Blogs Field Guide

Laurie Van Wieren Returns with 100 Choreographers

Nivea Cream Piece First performer comes on stage with a bottle of Nivea Cream or (if none is available) with a bottle of hand cream labeled ‘Nivea Cream.’ He pours the cream onto his hands and massages them in front of the microphone. Other performers enter, one by one, and do the same thing. Then […]

Nivea Cream Piece

First performer comes on stage with a bottle of Nivea Cream or (if none is available) with a bottle of hand cream labeled ‘Nivea Cream.’ He pours the cream onto his hands and massages them in front of the microphone. Other performers enter, one by one, and do the same thing. Then they join together in front of the microphone to make a mass of massaging hands. They leave in the reverse of the order in which they entered, on a signal from the first performer.

–Alison Knowles, 1962

Variation on Nivea Cream Piece

Large quantities of Nivea Cream must be available, at least one large jar per person. The performers enter and each lathers up his arms and face, then his colleagues, in a fragrant pig-pile.

–Alison Knowles, Date Unknown

Laurie Van Wieren performs in Nivea Cream Piece by Alison Knowles. Performed February 14, 1993, during the In the Spirit of Fluxus opening.

Laurie Van Wieren performs in Nivea Cream Piece by Alison Knowles. Performed February 14, 1993, during the In the Spirit of Fluxus opening.

At the Walker’s 1993 opening for In the Spirit of Fluxus, Twin Cities choreographer and curator Laurie Van Wieren performed in Nivea Cream Piece, an event score by Fluxus pioneer Alison Knowles. When Van Wieren reminisces about the event, she’s quick to point out that she and her four cohorts rehearsed with precision, detail and a bit of caution, making sure they got the score’s directions just right. Their efforts were interrupted by Alison Knowles herself giving stern feedback that they were rehearsing it all wrong– they needed to lather up with force. Van Wieren recalls that the five performers were soon in an enthusiastic, vigorous and maybe slightly inappropriate “fragrant pig-pile”, just as the second score describes.

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Before the ‘fragrant pig-pile.” Laurie Van Wieren performs Variation on Nivea Cream Piece.

Laurie Van Wieren is known as a driving force in the Twin Cities dance scene. She creates idiosyncratic performance works, helps steer Dance MN (the Twin Cities’ dance newsletter and website), and founded 9×22 Dance/Lab as a space for choreographers both established and emerging to experiment with movement. But what’s less known about Van Wieren’s choreographic career is that it has strong roots at the Walker, where she worked from 1975-85. Though she was formally a guard, she often stationed at the front desk where she greeted everyone and secretly worked on grants: “I was lucky. I got to meet most every dance artist who came into town, and I saw everything. The first show I worked at night was Merce [Cunningham]. I was also awe-struck by Grand Union.”

Laurie Van Wieren rehearses at Open Field. Photo by Megan Mayer.

Laurie Van Wieren rehearses at Open Field. Photo by Megan Mayer.

At the same time Van Wieren, who formally trained at the Art Insitute of Chicago in visual and performance art, began studying dance and teaching improvisation. Many of her fellow guards (also artists) took her class. In 1981 they decided to audition Van Wieren’s work for Choreographer’s Evening at the Walker and the piece was accepted. The event changed how her work was perceived: “People have been calling me a choreographer ever since.”

Chris Holman rehearses 4x4 = 100 Dancing Outside. Photo by Laurie Van Wieren.

Chris Holman rehearses 4×4 = 100 Dancing Outside. Photo by Laurie Van Wieren.

Twenty-three years later, Laurie Van Wieren has curated the Walker’s Choreographer’s Evening twice and continued to share her performance work at the event. This Saturday she returns to the Walker with her newest piece, 4×4 = 100 Dancing Outside presented as part of Open Field. The work places one hundred choreographers within four- by- four foot squares where Van Wieren has instructed them to move in any way they like for intervals of ten, twenty, or thirty minutes. The piece explores Van Wieren’s dual role as choreographer and curator, providing a platform for local dance makers to present their work en masse: “I really like putting people together and seeing what happens. I want people to know how many choreographers there are in town. There are many more than 100—but 100 is a nice number to work with.” In a turn of serendipity, Alison Knowles also returns to the Walker with a performance score this week. She and her collaborator Joshua Selman will re-stage Proposition #2, Make a Salad Thursday evening at Open Field. If the event is anything like Van Wieren’s story of the Nivea Cream scores, we can expect a most exuberant salad-making experience.

The Evolution of a Salad

It’s been more than fifty years since Alison Knowles’ event score Proposition #2, Make a Salad premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London in 1962. This seemingly simple piece, which consists of amassing, washing, chopping, and tossing vegetables into a giant salad that gets served to the audience, has since been performed more than a […]

Nivea Cream Piece by Alison Knowles. Performed at the In the Spirit of Fluxus opening by L. Van Wieren, J. Anfinson, S. Shinazaki, B. Sobocinski and T. Carlsom. Alison Knowles dispensing Nivea cream. February 14, 1993.

Nivea Cream Piece by Alison Knowles. Performed February 14, 1993, during the In the Spirit of Fluxus opening by L. Van Wieren, J. Anfinson, S. Shinazaki, B. Sobocinski, and T. Carlsom. Alison Knowles dispensing Nivea cream. 

It’s been more than fifty years since Alison Knowles’ event score Proposition #2, Make a Salad premiered at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London in 1962. This seemingly simple piece, which consists of amassing, washing, chopping, and tossing vegetables into a giant salad that gets served to the audience, has since been performed more than a dozen times around the world, most recently at the High Line in New York in 2012. Knowles, who last made an appearance at the Walker in the early nineties for the exhibition In the Spirit of Fluxus—returns next week to re-stage Make a Salad on Open Field with her collaborator Joshua Selman. Other work by Knowles and her Fluxus peers is on view in the exhibition Art Expanded, 1958-1978.

Below is an excerpt from the oral history interview with Alison Knowles (Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution by Judith Olch Richards, , June 1-2, 2010), which sheds light on the evolution of this iconic salad.

MS. RICHARDS:  You had created a number of Fluxus event scores and I wanted to ask you about a few of them.  One of the early ones, 1962, was Make a Salad, which you’ve done subsequently. How did the idea for that piece come about?  Was that the first time that you were making something using food that people would eat?

MS. KNOWLES:  Well, I’ve become sort of known for the food art thing with the Identical Lunch [1969].

Alison Knowles, The Identical Lunch with Anne Brazean, 1971. Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Walker Special Purchase Fund, 1989

Alison Knowles, The Identical Lunch with Anne Brazean, 1971. Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Walker Special Purchase Fund, 1989

MS. RICHARDS:  Right, but that was a little bit afterward.  Make a Salad was earlier.

MS. KNOWLES:  The Make a Salad is earlier.  Actually I don’t call it a Fluxus event score.  I think my event scores, some of them, I mean, they were done during that time.

MS. RICHARDS:  Yes.

MS. KNOWLES:  It’s during the Fluxus time but often evades the, what I would call, a strict definition, if you even could do it for Fluxus.

But for me, they are event scores and they’re more based on the work of John Cage than they are on I think – or George Brecht, let’s say, than what became Fluxus performances that many people were doing and adding to.  So what’s meant by a Fluxus performance?  I really don’t know until you describe it to me.  But with the Make a Salad event score, you knew exactly what’s going to happen.

MS. RICHARDS:  So if you knew exactly what was going to happen, you’re making a distinction between that and something where you didn’t know what was going to happen.

MS. KNOWLES:  Well, between what you know is going to happen and things that happen from what you have done is what differentiates I think the event score from something like happenings where there was much more of an “anything goes attitude” and it was more important that certain people were there or that the site where it happened, like one of Kaprow’s happenings.

MS. RICHARDS:  Mm-hmm.

MS. KNOWLES:  When I say you know what’s going to happen in the event scores, for something like Shoes of Your Choice [1963], you’re going to have someone describing their shoes.

You’re not going to have someone telling a story about when they went to India and with Make a Salad you’re not going to have someone serving hors d’oeuvres.  So that’s what I mean by there’s a known quantity and then there’s all the things that happen around it.  But the salad might be made in Indonesia and you have to work with very different ingredients than you would in New York City.

Jackson Mac Low describes his shoes to the audience (Photo: Michael Lange, 1985)

Jackson Mac Low describes his shoes to the audience. Viking Ship Hall, Roskilde, Denmark, May 29, 1985. Photo: Michael Lange

MS. RICHARDS:  When you made that, did you think that it might turn out to be a piece that would be done again and again and that people would respond to it so?

MS. KNOWLES:  No, absolutely not.  I remember how the piece happened.  I was riding with Dick [Higgins] in a cab in London and a performance was going to be the next day and I think I was expected to come up with a lot of the pieces on the program.

It was one of those concerts where somehow just Dick and I were there along with Richard Hamilton in the audience.  George was not there.  George Brecht, George Maciunas was not there.  And it was the Museum of Contemporary Art.  So Dick said, “Well, you know, what are you doing to do?”

MS. RICHARDS:  The Institute of Contemporary Art?

MS. KNOWLES:  Is it called the institute?

MS. RICHARDS:  Yes.

MS. KNOWLES:  The Institute of Contemporary Art and they used to have – they had a very nice little audience room.  So it wasn’t a big hall.  It was a nice sized room and I had decided in the cab with him, I said, “What can I do?  Why don’t I do something with food?  Why don’t I make a salad?”

He said, “Fine, make a salad,” and that would always be Dick’s backup for an idea.  He would say, “Good, talk about your shoes,” or, “Fine, go take the train at 8:00 a.m.,” or you know, he just was very quick to back up a thought.  It’s almost like he wanted to be thinking about something else.

MS. RICHARDS:  But it served to validate your ideas.

MS. KNOWLES:  Yes, absolutely. I never remember him saying, “No, don’t do that.”  He just completely trusted what I would say for this occasion and there was no time to do anything but buy the vegetables in the morning.  That’s all the time there was.  And meanwhile, of course people were expecting some huge show or whatever.

MS. RICHARDS:  Well, when you approached that coming performance that you knew you would be doing, was it actually a very positive approach that you waited until the last minute, was that a usual approach?

MS. KNOWLES:  Usually we had no time.  We usually had just taken the train the day before from Nice.  We probably lost a passport.  I mean, absolutely a hair-raising tour, absolutely, across France, Germany, and you’d get somebody to pay your train fare and that’s about it.

MS. RICHARDS:  One might have taken all of these already created performances with you and not had to have created them at all at the spur of the moment.  So I’m just trying to imagine that maybe –

MS. KNOWLES:  Well, who would perform them?  You’d have to train a group or you’d have to write ahead what you were going – what people were going to do.

MS. RICHARDS:  I’m wondering whether it was in a way purposeful that they were made at the last minute because in fact it’s possible they could have – you could have come up with Make a Salad before you left New York.

MS. KNOWLES:  Oh, I see.  No, I think that the spontaneity of the imminent event was useful.

MS. RICHARDS:  It focused you.

Photo by Liz Ligon Courtesy of Friends of the High Line (2)

Make a Salad at the High Line, New York City, 2012. Photo: Liz Ligon, courtesy of Friends of the High Line

MS. KNOWLES:  Because probably back in New York I would have decided to do something more elaborate, or involve more people or – but I love Emmett Williams’ phrase.  “We have no time and we had to present a united front.”  In other words, within the group there were people who didn’t get along.

As human beings, they didn’t get along with this or that idea or this or that person.  But people always thought they were meeting this completely compatible group getting off a bus.  But by the time we got to present at the theater, we certainly had a pretty good idea what we were going to be doing.

We met the night before and put our ideas together and then often there was George Maciunas who would act as our director, whatever, and was very good as a, you know, what do you want to call it, the man who presents on a television show.

MS. RICHARDS:  Emcee?

MS. KNOWLES:  Yeah, he was a great emcee.  He looked strange.  He wore a monocle and full dress suit, black with a monocle and spoke with a decided accent.  He used more of an Eastern European accent.  When you consider that most of these are American artists exhausted, traveling around, you know, from place to place with Emmett who was a wonderful performer and brilliant and who was putting in a lot of very good pieces.

MS. RICHARDS:  Why were you doing all this touring in Europe?  Was it just a much more welcoming artistic scene that you couldn’t find in the U.S.?

MS. KNOWLES:  It didn’t exist here at all and even when we came back after the first Wiesbaden Museum presentation and then went through Europe, we came back to New York and we tried to put on an event on Canal Street in Dick Higgins’ space, his studio.  And I think he didn’t properly manage the promotion because George had always done that in Europe.  All we had to do was get there.

So here I think we all made a few phone calls but there couldn’t have been more than 20 people in the audience and not plausible – it was very haphazard.  We did a piece of mine called String Piece [1964] where I kind of tie up the audience and make chairs get tied to me and I get tied to the mike and it was kind of a nice web piece, which could be done when something else is being read.

So the Make a Salad was a totally amazing event.  He also did Shoes of Your Choice that night with Richard Hamilton’s performance.  Anyway, with Make a Salad, I got there and the little man in a red jacket who served the drinks, he said I couldn’t use any water because he needed the water to wash the glasses.

And I said, “But I have to wash a lot of lettuce.”  He said, “I’m sorry, I knew nothing of this,” and he began to raise his voice and my friend Robert Filliou was standing by the door.  And he walked in and this man had little red lapels on his little dinner jacket.

And he lifted this little guy by his lapels right up off the floor.  And he shook him and he said, “You give her whatever she wants,” put this guy down, completely turned him around and he left and I turned on the water ad washed everything.  I didn’t see him again.

Open Field: a glance at the week ahead

Open Field found a week of dry weather at last, just in time for us to contribute to breaking a world record, listen to Anonymous Choir croon Neil Young covers, and create a stop motion animation at the Animation Creation Station. Did you miss out on the fun? Don’t worry: here’s a look at what you can […]

Toussaint Morrison performs at last week's Acoustic Campfire. Photo by Ben McGinley.

Photo by Ben McGinley

Open Field found a week of dry weather at last, just in time for us to contribute to breaking a world record, listen to Anonymous Choir croon Neil Young covers, and create a stop motion animation at the Animation Creation Station. Did you miss out on the fun? Don’t worry: here’s a look at what you can find in the week ahead.

(Note: all activities take place outside unless otherwise indicated)

Thursday

Chops, Inc. Drum & Bugle Corps, Anatomy of a Drum & Bugle Corps, 6-8 PM 

Photo by Jessica Hoffman

Photo by Jessica Hoffman

Experience a behind-the-scenes and up-close view of a drum and bugle corps! Chops, Inc. invites you to observe, listen, dance, clap, enjoy, and otherwise soak in the entire experience of pulling together a drum and bugle corps performance. Help conduct or try an instrument; experience a marching band standing still! It might remind you of a parade– minus the politicians and princesses.

Dylan Hester’s Conservatory Listening Project, 6-8 PM

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Share in a curated soundscape experience in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s  Cowles Conservatory. Visitors are invited to stay as long as they please to soak up the sounds of contemporary drone and ambient music in a unique setting where sound and environment work hand-in-hand.  The experience might leave you feeling relaxed, meditative or creatively inspired.

Beatrix *Jar, 33 1/3 + 6 Toys, 5-8 PM (Perlman Gallery)

Local sound duo Beatrix*JAR invitse you to create a hands-on sonic dialogue with John Cage’s 33 1/3 in the exhibition Art Expanded, 1958–1978.

Acoustic Campfire: Michelle Kinney & Gary Waryan, 8 PM; Fort Wilson Riot, 9 PM

Our summertime Thursday night performances continue this week with sets from Michelle Kinney and Gary Wilson, and Fort Wilson Riot.

Photo by Ward Robinson

Photo by Ward Robinson

Gary Waryan and Michelle Kinney of Jelloslave have been forging paths through the worlds of classical music, rock/pop and improvisational new music, and music for theater and dance. On Thursday, we’ll get a peek into their work as a duo – from their exploration of their Western and Indian classical foundations, to their work in genre-blending and improvisational performance.

Fort Wilson Riot recently celebrated the release of their new album trllllun at the Triple Rock and are looking ahead to a slew of shows in the coming months. In their Campfire performance we will be treated to a more intimate show with just Amy Hager and Jacob Mullis, which will offer a unique experience of their sultry, electro-psychedelic sound.

Saturday

Free First Saturday Activities: Sonic Circus, 10 AM – 3 PM

Photo by Emily Floyd

Photo by Emily Floyd

As always, gallery admission is free on First Saturdays, with activities designed for kids ages 6-12 from 10 AM to 3 PM.

This month, Beatrix*JAR shares a curated a day of activities in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Activities include beatmaking, sound collage creation with vintage records and turntables, song-recognition quizzes, DIY wind harps, and a wind chime laboratory. Enjoy live performances by King Baron and Dreamland Faces. A full description of the day’s events can be found on the Walker Art Center website.

Gorilla Yogis present Yoga On the Field, class from 12:00 – 1:30 PM with picnic to follow (bring your own mat and water!)

Gorilla Yogis aim to make yoga accessible to all! Come experience yoga on an open field and explore the community and connection through breath and movement. This program is great for experienced practitioners and first time yogis alike, and offers a great excuse to play in the grass while exploring breath and movement.

Drawing Club is in Full Effect

Yes Yes Y’all. Drawing Club is indeed in full effect on Thursday nights this summer from 4-8pm right outside of the Vineland Place entrance. We will be inhabiting  the picnic tables (weather permitting). Come through and draw with us! There will be Fluxus drawing kits available for those who are interested in performing scores or guided […]

Yes Yes Y’all.

Drawing Club is indeed in full effect on Thursday nights this summer from 4-8pm right outside of the Vineland Place entrance. We will be inhabiting  the picnic tables (weather permitting). Come through and draw with us! There will be Fluxus drawing kits available for those who are interested in performing scores or guided drawing.

This year we are exploring different approaches to tracing and collaborative drawing. Check out the giant collaborative drawing we did at the bottom of this post! Drawing with strangers is so much fun.

When’s the last time you played exquisite corpse?

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When Life Gives You Lemons, Play Ball

A dugout conversation, a rented organ, a baseball game, and 90 lemons: sound artist Chris Kallmyer visited the Walker Art Center in June to make a plan for his July residency on Open Field. Earlier this month Chris Kallmyer met with two Minneapolis experts to map out his project, Baseball Day to Day, a sonic exploration of […]

of2014baseball-days-marketing_003A dugout conversation, a rented organ, a baseball game, and 90 lemons: sound artist Chris Kallmyer visited the Walker Art Center in June to make a plan for his July residency on Open Field.

Earlier this month Chris Kallmyer met with two Minneapolis experts to map out his project, Baseball Day to Day, a sonic exploration of baseball in the spirit of Fluxus. You may recall Kallmyer’s 2011 Open Field piece, the american lawn and ways to cut it, in which he invited members of the public to bring their reel lawnmowers to cut the shaggy field in concert. This year the everyday sounds of Americana take a sporty slant.

Chris Kallmyer and Larry DiVito discuss groundskeeping.

Chris Kallmyer and Larry DiVito discuss groundskeeping.

Field Day

On a baseball fact-finding mission Chris Kallmyer, Sarah Schultz and I had the pleasure of meeting with the Minnesota Twins’ Head Groundskeeper, Larry DiVito, to ask his counsel in the matter of building a regulation pitcher’s mound on Open Field. We met in his office, a dugout overlooking Target Field, with his crew dutifully grooming the pristine paradise beyond. DiVito is a baseball Zen master of sorts. He is kind, generous with his knowledge, and seems entirely at peace in the literal landscape of his making. In the end, plans were modified in scope to build a functioning baseline instead of a pitcher’s mound, but what we learned in that meeting has forever changed the way I think about baseball. I can’t share all of the details here but I will say that it involved lasers. The 40-foot baseline will be built on Open Field as part of the project Live Action Groundskeeping and will be mindfully tended to by Kallmyer and open for public play from July 9-17.

Target Field Mower

View of field maintenance from the bullpen at Target Field.

Larry DiVito showing Sarah Schultz pitcher's mound clay.

Larry DiVito shows Sarah Schultz the pitcher’s mound clay.

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Find it at Open Field: Painting with Our Feet

Introducing:  Alison Anderson Holland‘s Painting with Our Feet People of all ages are invited to paint with their feet while moving and/or dancing across a large piece of fabric. We’ll experiment with a range of strategies for creating foot painted artwork that includes everything from a movement free-for-all to a game of “Simon Says”. Play for […]

PaintingWithOurFeet

Introducing:  Alison Anderson Holland‘s Painting with Our Feet

People of all ages are invited to paint with their feet while moving and/or dancing across a large piece of fabric. We’ll experiment with a range of strategies for creating foot painted artwork that includes everything from a movement free-for-all to a game of “Simon Says”. Play for a few minutes, or stay for the whole afternoon.

Come from an interest in: using dance to connect people to one another and their community spaces. I want participants to feel playful, connected to one another, and validated by their contribution to the collaborative artwork.

Feels: playful, inviting, and probably a little silly

Might remind you of: finger painting, but on a much larger scale and done collaboratively.

Might be a good fit if you’re looking for: a fun, easy and creative activity appropriate for all ages– from toddlers to grandparents; a way to get out of the house for a while to play, while leaving the mess behind!  We’ll have water to clean off paint. Come with a group or on your own.

Find Alison: on twitter @andersonholland or at alisonandersonholland.com

Find Painting with Our Feet at Open Field Saturday, June 26 from 12-3 PM

Thursday at Acoustic Campfire: Toussaint Morrison & Anonymous Choir

Introducing: Toussaint Morrison (vocals), joined by Linden Killam (keys), Jesse Mattila (drums), Matt Brandes (guitar) and Josh Ackerley (bass) Toussaint Morrison is a hip-hop artist specializing in confrontation and soul singing too loud in the shower. His past mixtape charted #17 on the CMJ national hip-hop charts for 2013, as his new mixtape debuts this […]

ToussaintMorrison3

Introducing: Toussaint Morrison (vocals), joined by Linden Killam (keys), Jesse Mattila (drums), Matt Brandes (guitar) and Josh Ackerley (bass)

Toussaint Morrison is a hip-hop artist specializing in confrontation and soul singing too loud in the shower. His past mixtape charted #17 on the CMJ national hip-hop charts for 2013, as his new mixtape debuts this week.

Sounds like: Ice Cube and Aerosmith in a bar fight

Expect: music filling an awkward Minnesotan silence

Good if you’re in the mood for: dancing or reckless abandon

In awe of: Minnesota-based poet Bao Phi. I can credit him for lighting my creative fire when I was young wandering writer in high school.

AnonymousChoir

Introducing: Anonymous Choir– 12 women, one piano

Anonymous Choir sings your favorite songs.

Sounds like: siren songs

Expect: a sun-kissed serenade

Good if you’re in the mood for: a night of sweetness

Inspired by: swimming at cedar lake!

Find Toussaint Morrison & Anonymous Choir at Acoustic Campfire Thursday, June 26 from 8-10 PM

Find it at Open Field: Recess Games with Grown-up Club

Introducing: Taylor Baldry’s  Recess Games with Grown-up Club  Join Grown-up Club in reliving your glory days through recess-style games, such as Kick the Can and Capture the Flag. Meet on the grassy knoll and get ready for an evening of dodging, capturing, and sweatbanding.  Aims to: take you back to the springtime of your youth. This […]

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Introducing: Taylor Baldry’s  Recess Games with Grown-up Club 

Join Grown-up Club in reliving your glory days through recess-style games, such as Kick the Can and Capture the Flag. Meet on the grassy knoll and get ready for an evening of dodging, capturing, and sweatbanding. 

Aims to: take you back to the springtime of your youth. This event is presented by Grown-up Club, which works to connect and empower wayward adults through a diverse monthly event series.

Looks like: a group of plucky adolescents trapped in less-spry adult bodies running around the grounds of the Walker.

Will remind you of: a simpler time. A time when anything was possible. Also, it will rekindle your love of classic schoolyard games.

Useful if: you want a greater sense of belonging; if you experience shame about not fully enjoying the summer;  if you enjoy lightly-competitive outdoor physical activities and sweatbands; if you like free events!

Find Recess Games at Open Field Thursdays, June 26 & July 31 from 6-8 PM

Golden Kitty 2014: Cast Your Vote for the #catvidfest People’s Choice Award

jedi-kittens-strike-back

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It’s time to cast your vote in the most important People’s Choice competition of the entire year. The coveted Golden Kitty Award for the internet’s best cat video is now on the line. You may know its short but storied history: During the first Internet Cat Video Festival, Will Braden’s Henri 2: Paw de Deux took home the Golden Kitty statuette. Last year, Grumpy Cat was awarded the top prize for her work in The Original Grumpy Cat. (FYI: We talked to Braden about winning the award and the process of choosing the nominees in this recent interview.)

Who will it be this year? After a year of watching hundreds of cat videos, reviewing your nominations, and considering the invaluable feedback of our panel of jurors, we present the five nominees for the 2014 Internet Cat Video Festival People’s Choice Award (in alphabetical order):

8 Signs of Addiction by Sho Ko

An Engineer’s Guide to Cats 2.0 – The Sequel by klusmanp

Gotcha! (Попался!) by ignoramusky

Jedi Kittens Strike Back by FinalCutKing

Milo Wanted Attention by jahzyoga

How to vote: There are two ways to vote for your choice for the Golden Kitty. You can either vote in the poll below OR you can vote on Twitter!

Follow @CatVidFest and use hashtag #goldenkittyaward, plus the name of the video to cast your vote! Try it!

Example: I vote for Henri 2: Paw de Deux #goldenkittyaward #catvidfest
(Obviously, Henri is not up for the award again this year.)

Voting closes on July 18 at midnight. The winners will be revealed at the 2014 Internet Cat Video Festival on Thursday, August 14.  And remember, just because you may not see your favorite video on this list, doesn’t mean that it’s not in the reel or we don’t have something special planned for it.

Until then, watch, deliberate, and vote!

Find it at Open Field: Cursive Writing for the Contemporary Artist

Introducing: By Heart: Cursive Writing for the Contemporary Artist, a program by Alyssa Baguss and Jenni Undis Practice makes perfect!  Brush up on your cursive writing and contemporary art terms this summer at Open Field. With a little repetition of standardized penmanship you’ll be on your way to knowing art speak By Heart. Because: Jenni’s the […]

By Heart 01

Introducing: By Heart: Cursive Writing for the Contemporary Artist, a program by Alyssa Baguss and Jenni Undis

Practice makes perfect!  Brush up on your cursive writing and contemporary art terms this summer at Open Field. With a little repetition of standardized penmanship you’ll be on your way to knowing art speak By Heart.

Because: Jenni’s the queen of proper penmanship and letter writing while Alyssa enjoys mocking educational methods favoring repetition and formula over deep understanding.  Cursive writing practice of art vocabulary words seemed like the perfect way to bring the public and contemporary art together at Open Field.

Looks like: light-hearted outdoor fun!  Grab a seat at the picnic table, choose a writing utensil and practice your penmanship.  Expect cursive writing demos, gold star stickers and entertaining worksheets you’ll definitely want to display on your refrigerator.

Might remind you of:  Mrs. Suther’s 3rd grade classroom; Artist statements

Helpful for gaining: a better understanding of the art world.  Your friends will be jealous of your amazing cursive writing skills and expanded vocabulary.

Find By Heart: Cursive Writing for the Contemporary Artist at Open Field this Thursday, June 26 from 6-8 PM

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