret
8) The Master
7) Wreck-it-Ralph
6) Skyfall
5) The Turin Horse
4) Holy Motors
3) The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye
2) Django Unchained
1) Beasts of the Southern Wild

Ugetsu, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953

Ugetsu, Kenji Mizoguchi, 1953

Matt Levine
Film/Video Intern

My first choice is sort of an evasion: while it was actually made by Kenji Mizoguchi in 1953 and has long been one of my favorite movies, I saw it last year on 35mm for the first time at the Trylon, and it was like seeing it for the first time all over again. (I didn’t think it was possible for the ending to be any more devastating.) As for actual  2012 releases, a number of the most acclaimed films underwhelmed me a bit (Holy Motors, The Master, and the astonishingly bad Silver Linings Playbook especially), so here are the films that actually blew me away last year:

1. Ugetsu (Kenji Mizoguchi, Japan, 1953)
2. Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Turkey/Boznia and Herzegovina)
3. This is Not a Film (Jafar Panahi & Mojtaba Mirtahmasb, Iran)
4. The Deep Blue Sea (Terence Davies, USA/UK)
5. The Kid with a Bike (Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne, Belgium/France/Italy)
6. The Turin Horse (Bela Tarr, Hungary/France/Germany/Switzerland/USA)
7. Looper (Rian Johnson, USA)
8. Neighboring Sounds (Kleber Mendonça Filho, Brazil)
9. The Raid: Redemption (Gareth Evans, Indonesia/USA)
10. Take This Waltz (Sarah Polley, Canada/Spain/Japan)

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson, 2012

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Peter Jackson, 2012.

Emily Davis
Film/Video Bentson Researcher

Top 10 movies adapted from a novel, in no particular order. The task of coming up with a top 10 list for people like me who are not hardcore movie goers can be a lot of pressure and a bit overwhelming. So, I came up with the theme Top 10 movies adapted from a novel to narrow the selection.

The Hobbit
Cosmopolis
Anna Karenina
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
Wuthering Heights
Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Slayer
Life of Pi
Bless me Ultima
Lincoln
The Lorax

Cosmopolis, David Cronenberg, 2012.

Cosmopolis, David Cronenberg, 2012.

Kathie Smith
Film/Video Program Manager

Below are the top ten films I saw for the first time theatrically in 2012, regardless of release date or distribution status. In alphabetical order.

Cosmopolis (2012) David Cronenberg
Deep Blue Sea (2012) Terence Davies
Faust (2011) Aleksandr Sokurov
The Gang’s All Here (1943) Busby Berkeley
Leviathan (2012) Lucien Castaing-Taylor, Verena Paravel
Margaret (2011) Kenneth Lonergan
Napoleon (1927) Abel Gance
Neighboring Sounds (2012) Kleber Mendonça Filho
Tabu (2012) Miguel Gomes
Three Sisters (2012) Wang Bing

Zero Dark Thirty, Kathryn Bigelow, 2012.

Zero Dark Thirty, Kathryn Bigelow, 2012.

Gary White
Human Resources Director

Top ten films of 2012, in random order.

Zero Dark Thirty
Lincoln
Argo
Django Unchained
Silver Linings Playbook
Moonrise Kingdom
The Sessions
Les Mis
Hitchcock
Arbitrage

 

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, Alison Klayman, 2012.

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, Alison Klayman, 2012.

Jared Maire
Mailroom Specialist

2012 was a year for tears. It only makes sense that I list all the movies I cried at in 2012. Feel free to give me a hug or pat me on the back if you see me in the corridors of the Walker.

Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry @ Walker
The Avengers @ Southdale
The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye @ Walker
How to Survive a Plague @ Lagoon
Keep the Lights on @ Lagoon
Beasts of the Southern Wild @ Walker
Moonrise Kingdom @ Lagoon
Irwin Swirnoff’s short films @ Madame of the Arts

There were movies I didn’t actually cry at and really enjoyed, such as:
Beyond the Black Rainbow @ Trylon
Holy Motors @ the Edina

Introducing Crosscuts

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs, and with the release of our new homepage back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the opportunity to rebrand each of our core blogs, focus […]

It’s been seven years since we launched the Walker Blogs, and with the release of our new homepage back in December we thought it was finally time for a refresh. You’ll notice that the design has changed to align with our new website and we’ve used the opportunity to rebrand each of our core blogs, focus our offerings, and give readers a better sense of what they’ll find inside. Don’t worry though, the name might have changed, but this is still the blog of the Film/Video department, and we’re committed to bringing you the continuation and epic conclusion of Still Dots, as well as the random discoveries and thoughts on film from the Walker and beyond—crosscuts, if you will, in the world of moving images. Behold the blue and pink flag!

Walker Film/Video Weighs In: The Greatest Films of All Time

Sight and Sound Magazine unveiled the highly anticipated results of their ambitious survey of the Top 50 Greateat Films of All Time last week with much hubbub. What started in 1952, and has been published every ten years since, has built into a critical mass of film glory that’s hard not to revel in. Tallying 846 top ten lists from critics […]

Sight and Sound Magazine unveiled the highly anticipated results of their ambitious survey of the Top 50 Greateat Films of All Time last week with much hubbub. What started in 1952, and has been published every ten years since, has built into a critical mass of film glory that’s hard not to revel in. Tallying 846 top ten lists from critics worldwide representing votes for 2,045 different films, Sight and Sound’s poll is about as definitive as you are going to get in the feverishly opinionated arena of film criticism. The big news for the 2012 edition is that, after 50 years, Citizen Kane has been toppled from the number one spot by Alfred Hitchcock’s grand mystery wrapped up in the bun of Kim Novak’s hair, otherwise known as Vertigo.

With nary a fear a heights nor a newspaper mogul in sight, Walker Film/Video staff weighs in with their picks for the greatest films of all time: 

Dean Otto, Associate Curator

In the Mood for Love (2000) Wong Kar-Wai
The Marriage of Maria Braun (1979)  Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974) Rainer Werner Fassbinder
Imitation of Life (1959) Douglas Sirk
The Passion of Joan of Arc (1927) Carl Theodor Dreyer
Satyricon (1969) Federico Fellini
Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce 1080 Bruxelles (1975) Chantal Akerman
La Jetee (1962) Chris Marker
A Movie  (1958 ) Bruce Conner
Metropolis (1927) Fritz Lang

Emily Davis, Bentson Researcher

A Pitcher of Colored Light (2007) Robert Beavers
Observando el Cielo (2007) Jeanne Liotta
Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania (1971 -1972) Jonas Mekas
At Sea (2007) Peter Hutton
Ten Skies (2004) James Benning
Fog Line (1970) Larry Gottheim
A Movie (1958) Bruce Conner
Wavelength (1967) Michael Snow
Zorns Lemma (1970) Hollis Frampton
An Injury to One (2002) Travis Wilkerson

Jeremy Meckler, Intern

Pierrot Le Fou (1965) Jean Luc Godard
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) Woody Allen
Sans Soleil (1983) Chris Marker
Fitzcarraldo (1982) Werner Herzog
Last Year at Marienbad (1961) Allain Resnais
I Was Born But… (1932) Yasujiro Ozu
Blue Velvet (1986) David Lynch
The Third Man (1949) Carol Reed
Days of Heaven (1978) Terrence Malick
F for Fake (1973) Orson Welles

Matt Levine, Intern

Les Vampires (1915) Louis Feuillade
Strike (1925) Sergei Eisenstein
City Lights (1930) Charlie Chaplin
L’Atalante (1934) Jean Vigo
Late Spring (1949) Yasujiro Ozu
Ugetsu (1953) Kenji Mizoguchi
Andrei Rublev (1966) Andrei Tarkovsky
Mouchette (1967) Robert Bresson
Playtime (1967) Jacques Tati
Yi Yi (A One and a Two) (2000) Edward Yang

Kathie Smith, Program Manager

Branded to Kill (1967) Seijun Suzuki
A Brighter Summer Day (1991) Edward Yang
Floating Clouds (1955) Mikio Naruse
In the Mood For Love (2000) Wong Kar-wai
Late Spring (1949) Yasujiro Ozu
Life of Oharu (1953) Kenji Mizoguchi
Napoleon (1927) Abel Gance
Pierrot Le Fou (1965) Jean Luc Godard
San Soleil (1983) Chris Marker
Stalker (1975) Andrei Tarkovsky

MNTV 2012 Call For Entries!

Deadline for submission: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 It’s that time of year again! Curated by IFP MN and the Walker Art Center, MNTV showcases the finest films and videos produced in the state over the past two years. The showcase is a series of three one-hour broadcasts on TPT, featuring short films by Minnesota filmmakers […]

Deadline for submission: Wednesday, June 20, 2012

It’s that time of year again! Curated by IFP MN and the Walker Art Center, MNTV showcases the finest films and videos produced in the state over the past two years. The showcase is a series of three one-hour broadcasts on TPT, featuring short films by Minnesota filmmakers of all levels of filmmaking experience. Submit your films now! There is no cost to apply!

If your film is selected,

  • it will be broadcast on Twin Cities Public Television (TPT-TV) and streamed online;
  • it will be installed in the Best Buy Film/Video Bay at the Walker Art Center;
  • you’ll be paid $500 in licensing fees.

The series will be broadcast in December 2012.

THE RULES:

  • Works must have a running time of no longer than 30 minutes. There is no minimum length.
  • You must have completed the work after January 1, 2010.
  • You must have resided in the state of Minnesota at the time the submitted work was produced.
  • If you are a full-time student at the time of the submission deadline, you are not eligible to apply.
  • Current employees of IFP MN, Walker Art Center, and TPT are ineligible to apply.
  • A licensing fee of $500 for limited television broadcast will be paid to the winning filmmakers.

 

READY TO APPLY? HERE’S HOW!

  1. Complete this online form. You’ll need a 50-word synopsis of your film, a 50-word bio of yourself, and other information about your film. Click here to fill out the form.
  2. If you are submitting your film online, include the URL on the application form. You do not need to submit a DVD if your film is available online.
  3. You may submit one or two films for consideration. Please do not submit more than two. Complete a separate form for each submission.
  4. If you are submitting a DVD, please bring or mail it to the IFP office (address is below). Please label the DVD with your name, the name of the film, and your phone number.

 

MNTV – IFP Minnesota
2446 University Ave. West
St. Paul, MN 55114

 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2012.

THIS IS AN IN-OFFICE DEADLINE, NOT A POSTMARK DEADLINE.

Watch previous MNTV films HERE!

Check out last year’s program at the Walker HERE!

MNTV Calendar:

April 2012 Guidelines for 2012 program available online

June 20, 2012 Applications due

July 2012 Selections announced

December 2012 MNTV Broadcast on TPT

March–Aug 2013 MNTV at Walker Art Center

 

The Fine Print:

MNTV is a three-part series of short films made by Minnesota filmmakers and aired on Twin Cities Public Television. Walker Art Center Film and Video Department, IFP Minnesota, and TPT have teamed up to produce the 2011 MNTV season. The Jerome Foundation provides the funding for the program.

The goal of MNTV is to provide a television broadcast venue for short-form filmmakers and to nurture an audience for their work. The MNTV program often represents the first time local filmmakers are compensated financially for the projects they produce and direct. Licensing fees of $500 are paid to the filmmakers for the broadcasts on TPT.

Works must have a running time of no longer than 30 minutes. Artists must have created the work since January 1, 2010, and resided in the state of Minnesota at the time the submitted work was produced. A panel of judges from the partnering organizations will judge the submissions based on:

• Production quality and craft

• Originality

• Concept

• Diversity

• Suitability for television

• Ability of filmmakers to present their applications in an articulate and professional manner

Funding for MNTV is generously provided by the Jerome Foundation.

Scaffolds, Beasts, and a Very Grand Reopening

As the Walker Cinema stews in its top-to-bottom renovation, we wait patiently for the moment we can submerge ourselves in the forthcoming red trimmings and the best that analog and digital technologies can provide. That moment will come on June 22 with a very special pre-screening of Sundance darling Beasts of the Southern Wild. (Psssst! […]

As the Walker Cinema stews in its top-to-bottom renovation, we wait patiently for the moment we can submerge ourselves in the forthcoming red trimmings and the best that analog and digital technologies can provide. That moment will come on June 22 with a very special pre-screening of Sundance darling Beasts of the Southern Wild. (Psssst! Tickets are free while they last!) When that evening arrives, I will be sitting in the audience not only as a member of the Walker Film/Video Department, but also as a Twin Cities film fan eager to see what will probably be a landmark film for 2012.

I’m brazen enough to make such statements only after the recent issue of Film Comment landed on my doorstep yesterday with Quvenzhané Wallis, the young star of Beasts, on the cover and another stunning appraisal from frequent Walker guest Scott Foundas. For those who weren’t following the scent of Beasts left at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, critics flew to their note pads and laptops in praise of this unique film. Manhola Dargis called it the standout of the fest, but went on to proclaim it “among the best films to play the festival in two decades.”  In his article in Film Comment, Foundas reiterates the sentiment: “It was easily among the most audacious such debuts in the almost quarter-century since sex, lies, and videotape.”

Beasts of the Southern Wild, © Fox Searchlight

Those are strong words, especially considering what sex, lies did for the US indie film business, and what it did for putting the Sundance Film Festival on the map. I would argue that American independent film is currently undergoing a quiet revolution of the same magnitude that lies just below the radar with directors like Matthew Porterfield, Aaron Katz, Kelly Reichardt, Ramin Bahrani, and Sean Durkin. Perhaps Benh Zeitlin, and his new film that seems to be percolating for a summer explosion, will push this group, only loosely associated by budget and vision, into the mainstream discussion of important works that are made to do something much more profound than tally box office totals.

Zeitlin’s trials, inspirations, motivations, and philosophies—as outlined in the Film Comment interview and article—are as meritorious as you are going to find in any filmmaker. And part of Zeitlin’s vigor, no doubt translated in his film, can be atributed to his dedication to New Orleans and the area he now calls home. In speaking of New Orleans, he says: “This town is full of film at this point, but none of it is organic to the city. New Orleans pretty much expresses itself through music and parade culture, and I think it would be amazing if people were expressing themselves [that way] with the camera. No one would have ever seen anything like what would come out of this place if there was a real film culture.”

Foundas avoids delving into plot details and narrative surprises in his piece, but, be forewarned, the film’s trailer answers some of the questions about Beasts of the Southern Wild‘s magical plot, and arguably gives some of them away. Whether its a spoiler or not, I’m unconcerned and counting on the theatrical experience to reveal the alluded mythical power of this exciting new film.

Film Comment’s May/June issue is available now on newsstands, if those things still exists, or subscribe here. Beasts of the Southern Wild screens at the Walker on June 22, 7:30pm.

The Cannes Connection

The lineup for the 65th Festival de Cannes was announced last week with a number of names familiar to Walker Film/Video. As Curator Sheryl Mousley prepares for her annual trip to Cannes to forge new connections, we thought we would highlight Walker appearances and screenings connected to this exciting slate of directors and films. In […]


The lineup for the 65th Festival de Cannes was announced last week with a number of names familiar to Walker Film/Video. As Curator Sheryl Mousley prepares for her annual trip to Cannes to forge new connections, we thought we would highlight Walker appearances and screenings connected to this exciting slate of directors and films.

In Competition:
After The Battle (Baad el mawkeaa), directed by Yousry Nasrallah
March 23, 2006: Mercedes, introduced by director Yousry Nasrallah

Beyond the Hills, directed by Cristian Mungiu
January 30, 2008: Regional Premiere 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days, directed by Cristian Mungiu as part of Expanding the Frame.

Cosmopolis, directed by David Cronenberg
January 1992: David Cronenberg Retrospective

Holy Motors, directed by Leos Carax
June 2000: Léos Carax: L’amour Fou (Crazy Love) – A Regis Dialogue & Film Retrospective including the regional premiere of Pola X.

Like Someone in Love, directed by Abbas Kiarostami
February 1998: Abbas Kiarostami – A Regis Dialogue and Retrospective including the regional premiere of Taste of Cherry.

On the Road, directed by Walter Salles
October 1999: Cinema Novo and Beyond – Sixteen Brazilian films curated for the Walker by Walter Salles.

Post tenebras lux, directed by Carlos Reygadas
April 25, 2008: Regional Premiere Silent Light, introduced by Carlos Reygadas

Un Certain Regard:
White Elephant (Elefante Blanco), directed by Pablo Trapero
April 13, 2003: El Bonaerense, directed by Pablo Trapero, screened as part of the Hubert Bals Fund at 15: Making a Reel Difference program.

Beasts of the Southern Wild, directed by Benh Zeitlin
June 22, 2012: Regional Premiere Beasts of the Southern Wild re-opening the New Walker Cinema

Midnight Screenings:
Dario Argent’s Dracula, directed by Dario Argento
July 14, 2011: Trauma directed by Dario Argento, screened as part of the Location: MN program

Ai To Makoto, directed by Takashi Miike
June 2003: Retrospective Tokyo Underground: Takashi Miike’s Mad Bad World

Special Screenings:
Journal de France, directed by Claudine Nougaret, Raymond Depardon
June 6, 2002: Peasant Profiles: The Approach, directed by Raymond Depardon, screened as part of the Vignettes of Life program

Les Invisibles, directed by Sebastien Lifshitz
June 11, 2010: Going South, directed by Sebastien Lifshitz, screened as part of Queer Takes: Alt Families program

Mekong Hotel, directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul
November 2004: Apichatpong Weerasethakul: New Language from Thailand Regis Dialogue and Retrospective
June 2012: New work commissioned for the Walker Channel

Check out the full lineup for the 2012 Cannes Film Festival here.

From Berlin to Minneapolis: The Long Road of “The Turin Horse”

From the standpoint of a film enthusiast, the story of The Turin Horse, Béla Tarr’s fateful and fabled final film, began last year at the 61st Berlinale where the film premiered and won both the Silver Bear and FIPRESCI Prize. Critical praise poured over the film, as did the lament for a filmmaker putting a […]

From the standpoint of a film enthusiast, the story of The Turin Horse, Béla Tarr’s fateful and fabled final film, began last year at the 61st Berlinale where the film premiered and won both the Silver Bear and FIPRESCI Prize. Critical praise poured over the film, as did the lament for a filmmaker putting a self-imposed cap on his output. But behind the scenes in Berlin was a small but mighty Minneapolis delegation celebrating the road to Berlin and reminiscing the seeds of a production that leads somewhat inevitably to the Walker Art Center.

In 2007, the Walker invited Tarr for a Regis Dialogue and mounted a full retrospective of his films. From his early social satires to his more recent ethereal masterpieces, the monthlong, nine-film series made for an overwhelming and thrilling experience. At the forefront was an artist who personified a singular vision, exemplified by his one-hour made-for-TV version of Macbeth with only two shots and the seven-and-a-half hour tour de force Sátántangó.

The retrospective left a mark on Minneapolis resident and CEO of local production company Werc Werk Works Elizabeth Redleaf and then-president of production Christine Walker. With the experience of Tarr’s Regis Dialogue and Retrospective tucked in her back pocket, Redleaf, some months later, had the opportunity to meet Tarr, and the two agreed to a collaboration.

By then Tarr had admitted that his next film would be his last and all speculated that he would do everything in his power to film his truth to perfection. “When we got involved with The Turin Horse, we never expected that the film would have so many delays on account of casting, weather, etc.,” says Christine Walker. “Then again we never questioned that the film would be a masterpiece.”

A masterpiece, indeed. And one that exudes uncompromising creative freedom that few producers would take a chance on. But Redleaf has no regrets.

“Working with Bela—on his farewell to cinema, nonetheless—has been such a gratifying and unforgettable experience,” she says. “There’s absolutely no one like him. He pushes his vision to the extreme in this movie, and the result is stunningly beautiful and simply awe-inspiring.”

Like many cinephiles, I too lament that this match made in heaven is to be the last for Béla Tarr. A film to be experienced and endured, The Turin Horse is not to be missed and not to be forgotten.

The Turin Horse makes its premiere run this weekend at the Walker Cinema in the glory of 10 reels of black-and-white 35mm film.