Blogs Field Guide Teen Programs

Youth Educators Event @ The Walker 4/11 6-8pm

CALLING ALL YOUTH EDUCATORS !!!  Thursday, April  11th from 6-8 pm @ The Walker Art Center in the Art Lab Join us for a fun evening, learn about Teen Programs at the Walker and how you can connect! This event is geared towards those who work with and teach youth, but all educators are welcome. Please RSVP to mischa.kegan@walkerart.org and […]

CALLING ALL YOUTH EDUCATORS !!! 

Thursday, April  11th from 6-8 pm

@ The Walker Art Center in the Art Lab

Join us for a fun evening, learn about Teen Programs at the Walker and how you can connect! This event is geared towards those who work with and teach youth, but all educators are welcome.

Please RSVP to mischa.kegan@walkerart.org and do come! Also, please inform your staff/ colleagues of this event.

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Photo taken and the March Teen Art Lounge with artist Abraham Cruzvillegas.

Teen Art Council

The Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC) is a group of 12 students who work with the Walker to produce programs that connect teenagers to contemporary art and artists. Past projects have included teen art exhibitions, performances, film screenings, artist talks, workshops, events, and marketing materials. Click here to check out last years Student Open House.

Walker Teen Website

A place to promote  youth voices and ideas.  This platform allows teens to discuss and think about contemporary art and the ideas that are connected to it. Check out the website here!

Teen Art Lounge

Teen Art Lounge is a monthly night for young people to hang out, make art, meet artists, and learn new techniques and processes with other teens at the Walker. Intended for ages 13 to 18, activities are drop-in and occur every third Thursday of the month. For details, click here.

Scheduling a Guided Tour or Self-Guided Visit:

Tours are interactive – guides foster conversations through open-ended questions and guided looking. For all the details on tours and self-guided visits click here.

 Online Learning Opportunities:

Visit ArtsConnectEd, a great online learning tool featuring works from the collections of the Walker Art Center and Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

TEENS GET INTO THE WALKER FOR FREE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Kids Are All Right

Since 1993, the Walker has been offering programs specifically for teenagers. Throughout it’s 17 year history over 100 high school students have participated in it’s core program – the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC), an advisory group that partners with the Walker to create workshops, events, and interactions for teenagers. As a staff […]

Since 1993, the Walker has been offering programs specifically for teenagers. Throughout it’s 17 year history over 100 high school students have participated in it’s core program – the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC), an advisory group that partners with the Walker to create workshops, events, and interactions for teenagers.

As a staff member for over a decade, I had the opportunity to develop long term relationships with WACTAC members. One of the most rewarding parts of my job was witnessing participants develop socially, academically, and professionally.  Over the years I had kept tabs of alumni anecdotally, but I didn’t have a formal way of tracking the participants. Several years back we decided to make a concerted effort to get the alumni together annually.

Free food and drinks are always a good way to get people to show up, so every year around the holidays “Uncle” Walker organizes a WACTAC Alumni Gathering. The event is an opportunity for past participants to reconnect with one another and staff. This year’s event was held at Common Roots Cafe and brought together over 30 participants spanning both Generations X and Y, ranging in age from 18 – 31. Participants exchanged memories of WACTAC romances gone sour, Don’t Sleep On It (a raucous 24 hour art event), and epic rubberband fights in the Teen Programs office. Although their careers vary widely (from Student to Electrician), the majority of participants continue to be actively involved in the arts as creators and/or audience members.

I realize that most educators and youth workers don’t get the see how their work effected others 10 years down the road, so I feel extremely fortunate to have a yearly opportunity to catch up with past WACTAC participants. In the end the party was a great success and I’m looking forward to next year’s gathering.

[tylr-slidr userID=”” groupID=””]http://www.flickr.com/photos/wactac/sets/72157625602555281/show/[/tylr-slidr]

The Listening Tent debut

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Since December I have been fortunate to be an artist in residence with the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC). The final result of our time together is called The Listening Tent, a 4’ wide by 7’ long tent. The tent is constructed from thrift store blankets (washed!) and a wood frame. It was […]

Since December I have been fortunate to be an artist in residence with the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC). The final result of our time together is called The Listening Tent, a 4’ wide by 7’ long tent. The tent is constructed from thrift store blankets (washed!) and a wood frame. It was inspired by our visit to the world’s quietest place (located here in South Minneapolis!).

the tent finished!

It also came as a response to Open Exposure, the music event WACTAC is presenting currently with a culmination on July 11. We were thinking about what we could do that would be using the basic element of music; sound. Although a concert is all about listening, it is a rather proscribed activity–look at the band and listen. I was curious to see how muffling and disconnecting sound from visual cues would work in the environment of a music performance. One also enters the tent alone, something else that is a seeming contradiction at a music show. The Listening Tent is a dark, quiet space to enter with this prompt,

Use this tent for a moment of solitude while listening to what is around you and what is in your head.

We set it up at The Beat Coffee Shop on Thursday evening for its public debut at the first of the music showcases.

Outside The Beat

Four bands were in the line-up, Diving for Illusions ,Cat & Fox, Wolf Mountain and Howler. I was mostly hanging out in front of the coffee shop where we had the tent set up and guarding the burritos. We had some visitors to the tent however, teen and otherwise. One coffee shop patron said something about how “people are always telling me I have to listen more” and tried out the tent for 5 or so minutes, one of our longer visitors. Some other comments related to the feeling of motion while in the tent, like a boat, something I also experienced. Sound is heard through the tent but one user described it eloquently this way,

“Things were brought down to a loud murmur. The roughness of the street was softened and idle chatter was akin to your neighbors in an apartment with thin walls”

There was also a sense that time was differently experienced, “I forgot where I was for a minute. I felt like I could walk out of it and end up in Narnia. Also, I kept thinking about disasters (I’m claustrophobic).”

Finally, unless you can  make a true, portable anechoic chamber, “Motorcycles are loud. Even when you’re in a tent.”

Looking forward to The Listening Tent being used tonight at the Depot and on Sunday at Eclipse Records.

A satisfied customer

Pirate Press Zine Workshop

This month Teen Programs is hosting a zine workshop taught by graphic designer Alex DeArmond. We started off the class by meeting librarian Rosemary Furtak in Walker Library and checked out zines and artist books by Raymond Pettibon, Ed Ruscha, Sara Varon and many others. [tylr-slidr userID=”36154778@N00″ groupID=””]http://www.flickr.com/photos/wactac/sets/72157623672605311/show/[/tylr-slidr] After the library, we played around with […]

This month Teen Programs is hosting a zine workshop taught by graphic designer Alex DeArmond. We started off the class by meeting librarian Rosemary Furtak in Walker Library and checked out zines and artist books by Raymond Pettibon, Ed Ruscha, Sara Varon and many others.

[tylr-slidr userID=”36154778@N00″ groupID=””]http://www.flickr.com/photos/wactac/sets/72157623672605311/show/[/tylr-slidr]

After the library, we played around with the equipment that we will be using. Keeping true to the nature of the zine, Alex has decided to take a very low tech approach to production – relying on a handful of typewriters, xerox machines, font books, and letraset sheets. Knowing that most of the students are coming from the world of computer aided graphic design, Alex decided to set some guidelines for the workshop. Below is his “Made-By-Hand No Google Manifesto.”

Today we’ll be diving in to the “making” portion of the class by creating a zine in the span of 2 hours.  Follow our progress on the class blog and check out what we come up with on Thursday, April 29th at 6 pm in the Art Lab.

Top 5 Artworks that Need to be Identified as Art

A couple weeks ago the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC) visited David Bartley, Senior Registration Technician. As a part of our on going series of interviews with staff and artists, we asked David to show us his “Top 5 Artworks that Need to be Identified as Art.” [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1wH_apdxhY[/youtube]

A couple weeks ago the Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council (WACTAC) visited David Bartley, Senior Registration Technician. As a part of our on going series of interviews with staff and artists, we asked David to show us his “Top 5 Artworks that Need to be Identified as Art.”

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1wH_apdxhY[/youtube]

WAC Video Killed the Radio Star

Over the past five-weeks local director Maria Juranic has been dropping knowledge on emerging teen video makers in the Music Video Workshop in Teen Programs. We met twice a week, starting off with introductions in true WACTAC fashion where the group questioned each person for two minutes. If you were there it went something like […]

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Over the past five-weeks local director Maria Juranic has been dropping knowledge on emerging teen video makers in the Music Video Workshop in Teen Programs. We met twice a week, starting off with introductions in true WACTAC fashion where the group questioned each person for two minutes.

If you were there it went something like this Q: “Would you rather be blind or deaf?” A: “Blind” Q: “If you were a super hero, what super power would you posses?” A: “The power to bend things with my mind.” Q: “Who’s your favorite Muppet Baby?” A: “Animal.”  Q: “If  you could have any job what would it be?”A: “The President’s Wife.” Q: “Who’s the coolest person you know?” A:(Get ready for the aww factor) “My mom.” and a nother question I never quite understood Q: “Would you rather live under a rock or a log?” A: “What?” After priceless moments like these we got down to business.

MVW at Blake 006Maria, using her own work as an example including videos for local artists such as P.O.S, Cecil Otter and Eyedea & Abilities (see here), broke down the process of conception to completion. She showed us how to make treatments, storyboards, and shot lists. During the first week we warmed-up by making short videos set to Doomtree’s “Wait a Minute”, where editing took place in camera and groups worked togehter to interpret the music visually.

Out of a pool of music submissions from local high-school students, the video makers chose four bands/artists who they wanted to collaborate with, and were given three weeks to conceive of an idea, meet them, shoot the video and edit it.

In order to draw inspiration from other sources aside from popular media we toured the Dan Graham exhibition where we saw methods of using a camera as a mapping tool to explore relationships between space, others, and oneself, as well as viewing his music-based video work.

I spoke with Daniel Smith the Assistant Archivist about what other Walker films we could show the students. He pointed out a few artists who used music as an integral part to their film pieces and Maria, Witt, and I agreed on Kenneth Anger’s Scorpio Rising and Kustom Kar Kommandos, Bruce Conner’s Mongoloid, Charles Atlas’s Hail the New Puritan, and William Klein’s Broadway by Light.

As we watched Scorpio Rising, specifically the “initiation” scene towards the end, the air grew quiet, and the soft 50’s pop ballad intensified the drama of what unfolded before our eyes. “Was that for real or were they just playing?” a student asked.  “It seems really homo-erotic. That one guy seems to idolize James Dean. He takes his time showing us how each one prepares for the evening,” another comments. “He sensualizes the whole experience of putting on his rings and getting ready to go out.”

While some students chose to comment on content others commented on formal aspects like the use of color and contrast between leather-clad masculine figures and the choice of light-hearted music. Conner’s work generated a discussion about found footage and constructing narrative, while Klein’s piece offered suggestions about timing music to repetitious visuals.MVW at Blake 018

After a busy week of shooting inside and outside of the Walker, freezing in the elements, dead batteries, lost footage, late bands and plenty of fruit roll-ups, Rice Krispies, and Cheez-its, we are now in the final stages of production. Through a partnership with The Blake School, the students have been using the Blake Media Lab to edit their videos where they are hard at work putting the pieces of the process together.

Come by and view the fruits of their labor Wednesday, December 16th in the Lecture Room at 6pm with mmmmm, you said it, pizza to follow after!

Sleep On It: 24 Hours of Recovery

This post was written by Emmanuel Mauleon, Teen Programs Intern. After working for over 50 hours in the last four days I have to say that as I walked away from Don’t Sleep On It I was extremely tired. But I found myself wishing about an hour after it finished that I was still in […]

This post was written by Emmanuel Mauleon, Teen Programs Intern.

After working for over 50 hours in the last four days I have to say that as I walked away from Don’t Sleep On It I was extremely tired. But I found myself wishing about an hour after it finished that I was still in that small room in the California Building creating another three hour installation.

Don’t Sleep On It was a huge success. Aside from the issue of the time-lapse video going out for 12 hours, everything went off without a hitch. This was due in large part to all of the artists, and their commitment to keep all of our participants motivated through their sleep-walking/arting.

Thanks to Erin and Brett Smith for the convenience store, Chris Pennington for the cardboard city, Hardland/Heartland for the black hole (with help from M-Deathsquads), Burlesque for the BRLSQOTHEQUE (and the wall of bass), Kristina Mooney for the misty mountain landscape, Liz Miller for the felt and burlap oasis, Scott Stulen and Andy Ducett for the couch-fort/pastel-polygon, and lastly Broken Crow for the porcupine and spray paint free-for-all. Each of these installations were amazing and surprisingly different.

I’d also personally like to thank WACTAC for their commitment to staying awake and helping remove trash and debris while everyone else was making art. Nick & Shannon, word up.

Thanks to all of our participants, sponsors and funders. There will be a slew of photos in the upcoming days, so be on the look-out for that, but for now here’s the time lapse video.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MB7jVGSoDIg[/youtube]

I’m going back to bed now.

Admin edit: Added the corrected, longer version of the time-lapse video.

Broken Crow at WACTAC’s 24 Art-Making Marathon

In lead up to Don’t Sleep On It: 24 Hour Art Making Marathon, WACTAC did a couple interviews with some of the participating artists. The interview series continues with Twin Cities large scale stencil artist collective Broken Crow. [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSs0TL0oO3c&feature=channel_page[/youtube] If you haven’t already, check out the our first video interview with Hardland/Heartland.

Hardland/Heartland: Don’t Sleep On This Interview!

As WACTAC (Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council) gears up for the 24-hour marathon art-making madness that will be Don’t Sleep on It, we’re getting to know our participating artists through a series of snappy little videos. While there just isn’t enough time between now and May 15 to interview all eight groups of artists, […]

As WACTAC (Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council) gears up for the 24-hour marathon art-making madness that will be Don’t Sleep on It, we’re getting to know our participating artists through a series of snappy little videos. While there just isn’t enough time between now and May 15 to interview all eight groups of artists, check back here for more information on who’s who and what they do. Especially keep an eye out for video interviews with Burlesque Design, John Grider of BrokenCrow, and Scott Stulen coming fresh from the WACTAC video production team in the next few weeks.

For now, check out our inaugural video interview with members of Hardland/Heartland, featuring the Walker’s very own Aaron Anderson.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWZ-9SIQsoQ[/youtube]

Don’t Sleep on It: A 24-Hour Art-Making Marathon kicks off on May 15 at 6pm and runs through May 16, with a closing party at 8pm. For a full schedule of artist led activities and musical performances, visit teens.walkerart.org or shoot us an email at teenprograms@walkerart.org

Art On Call and Teen Artists

Over the past years I have had difficulties getting teen artists to produce quality writing about their work. Many times a printed artist statement and biography written by a teen artist doesn’t give much insight to how they developed the work, what inspires them, or what they are trying to convey through their art. Although […]

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Over the past years I have had difficulties getting teen artists to produce quality writing about their work. Many times a printed artist statement and biography written by a teen artist doesn’t give much insight to how they developed the work, what inspires them, or what they are trying to convey through their art. Although a print piece is valuable in terms of permanence, for teen programs, Art on Call has been the perfect companion to the traditional written artist statement. As mentioned in a previous post, Art on Call can be interesting way of bringing artists voices into galleries, cinema, and theater.

Check out some of the Art on Call artist statements that we produced for last year’s multidisciplinary teen art show 20 Under 20 and the 13 Most Beautiful Young Artists performance (Warning: shameless plug – check it out tomorrow night!).

I would love to hear about technologies that educators are using to bring young artists voices into exhibition spaces. Educators, do you have any success stories? Visitors, are these info devices helpful to you? Do you use these devices?

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