Blogs Crosscuts Eliza Summerlin

Eliza is the film/video intern. She graduated from Macalester College in 2013 with a degree in Media and Cultural Studies.

The Mediatheque Expands

This past May, the Walker’s Moving Image department launched the Mediatheque, an interactive place to view films located in the former lecture room off the Bazinet Lobby. This innovative cinema provides visitors with the unique opportunity to control their own viewing experience. Visitors can add films to the queue as well as browse curated playlists […]

Jonas Mekas Notes for Jerome 1978

Jonas Mekas, Notes for Jerome, 1978

This past May, the Walker’s Moving Image department launched the Mediatheque, an interactive place to view films located in the former lecture room off the Bazinet Lobby. This innovative cinema provides visitors with the unique opportunity to control their own viewing experience. Visitors can add films to the queue as well as browse curated playlists (think, “Cinemas of Resistance” or “Bodies in Motion”). Nearly 80 films digitized from the Ruben Bentson Moving Image Collection populate the Mediatheque, including Soviet silent classics, European and American experimental shorts, and lyrical cinema. Filmmakers such as Maya Deren, Hans Richter, Bruce Baillie, Sergei Eisenstein, William Klein, and Yvonne Rainer are represented.

In late September of 2015, the Mediatheque will see another 76 films added to the selection. Prevalent in this addition are the Fluxus films of John Cale and Yoko Ono, Weimar-era German silent cinema, video art from Skip Blumberg, Leslie Thornton, and Nam June Paik, and early animation. Accompanying each film is a short description that provides background and context. Users can search the selection by genre, director, decade, and nationality and add or remove films from the queue at any time.

The Mediatheque acts as a resource for the casual museum-goer as well as the dedicated cinephile or film academic. When the Ruben/Bentson Moving Image Collection was created over 40 years ago, the curators intended the collection to reflect the history of cinema and trace the development of moving image mediums. The digitized versions presented in the Mediatheque honor and preserve a rich history of cinema at the Walker Art Center.

For more information about the Ruben/Bentson Moving Image Collection, watch this short documentary featuring previous curators of the Moving Image department.

To schedule a screening in the Mediatheque, please email movingimage@walkerart.org.

Filmmakers in Conversation: The Zellner Bros. on Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter

A grainy VHS of Fargo is the only solace for Kumiko, the newest protagonist from writing-directing-acting team the Zellner Bros. In a whimsical and bizarre exploration of humans’ preoccupation with fiction, Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter tells the story of a disillusioned woman who is so obsessed with a movie that she is convinced it contains […]

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A grainy VHS of Fargo is the only solace for Kumiko, the newest protagonist from writing-directing-acting team the Zellner Bros. In a whimsical and bizarre exploration of humans’ preoccupation with fiction, Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter tells the story of a disillusioned woman who is so obsessed with a movie that she is convinced it contains a treasure map. When her life reaches new levels of mundane, she leaves her home in Japan and hops on a plane to America to find the buried money. The Zellner Bros. shot their fifth feature onsite in both Tokyo and Minnesota, employing two different supporting casts and crews. Kumiko premiered at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

Joined by Variety Chief Film Critic Scott Foundas, David and Nathan Zellner visited the Walker in September of 2014 for the Walker’s Filmmakers in Conversation series. They discussed the origins of their film, casting choices, and comedic inspiration. You can watch the entire dialogue on the Walker Channel. For more on the blending of reality and fiction in Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter, read a recent New York Times article addressing the new possibilities of the imagination in the era of the moving image.

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter will be released in theaters across the country this month. The film opens at Landmark Theatres in the Twin Cities on March 27.

Walker Dialogues and Film Retrospectives: Crowd-sourced Cinema Line-up

This summer the Walker Film/Video department will celebrate 25 years of Dialogues and Retrospectives by hosting weekly screenings in the cinema. The crowd-sourced series will give audiences the opportunity to pick from some of the most influential and provocative films that played Walker Art Center over the past 25 years. From directors like the Coen […]

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This summer the Walker Film/Video department will celebrate 25 years of Dialogues and Retrospectives by hosting weekly screenings in the cinema. The crowd-sourced series will give audiences the opportunity to pick from some of the most influential and provocative films that played Walker Art Center over the past 25 years. From directors like the Coen Brothers, Ang Lee, and Agnès Varda, there is sure to be something for everyone. You may vote for as many films as you would like through April 15th and results will be updated automatically.

Check back here in April to see if your favorites made the final cut. Walker Dialogues and Film Retrospectives were launched with support from The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and sustained over the past 25 years with generous support from the Regis Foundation and Anita and Myron Kunin.

Filmmakers in Conversation: Ruben Östlund and Force Majeure

Swedish director Ruben Östlund visited Walker Art Center in January of 2015 for the Filmmakers in Conversation series to present his retrospective entitled In Case of No Emergency. One of Scandinavia’s most innovative directors, he tests his characters by placing them in tense social situations that examine human prejudice. His most recent film, Force Majeure, […]

Director Ruben Östlund during his January 2015 visit to Walker Art Center.

Director Ruben Östlund during his January 2015 visit to Walker Art Center

Swedish director Ruben Östlund visited Walker Art Center in January of 2015 for the Filmmakers in Conversation series to present his retrospective entitled In Case of No Emergency. One of Scandinavia’s most innovative directors, he tests his characters by placing them in tense social situations that examine human prejudice. His most recent film, Force Majeure, follows a Swedish family on vacation in the French Alps. When a controlled avalanche threatens to overtake them, the family dynamic is permanently shaken. Like his previous features Involuntary and Play (also included in the retrospective), Force Majeure encourages audiences to reexamine their own behaviors and values. In May of 2014, Östlund took his third trip to the Cannes Film Festival where Force Majeure won the Jury Prize. His next film, tentatively called The Square, examines societal trust in public spaces. In conjunction with the film, he is planning a gallery exhibition that puts visitors to the same test that his characters face.

After the Walker screening of Force Majeure, Östlund joined Dennis Lim, director of programming at the Film Society of Lincoln Center for a post-screening conversation that addressed the failure of the nuclear family, using close ups for the first time, and finding inspiration on YouTube. This conversation is now available on the Walker Channel.

 

Oscar-nominated Timbuktu screens at the Walker

“Passionate and visually beautiful … Timbuktu is a cry from the heart—with all the more moral authority for being expressed with such grace and such care.” —The Guardian (UK) Abderrahmane Sissako’s Oscar-nominated Timbuktu screens over two weekends (February 20-March 1, 2015) here in the Walker Cinema. Inspired by a real-life stoning of an unmarried Malian couple in 2012, […]

Still from Timbuktu.

“Passionate and visually beautiful … Timbuktu is a cry from the heart—with all the more moral authority for being expressed with such grace and such care.” —The Guardian (UK)

Abderrahmane Sissako’s Oscar-nominated Timbuktu screens over two weekends (February 20-March 1, 2015) here in the Walker Cinema. Inspired by a real-life stoning of an unmarried Malian couple in 2012, the film offers a harrowing portrayal of the Tuareg raid on Timbuktu. This Islamist group forcefully imposed Sharia law as part of their separatist agenda in the ongoing Malian civil war. Sissako’s film denies the obvious binary of good and evil, instead portraying the subtleties of the clash of the Arabic, French, and English speaking populations. Though his film centers around the story of a man condemned to death for accidentally killing a neighboring fisherman, Sissako offers a choral structure that gives voice to all different types of civilians living in Timbuktu. The film unfolds slowly and beautifully, treating each scene and character with empathy and hope.

In a special series of post-screening discussions, professors, local clergy, and prominent leaders from the Twin Cities African community will discuss the intersections of Sissako’s filmmaking and the conflict in Mali. For a complete list of screening dates and times, please click here.

Sissako will also travel to Minneapolis in early April for a retrospective of his earlier films, including Waiting for Happiness (Heremakono), Timbuktu, Life on Earth (La Vie Sur Terre) and Bamako. A post-screening discussion with the director will follow each screening.

Hi8: Eight Questions with Chris Mason Johnson and Chris Martin, Writer/Director/Producer of Test

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight […]

Still from  Test . Photo courtesy of Serious Productions.

Still from Test. Photo courtesy of Serious Productions

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight that best expose their current musings and fascinations. No two interviews are the same.

Nominated for the John Cassavetes award at the Film Independent Spirit Awards, Test documents the life of a modern dancer living in San Francisco in 1985 as he struggles to navigate his sexuality, masculinity, and career. The film’s writer, director, and producer Chris Mason Johnson, was a dancer himself as part of Frankfurt Ballet and White Oak Dance Project before pursuing a career in film. Test is the director’s second film and won two Grand Jury Awards at Out Festival in Los Angeles. Fellow producer Chris Martin is based in San Francisco where he has spent the last decade working in film, television, and journalism. He currently has two other films in the works. Both Chris’s took a moment to answer a few questions about novels, artistic influences, and recharging creatively. Test screened at the Walker at the end of January.

Chris Mason Johnson, Writer/Director/Producer

1. What was your worst (college/post-college/make-ends-meet) job?

An admin assistant to a choreographer. I’d been a professional dancer and suddenly I was this office boy faxing things while the dancers danced without me.

2. What is one of the most unexpected influences on your art?

My own past. I thought I was going to bury it but I put it on display.

3. If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be?

Physical thing: my jaw. It’s weak. Psychological thing: chronic procrastination.

4. How do you recharge creatively?

Pose questions to myself before I fall asleep and see if I have the answer when I wake up, or at least a feeling for them. Also: walking without technology.

5. Whom would you like to spend three hours in an elevator with?

A very talented and generous masseur.

6. What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

Buying a folk art wooden pig with wheels and surprising my boyfriend on his birthday at our hotel while on tour with the Frankfurt Ballet. He’d seen it earlier in a store and loved it. I snuck back and bought it for him.

7. What global issue most excites or angers you?

Excites: the spread of basic human rights to all corners of the globe. Angers: the treatment of women where those rights have yet to spread.

8. What is your advice for young people today?

  1. Your 20s matter. Be careful what you work at because it might stick.
  2. Money matters but not in the way you think it does.
  3. Learn how to listen. It’s not easy. 

Chris Martin, Producer

1. What have you been obsessing about lately?

Living in sunny and dry California, I’ve been obsessing about winter wonderlands lately, even watching cross-country ski tournaments in the Alps on ESPN just for the scenery.

2. What is something you have never done before?

I’ve never gone sailing on a craft of my own and I’ve never gone spelunking. I would love to do both.

3. What global issue most excites or angers you?

Building tract houses on the earth’s richest farmland.

4. How do you recharge creatively?

I read short stories or take my camera out to shoot landscapes that only I think are beautiful.

5. What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

Going swimming in the downtown YMCA with its big windows that overlook buildings.

6. What do you consider the most overrated virtue?

Abstinence.

7. What’s your favorite mode of transport?

Trains and bicycles – they work great together.

8. What have you been reading lately?

Billy Lynn’s Long Half-Time Walk and Station 11.

The Film Independent Spirit Award nominees screen annually at the Walker Art Center as part of a collaboration with IFP. Screenings are free for all IFP and Walker members. Click here for the complete list of screenings.

 

Hi8: Eight Questions with Ira Sachs, Director/Writer, Love Is Strange

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight […]

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight that best expose their current musings and fascinations. No two interviews are the same.

Jeffery Perkey, filmmaker Ira Sachs, and Dean Otto, program manager, Walker Film/Video

Jeffery Perkey, filmmaker Ira Sachs, and Dean Otto, program manager, Walker Film/Video

 Love is Strange, the second installment in an unofficial New York Trilogy, is nominated for four Independent Spirit Awards (Best Feature, Best Screenplay, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor). Director Ira Sachs and writer Mauricio Zacharias team up again to tell the story of two men—Ben and George—who finally get married in New York City after 39 years of partnership. Because of their recent marriage, George is fired from his teaching position at a Catholic school and the couple is forced to live separately while they figure out their finances. Sachs traveled to Minneapolis in January to introduce his film at Walker Art Center and participate in a post-screening discussion. His previous films have screened at Sundance, including Forty Shades of Blue that won the Grand Jury Prize. He is currently working on a new film with Zacharias called Thank You For Being Honest.

1. If you could throw a dinner party for anyone in the world, who would you invite?

My kids, Viva and Felix, and my husband Boris.  In fact, I’m going to invite them for that dinner tonight.

2. What is your hometown like?

Memphis is a city that if you happen to be born there poor you have as little opportunity for good education or good housing as if you were born poor in Calcutta. The American dream is not alive and well in Memphis, TN.

3. What’s your favorite place to people-watch?

The Great Hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  They have nice benches and in the winter, when it’s cold outside, there are few places better to while away the hours watching the world go by.

4. What is your greatest extravagance?

I would say going out to dinner more often than I might.  I don’t like fast cars, or fancy watches, but I do like sitting in a round, leather-seated booth at the Knickerbocker Bar & Grill on 9th St in NYC, and having a good meal and conversation.

5. What was your favorite birthday like?

I turned 40 on the tail of the hardest few years of my life so far, and I feel that I came alive again at a party hosted by friends for me on the top floor of the Pompidou Museum in Paris. That night, the past and the future didn’t look so bad.

6. What’s your favorite comfort food?

I eat gazpacho for lunch 4 or 5 days a week, six months a year (the warm months), so I guess that’s comfort.

7. What has been your favorite age so far? Why?

This moment now, without question. As I get older I find that I appreciate what I have more than what I want to have.

8. What recent album, film, or book did you consume recently that you wish you had created?

I have a bit of filmmakers envy for the work of the Chilean director Sebastián Silva (Crystal Fairy, Nasty Baby).  There’s an ease to his directing that I covet.

 

The Film Independent Spirit Award nominees screen annually at the Walker Art Center as part of a collaboration with IFP. Screenings are free for all IFP and Walker members. Click here for the complete list of screenings.

Hi8: Eight Questions with Justin Begnaud, Producer, A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight […]

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight that best expose their current musings and fascinations. No two interviews are the same.

Ana Lily Amirpour’s A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night. Photo courtesy Kino Lorber 2014

Ana Lily Amirpour’s A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night. Photo courtesy Kino Lorber 2014

A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night effortlessly blends genres. One part spaghetti Western, one part noir, and one part graphic novel, the film follows a skateboarding vampire as she strategically chooses her victims and falls in love. Director Ana Lily Amirpour’s debut is nominated for Best First Feature, Best Cinematography, and the Kiehl’s Someone to Watch award. The film’s producer, Justin Begnaud, took a moment to talk about Viking funerals and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off via email. Begnaud is the Chief Operating Officer at Crimson Forest Entertainment and has been producing film, television, and digital media for the past 15 years.

1.  What’s one of your guilty pleasures?

Oatmeal cookies with chocolate chips….hold on…I’m eating one right now.

2. What is your advice for young people today?

Get off your damn mobile device and live!

3. What’s your favorite place to people-watch?

Airplanes. Everyone looks miserable, and they all wear comfort clothes….which ain’t pretty either.

4. What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

My dad was born in St. Paul and my uncle bought a 60 year-old cannery on the outskirts of town… used it as his house… and he had 7 couches inside… one to sleep on for each night of the week!

5. What was your favorite birthday like?

My friends surprised me by re-creating the entire day from Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (rented a Ferrari, took me to a museum, a major league baseball game, and a fancy steak lunch… took me a while to figure it out, but once I caught on it was “so choice!”)

6. What’s your favorite comfort food?

Greasy Pizza! (From NYC of course).

7. What is your favorite place in the world?

South Island, New Zealand.

8. What do you wish to have done with your mortal remains?

I want a Viking funeral. Ya know, when they put you on a pile of logs, along with other flammable objects and get shoved out into the ocean abyss…then someone with a flaming arrow fires a shot toward my body. That’s honorable.

 

The Film Independent Spirit Award nominees screen annually at the Walker Art Center as part of a collaboration with IFP. Screenings are free for all IFP and Walker members. Click here for the complete list of screenings.

Hi8: Eight Questions with Lena Waithe, Producer, Dear White People

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for a Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight […]

Screen shot 2015-02-18 at 11.33.00 AM
Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for a Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight that best expose their current musings and fascinations. No two interviews are the same.

Dear White People seamlessly blends cultural critique and humor in its examination of racial politics in higher education. The film has a special relationship with Minnesota: it was shot on the University of Minnesota campus, screened to a sold out audience at the Walker in May of 2014 as part of the Next Look series, and was presented as a case study at IFP Minnesota’s 15th Annual Midwest Filmmaker’s Conference. Dear White People received two Film Independent Spirit Award nominations for Best First Feature and Best First Screenplay. Director Justin Simien and producers Lena Waithe, Angel Lopez, and Ann Le raised over $41,000 through Indiegogo, a crowd funding site. Producer Effie Brown later joined the mix after the promotional video went viral. Lena Waithe took a few moments to talk about self-care, what she’s listening to, and her favorite pair of pants. Waithe first gained internet fame for writing the YouTube series “Shit Black Girls Say.” She is currently writing a pilot for a show called Twenties, about a handful of twenty-somethings trying to navigate their post-college years, that will air on BET, and developing another show called Bros Before Hos—a comedy about three black brothers—for HBO.

1. What’s your favorite place to people-watch?

Gay clubs and holiday office parties.

 2. How do you recharge creatively?

Walking around my neighborhood listening to whatever my favorite song is at the time.

3. What is your favorite article of clothing?

A pair of corduroy harem pants I found at a thrift store. They’re way too big for me so I often wear them with suspenders.

 4. What is your favorite film scene?

It’s a scene from Eve’s Bayou. It’s when Eve’s aunt relives a memory when her lover shoots her husband in front of her. It’s shot beautifully and it’s done in such a sad yet eloquent way.

 5. What have you been listening to lately?

I’ve been listening to Siya’s latest mixtape “Better Late Than Never.” Oh and Jazmine Sullivan’s new album, “Reality Show”.

 6. What is your favorite inanimate object?

My remote control.

 7. What has been your favorite age so far? Why?

The one I am now (30) because I’ve learned the true meaning of self-care. It’s not a concept one can fully comprehend in your twenties. You’re still too eager to please everyone.

8. What recent album, film, or book did you consume recently that you wish you had created?

The Comeback—because it’s so smart and dark and a reflection of us as a society.

The Film Independent Spirit Award nominees screen annually at the Walker Art Center as part of a collaboration with IFP. Screenings are free for all IFP and Walker members. Click here for the complete list of screenings.

Hi8: Eight Questions with the Directors and Producers of Land Ho!

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, […]

Hi8 is a new series of short interviews that serve as a quick hello to film figures we’re following. Inspired by the Walker’s 8-Ball Q&As, the series launches with a look at writers, producers, directors, and actors nominated for an Film Independent Spirit Award. In a self-navigated format, each artist picks questions from a list, answering those eight that best expose their current musings and fascinations. No two interviews are the same.

landho

Land Ho! tells the story of two older men who, bored by retirement, decide to adventure through Iceland. The film received a nomination for a Film Independent Spirit Award in the John Cassavetes category for movies filmed with a budget of less than $500,000. Co-director Aaron Katz played an important role as a pioneer of “mumblecore”: an independent film genre that typically features a small budget, amateur actors, and emphasis on character rather than plot. His artistic partner, Martha Stephens, debuted as a director at the SXSW film festival in 2010 with Passenger Pigeons, a subtle film portraying life in her home of rural Appalachia. Katz and Stephens have been friends for over a decade and decided to shoot Land Ho! together while working on their own long-term projects. The film is produced by three women including Mynette Louie, president of Gamechanger Films, an equity fund that finances films directed by women. Louie won the Piaget Producer’s Award at last year’s Spirit Awards. Christina Jennings also helped produce the film and fell so in love with Iceland that she decided to move there post-shoot. Jennings first connected with director Stephens in Austin while attending school at the University of Texas. These four directors and producers took a moment to answer a few questions about dance hits, dinner parties, Ariana Grande, and the Australian Open. Land Ho! screens at the Walker at 6 pm on Wednesday, February 11, 2015.

 

Aaron Katz, Director

1. What have you been obsessing about lately?

El Dorado rum. On its own or in a rum Manhattan.

2. What’s your most vivid Minneapolis memory?

A long time ago some friends took me to a house party and someone put on “Gettin’ Jiggy Wit It.” I hadn’t thought of this song as enjoyable or good until that moment. I was at the peak of my just out of college music snobbery and I was reminded then that music can be enjoyed in lots of different ways.

 3. What is your least favorite sound? 

I’ve been watching the Australian Open and there’s this commercial that has run hundreds of times for Melbourne as a tourist destination. I remember to mute it most of the time now, but I’ll be hearing it in my nightmares for years to come.

 4. What global issue most excites or angers you?

I’m angered by the lack of seriousness regarding environmental issues in mainstream political dialogue.

 5. What have you been listening to lately? 

Dance hits by CeCe Peniston and Crystal Waters. Also, Korean hip hop geniuses Dynamic Duo.

 6. What recent album, film, or book did you consume recently that you wish you had created?

Nightcrawler. I caught the end credits of the movie recently while I was walking into a screening of a movie playing right after it and I was reminded, even just watching two minutes of credits, how great it is.

 7. What is your favorite article of clothing?

The Fair Isle sweater I bought while in the Shetland Islands with my wife.

 8. What have you been reading lately?

John Dickson Carr. He wrote “locked room mysteries” and I’m having a hard time reading anything else right now.


Martha Stephens, Director

 1. What is your hometown like?

I grew up in the Appalachian foothills right outside of Ashland, Kentucky. People call this area Cancer Valley. We have several coal processing plants, oil refineries, steel plants, etc. It’s a gritty, depressed hybrid of the rust belt and coal country.

2. What’s one of your guilty pleasures?

Mystic Pizza. But I feel no guilt for loving it. Julia Roberts in that pool hustling scene is GOLD.

3. What’s your favorite mode of transport?

Inclined planes and chairlifts.

4. What artist turned your world upside-down as a teenager?

Bruce Springsteen. At thirteen I heard Born To Run and was never the same.

5. Whom would you like to spend three hours in an elevator with?

See above. I’m getting flustered just thinking about it.

6. What have you been listening to lately? 

Suzi Quatro. She inspired the spirit of my latest script.

 7. What’s your favorite comfort food? 

Biscuits and gravy, the food of my people.

 8. What artists would you like to collaborate with?

I’d love to work with Billy Bob Thornton one day.  I think of him as a kindred spirit.


Mynette Louie, Producer

1. What’s one of your guilty pleasures?

ABC’s Scandal.

2. Who is your favorite villain of fiction?

Mrs. Danvers from Rebecca.

3. What is your advice for young people today?

This is advice for everyone, including myself: Don’t let the Internet rewire your brain more than it already has. Don’t fall prey to digital mob mentality or allow persecution by social media without asking rigorous questions. Cherish and nourish nuance and critical thinking. Learn grammar.

4. What do you consider the most overrated virtue?

Good manners and optimism (at the expense of truth and honesty).

5. What’s your favorite comfort food?

Mashed potatoes and soup dumplings (but not together).

6. Who’s your favorite cartoon character?

Lucy from Peanuts.

7. What is one of the most unexpected influences on your art?

Riding the NYC subway. It’s rife with humanity and ripe for existential musings.

8. Describe a recent dream in 15 words or less.

Hollywood agent disappears from office without a trace. Co-workers discover he went on a walkabout.


Christina Jennings, Producer

1. What’s one of your guilty pleasures?

Nada. I own my love of Ariana Grande.

2. If you could throw a dinner party for anyone in the world, who would you invite?

Rashida Jones, Cara Delevingne, the Broad City gals (Ilana Glazer & Abbi Jacobson), Emma Watson, Amanda Seyfried, Addie Bryant, Cobie Smulders, Anna Wintour, Tavi Gevinson, Drake and Paul Rudd.

3. What is your advice for young people today?

Don’t do something just because you think you’re supposed to do it. There are no “rules” in life.

4. Who’s your favorite superhero?

Joan Rivers.

5. If you own a pet, what kind and what characteristics do you share with it?

My cat Finn and I are both sweet-natured and gentle but we bite if we have no other choice.

6. What have you been reading lately?

Yes Please by Amy Poehler & Under the Glacier by Halldór Laxness

 7. Name something you would love to possess, but never will.

A neck tattoo. My mom made me vow I would never get one. I love her so I will obey.

 8. What do you wish to have done with your mortal remains?

I’m working towards my immortality so hopefully this need not worry me.

The Film Independent Spirit Award nominees screen annually at the Walker Art Center as part of a collaboration with IFP. Screenings are free for all IFP and Walker members. Click here for the complete list of screenings.

 

 

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