Blogs Field Guide Courtney Gerber

I'm the Assistant Director of Education, Tour Programs at the Walker Art Center. When I'm not chatting art with the Walker's tour guides I'm running (generally not away from something), digging in my garden, reading on my deck, writing, or enjoying a gin martini.

FlatPak and Field Office Have Arrived

FlatPak is Back! This past Saturday, May 21, the FlatPak House, designed by Minneapolis-based Lazor Office, re-opened to the public offering familiar features and a few new tricks. On Saturdays from 10 am–4 pm and Sundays from 12 noon–4 pm you can stop by the house and use it as the hippest visitor center in […]

FlatPak is Back!

This past Saturday, May 21, the FlatPak House, designed by Minneapolis-based Lazor Office, re-opened to the public offering familiar features and a few new tricks. On Saturdays from 10 am–4 pm and Sundays from 12 noon–4 pm you can stop by the house and use it as the hippest visitor center in the city. Talk with Walker staff about the FlatPak, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, or the Walker Art Center. Sit on one of the comfy green couches courtesy of Blu Dot and contemplate the structure’s architecture, flip through an issue of Dwell or one of the prefab architecture books on the coffee table, or lay your head back and enjoy a siesta. Occasionally, Walker tour guides will be on hand to offer on-demand tours of the Garden that will take off from the FlatPak.

Lounge in the FlatPak © Cameron Wittig

Sit. Read. © Cameron Wittig

Give Field Office a try!

During the week, a little something different will be happening in the FlatPak. As part of Open Field, the Education and Community Programs staff will be in-residence with the FlatPak serving as a public office and activity space under the name Field Office. Field Office is designed as a way to reflect, connect, and research new ideas openly and collaboratively. From June through August we will be hosting informal conversations and activities related to our interests in learning and public engagement. We’re also there to talk with anyone who stops by. Everything is free and open to the public so please wander in and join us. Some projects already on the schedule include Open Phenology, a series of roving conversations and field notes focused on natural phenomena, and Amanda Lovelee’s discussion on activating space and changing the world using mini-manuals as part of her Call and Answer Project.

 

Museum Leaders in the Making Part 2

“Contrary to what I believed as a little girl, being the boss almost never involves marching around, waving your arms, and chanting, ‘I am the boss! I am the boss!’”  —Tina Fey from her book Bossypants I’d have to agree with Tina, leading people isn’t about the status it affords you. It’s about creating a […]

“Contrary to what I believed as a little girl, being the boss almost never involves marching around, waving your arms, and chanting, ‘I am the boss! I am the boss!’”  —Tina Fey from her book Bossypants

I’d have to agree with Tina, leading people isn’t about the status it affords you. It’s about creating a work environment that encourages thoughtful participation by all employees. In the case of museums it’s also about creating an environment in which visitors want to participate. (For a thought-provoking read on how museums are negotiating a shift toward a more participatory model I recommend an article by Adam Gopnik in The Walrus from June 2007 called “The Mindful Museum.” Nowadays, museums may even be asking themselves if the ideal would be to have visitors who feel comfortable enough with and connected enough to the content before them to wander the galleries chanting, “I am the boss! I am the boss!” Can you imagine this kind of ownership? Maybe it would be more like, “Art is the boss. But I’m definitely a collaborator!”

In my last blog, Museum Leaders in the Making, I gave a broad-stroke introduction to NextGen, a museum leadership program I attended back in March. In my blog I promised to follow-up with a few more posts that dig deeper into the issues and ideas that surfaced in my first reminiscence. The first lesson in leadership: hold one’s self accountable for following through on promises made. (Hence, blog #2 albeit delivered a little later than I’d hoped.)

2011 © Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University

In this blog I’m going to expand upon one of the Facebook status updates I made while in California that considers subjectivity and adaptability in leaders and leadership. What will blog 3 look like? Not sure yet. If you have any opinions based on what you’ve read in my first two entries, please let me know. Some contenders are work-life balance and thoughts on modulating between personal and professional arenas; looking at the heightened competition and demands museums face in an ever flatter world robust with choices; the power of metaphor in understanding one’s organization; and decoding organizational structures.

On to the status update … Basically, I posted quotes from one of the week’s scholars, Bill Sternbergh. “You see the world as you are not how it is.” Also, “as the boss it’s your responsibility to adapt rather than expecting others to change.”

Let’s separate out the two bits. First, “You see the world as you are and not how it is.” This may not be a huge revelation for most of us, but it’s something to be reminded of once in a while: humility. So, in my work I can assume that my understanding of the world is highly subjective. To go even narrower, I can assume that my understanding of my field, museum education, is highly subjective. This isn’t to say a theory I put forward is not based on observation and empirical evidence I’m gathering through research; it simply suggests that my motivations will always be colored by my reading of the current state of __________________(fill in the blank). Perhaps this is why bit number two is so crucial: “as the boss it’s your responsibility to adapt rather than expecting others to change.” Boss in this statement goes beyond the individual manager. What if we think of the boss as a stand-in for the museum? When the museum is understood as (or actively embracing) taking on a leadership role it needs to act more organically and collaboratively than may feel comfortable if it’s going to adapt to the changing needs of its audiences. This sounds simple, but it’s actually quite challenging. Building and nurturing relationships is hard work and this is essentially what goes into creating stronger and clearer pathways for communication between people and between organizations (museums) and people (museum visitors).

Artist Guillermo Kuitca and Drawing Club enthusiasts at Open Field last summer. Drawing Club met every Thursday from 2-7pm and was open to anyone interested in creating. It'll be back again this summer as part of Open Field 2011. 2010 © Walker Art Center

Museums as leaders within their communities (and beyond) need to act with intention. This comes from something interesting Douglas McLennan, founder and editor of ArtsJournal, discussed during his NextGen seminar—it’s not just about offering an experience or grabbing someone’s attention, but rather it’s about cultivating relationships. There is a lot of choice in the world today. If museums want people to choose them they need to extend a hand, actively listen, and, to borrow the words of Tate Modern Director Nicholas Serota, “… respond to and become places where ideas, opinions and experiences are exchanged, and not simply learned.” (Here’s a companion piece to the Gopnik article mentioned above: “Why Tate Modern Needs to Expand,” The Art Newspaper , May 2010. Museums need to intentionally invite a new kind of interaction, one that doesn’t do away with the specialized knowledge and talent of curators, educators, exhibition developers, etc., but rather provides opportunities for the commingling of expert voices (“Art is the boss.”) and public contribution (“But I’m definitely a collaborator!”)

A few final nuggets along these same lines:

  • The more interaction is allowed the more trust is developed.
  • You give up control to gain influence.
  • You have to practice relationships to get better at them.

These are statements to grapple with for sure. Solid truths? Maybe. Maybe not. But the way in which the world is operating, and people are wending their way through it, begs that we (you, me, and museums) ask the question. I might edit the second statement to read, “You share control to gain influence.” What do you think?

Blog number three will be coming up in a month or so.

Other Walker blogs that connect with some of the ideas I’m putting forward:

Arts Institutions: Cathedrals, Town Squares—or Both?

Open Field (multiple blogs)

 


Knit, Crochet, and Talk Art this Saturday

In the spirit of MN Made, a number of knitting and crocheting tour guides will be on hand this Saturday, 4/9 beginning at noon to talk art while in the midst of making. What could be better than talking Freud and dreams in Midnight Party with the clacking of needles and hooks as your live […]

In the spirit of MN Made, a number of knitting and crocheting tour guides will be on hand this Saturday, 4/9 beginning at noon to talk art while in the midst of making. What could be better than talking Freud and dreams in Midnight Party with the clacking of needles and hooks as your live soundtrack? If you’re a knitter or crocheter, bring your own projects and work alongside the tour guide. It’ll put a whole new spin on the idea of the knitting circle. Look for the knitting or crocheting guide with the Art Chat button and strike up a conversation.

Here’s the equation:

 

+

 

 

 

+

 

 

= novel experience

Museum Leaders in the Making

What is your definition of leadership? This was the question posed to me and my twenty-five colleagues on day one of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen program, which took place at Claremont Graduate University in sunny (and snowless) Claremont, CA last month. NextGen is an intensive five-day course designed for junior museum staff interested in […]

What is your definition of leadership? This was the question posed to me and my twenty-five colleagues on day one of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen program, which took place at Claremont Graduate University in sunny (and snowless) Claremont, CA last month. NextGen is an intensive five-day course designed for junior museum staff interested in leading and identified by senior staff as possessing the potential to do so. The posse gathered in Claremont was made up of curators, new media and technology specialists, educators (like me), registrars, project managers, grant writers, exhibition coordinators, and more. We represented three countries, twelve states, and anything from contemporary art to science to antiquities to plants to the history of the New York City subway.  Some of us are currently directing departments and others of us are poised to supervise people and projects in the months and years to come. A few of us hoped to gain insight into the joy and pain of “climbing the ladder.” All of us had a lot to share and even more to learn.

2011 © Getty Leadership Institute at Claremont Graduate University

What I’d like to do over the next few weeks is share some of what I took away from this professional development experience with the hope of shedding light on the concerns and ambitions of a sampling of people invested in the vitality of your cultural institutions. People who are working toward assuring the relevance of these places and their capacity to inspire—learning how to lead in the broadest sense of the word. Think of my blog posts as behind-the-scenes glimpses into how one museum professional shifted her thinking from the micro level of her specialty area (managing a corps of 100 tour guides and participating in the development of interpretive strategies) to the macro level of the psychology of her home organization and, even further magnified, museums generally.

I’ll share the nuts and bolts from my week such as the “syllabus” we lived and breathed, articulate the larger themes that surfaced throughout the week, and offer a selection of my personal “ahas”—approaches to leading that I hope to enact in my job at Walker.

Now, getting back to the question that launched this post: What is your definition of leadership? I can’t remember my exact response, but it was something like, “A leader shepherds people from the idea phase to the action phase.” I do think this is one part of what a leader does; however, I appreciated NextGen faculty member Bill Sternbergh’s definition: A leader makes the world a little more like the way he or she would like it to be. It’s about learning how to most effectively use yourself. He and his colleagues followed this by aptly reminding us that a person volunteers to lead and with leadership comes responsibility—a willingness to accept that people are both messy and beautiful and the ability to focus as best you can on the latter quality rather than dwell on and damn the former. If you’re going to lead (well) you must hone your ability to adapt, empathize, respond, challenge, and offer direction. This charge not only relates to one leading within one’s organization, but also to how museums at large interact with their publics—external leadership, so to speak.

In ending my first post, I’d like to share with you the syllabus for and my Facebook status updates from my week at NextGen. I’ll be building off of them in future posts. Thanks for reading and helping me process. I’d be interested in hearing your own reflections on what it means to lead in your museum, organization, or community. Leave a comment and let’s get a discussion rolling.

Syllabus: NextGen

Day 1: Building a learning community; Looking inward—understanding our multi-rater (“Benchmarks“) feedback and the results of other personality and relationship assessments (This day was about identifying our typical modes of operating and relating, our challenges, and support networks.)

Day 2: Building effective relationships and tactics of influence; Theories of leadership and learning to lead from wherever you are in your organization

Day 3: Conflict management—seeing the growth potential in conflict; Gender and leadership (Here’s some food for thought: the differences within gender are larger than differences between genders.); Team work; Strategic planning

Day 4: Transitions (Biggest learning here were acknowledging that people transition at different paces. Just because I’ve let go of something it doesn’t mean someone else has.); Financial sustainability; Mentors, modeling, and protégés

Day 5: The museum leadership landscape: an open source future (AKA: how are people currently using technology, how does this use affect the way a person interfaces with the world generally, and what does this mean for museums?)

Discussion of life/work balance was interwoven throughout our sessions.

Facebook Status Reports: NextGen

March 13, 2011

Not sure how to feel about business books that investigate the psychological well-being of Tolstoy, conclude that a therapist wouldn’t have helped, and that he just needed a friend to reassure him that time in the “Neutral Zone” was a perfectly normal part of life’s transitions.

March 15, 2011

“You see the world as you are not how it is.” The wisdom of Bill Sternbergh. Good stuff from NextGen 2011 at CGU. Also, “as the boss it’s your responsibility to adapt rather than expecting others to change.” Big fat blog entries coming up when I have consistent internet access. Will let you know when I post.

March 15, 2011 (Post 1)

What are the opportunities and challenges of an intergenerational work environment? How does a vocabulary steeped in class assumptions influence the effectiveness of how museums communicate with their publics? Just a few questions addressed thus far at day 2 of NextGen.

March 15, 2011 (Post 2)

People are beautiful and messy. Try to focus on the beauty. Good advice coming out of another NextGen discussion.

March 16, 2011

I am a citizen of my organization.

March 17, 2011

Let go of having to be right.

March 19, 2011

The grand adventure at Claremont has ended and I feel drawn to these well-known words from Gandhi: “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Blog posts will come in a few days with digests from what I learned this week at the Getty’s NextGen program.

American Sign Language Tours Every Free First Saturday

In the Walker’s ongoing effort to provide equal access to its programming we’ve begun offering ASL-interpreted tours at 2pm on the first Saturday of every month. The tours are free, begin in the Bazinet Garden Lobby, last about one hour, and are open to anyone.  It’s so easy. You don’t even need to register. The […]

In the Walker’s ongoing effort to provide equal access to its programming we’ve begun offering ASL-interpreted tours at 2pm on the first Saturday of every month. The tours are free, begin in the Bazinet Garden Lobby, last about one hour, and are open to anyone.  It’s so easy. You don’t even need to register.

The topics vary, but generally focus on a current exhibition or, when there’s a little less snow on the ground, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. This Saturday’s interpreter is Lisa Sindt.

Come on in and join the conversation. Bring a friend!

Questions? E-mail access@walkerart.org.

Assistive listening devices are also available.

Contemporary Art 101 When You Want It

The next time you’re in one of the Walker’s galleries, especially on a Thursday night, you might see a tour guide with an expression on her or his face that screams, “Talk to me.” Well, screams might be a bit strong. How about invitingly says? Art Chat is the next big thing in guided tours. […]

The next time you’re in one of the Walker’s galleries, especially on a Thursday night, you might see a tour guide with an expression on her or his face that screams, “Talk to me.” Well, screams might be a bit strong. How about invitingly says? Art Chat is the next big thing in guided tours. At least, we’re hoping it might be.  

On Target Free Thursday Nights and other bustling attendance moments Art Chat guides roam the galleries solo, approaching individuals or small groups to talk about whatever they’re encountering. Luanne Coleman, a 10-year tour guide veteran, was initially apprehensive about the looser format.  “I thought it would be akin to cold-calling visitors,” she says, “but it’s been a lot of fun.” She tailors her talking points to suit whomever she engages and when she can’t explain a piece, she tries to help visitors develop their own interpretations. It’s about spontaneous conversations that can go deep or stay simple, offering a taste rather than a five-course meal.

Curt Lund, a guide since 2003, appreciates the flexibility of the Art Chat format. He can talk with people anywhere in the gallery and is a fearless leader when it comes to “busting the Midwestern ‘personal space’ bubble,” as he puts it. Lund has found that once patrons know the guides are available and approachable, “they’ll often invite you in.”

We live in a society where, most of us, are accustomed to getting our questions answered almost immediately thanks to our smart phones, our friends’ smart phones (if you’re a dinosaur like me), or the neighborhood café’s free Wi-Fi. Consider Art Chat guides your Bing or Google but with a pulse, smile and ability and willingness to customize on the spot. Oh, and they rarely mysteriously go off-line.

Remembering a Minneapolis Sculpture Garden Favorite

Admit it. Whenever you set foot in the Garden you have a ritual. Some of you may slowly pore over the words on Jenny Holzer’s granite benches. Others of you may swing yourselves dizzy on Mark di Suvero’s giant Arikidea — a spider composed of a skyscraper. Many of you do your best to take […]

Admit it. Whenever you set foot in the Garden you have a ritual. Some of you may slowly pore over the words on Jenny Holzer’s granite benches.

Others of you may swing yourselves dizzy on Mark di Suvero’s giant Arikidea — a spider composed of a skyscraper.

Many of you do your best to take that perfect, illusionistic snapshot of a friend biting into Claes Oldenburg and Coosja von Bruggen’s giant, metal cherry.

Well, if any of you are like me you also make some time to frame our petite but pleasant skyline through David Nash’s Standing Frame. Nash’s sculpture with its animated legs and giant view finder is no longer a resident of the Garden. The piece was removed in November because, in its twenty-third year of existence, it reached its natural end. The timbers decomposed from the inside out making the work structurally unsound.

When this news was shared with the Walker tour guides many of them wanted to share farewells. Below are some highlights from those who knew the work well. Read their thoughts, then please share some of your own as a comment. We’d like to hear your goodbye to Standing Frame and learn about other works in the Garden that are  meaningful to you.

“I have no contained stories or memorable quotes about the standing frame, though it was, in some ways, a moving piece to tour. Thinking about the observation that we look at nature through windows these days and through car windows at that, people would focus on what images of nature the work helps us see instead.  How could we look at trees when the frame was so high?  Was Nash only interested in our looking at clouds and sky? From what vantage point could the work frame the Basilica? As we moved around it, the more-or-less geometric frame on a tripod morphed into a headless walking creature framing nothing; we’d wonder about heads, tree-made bodies and how we find the images we see.” –Christine McVay

“I have loved Nash’s ecological sensibility, which I like to share with tour participants of all ages. Kids have always enjoyed going into the trees, standing on the block of concrete, and seeing the framed view of Mpls.  I’ve also liked the fun of comparison/contrast with Woodrow—kids think Woodrow is made of wood, then we talk about why it needs to be of more durable material. Then when we get to Standing Frame, although it looks like wood, they think it probably isn’t! So that is always a fun twist. Now I guess I will just show a photo of Standing Frame to exemplify why Woodrow is made of bronze. That won’t be nearly as much fun, though.

I also thought it made an interesting pair with Turrell’s Sky Pesher. Both framed sky, but the standing frame included the tops of trees and buildings and you could see things around the frame whereas Sky Pesher isolates the sky. It made for an interesting compare and contrast.” –Nancy Beach

Standing Frame has been one of my favorite pieces.  We all know it frames the Basilica, but children also think it looks like a TV set or a camera (it has knobs and also legs). I love to have the children imagine the sculptures coming alive at night and our frame taking pictures. It is fascinating to think of the Di Suvero’s Arikidea walking about and Woodrow galloping through the Garden with the frame capturing all the action.  Just think of the ways the sculptures would move about. I will miss the piece.” –Carol Bossman

“I love the arguments as to which is the best spot to stand on to look through the frame.  As with all art, it’s all in your personal perspective.” –Jenny Skinner

“Nash’s Standing Frame is always on my tour of the garden, and I grieve its departure. 

His premise that nature frames our viewpoint is so welcome. Indeed it is all we have, in spite of our contrivances.

I loved watching everyone look at it from both sides, with the taller people insisting they could see the Cathedral.  It created lots of jumping…sometimes from greyhairs like me. 

My friend Odell, noticed that the tree trunks were upside down. 

And I liked it because it came from Taylor’s Falls, where I had learned to climb sheer faces. 

And it cast a shadow on our broader view of the world.

Love to the decay of the Standing Frame.  It has made an important impact.

Let it rest.”
–Lauri Rockne

“ … A great piece to tour and so well received given its local materials, brilliant design and concept. Its fragility is part of its beauty. –Sandy Boss Febbo

What’s your ode to Standing Frame?

A Lively Discussion on the Field about What Makes Something Art

When you work at the Walker on staff or as a volunteer you will, at least once during your tenure, be asked the following question: Why is this art? Depending on the person she or he may feel panicked or revved by this honest and valid inquiry. A number of us gathered on Open Field […]

When you work at the Walker on staff or as a volunteer you will, at least once during your tenure, be asked the following question: Why is this art? Depending on the person she or he may feel panicked or revved by this honest and valid inquiry.

A number of us gathered on Open Field in its final week to discuss our take on what is art and what, well, it maybe isn’t. The group: 4 tour guides, 1 college professor, 1 curator/artist, 2 Walker staff. The beer: Boulevard sampler pack. Length of discussion: 1 hour and 45 minutes.

Discussion participants

I introduced the topic and mentioned why we were gathering. In short, a number of tour guides from the Walker and other Twin Cities museums asked for an opportunity to come together and talk openly about ways of approaching contemporary art with visitors who have varying degrees of exposure to it. Below are some conversation strands and open-ended questions that surfaced during our gathering.

  • The guides remarked that visitors often question the quality of a work in the gallery by saying that it is ugly, disgusting, not beautiful, confusing and disingenuous, and “I could make that.” What are some of the works that visitors connect to these descriptions?

Ugly and disgusting:

Paul Thek's Hippopotamus from Technological Reliquaries, 1965

Not beautiful:

Thomas Hirschhorn's Abstract Relief: Archaeology, 2000

Confusing and disingenuous:

Trisha Donnelly's Untitled, 2008

“I could make that:”

Ellsworth Kelly's Red Yellow Blue III, 1966

Guides feel that such pointed responses are actually positive – they demonstrate that people are having a reaction and therefore may be ready to talk about what they are or aren’t seeing. A statement such as “This work of art is not beautiful” is a terrific lead-in to a discussion about how one defines art in the first place. What expectations does one have for art? Does it need to be beautiful?  Can one be open to art that isn’t physically beautiful or whose execution appears quick and cobbled rather than labored and technically pristine? These questions are deceptively challenging but most people, young and old, are willing to explore them. All of a sudden we’re asking how the framework for critiquing contemporary art may be different than what we’re used to, still evolving, personal, and imperfect. (Then again, what system of critique is perfect?)

  • What’s the viewer’s responsibility in completing a work of art? Does she or he have any? (A resounding YES for our group.) We went round and round with this one citing Marcel Duchamp’s The Creative Act and how one’s body relates to a work of art in space is behind the “activation” of Minimalist sculpture, among other explanations for why we’re (the viewer) important to the “life” of an object or idea. Most expressed that they see meaning derived from a work as varying from person to person and that this flexibility makes contemporary art relatable for most (with a little guidance).  This is a strategy used by tour guides all the time to increase people’s comfort level with art that you can’t instantly categorize or that’s “easy” to look at.

 

  • Relating to the above strand was a discussion about whether a work of art can exist in a vacuum (or the dank corners of one’s basement). Most feel that art isn’t art until it’s released into the world.

 

  • The group acknowledged that oftentimes visitors feel that they’re not allowed to have an opinion if they don’t have years of experience with art, and wouldn’t it be great if more people felt empowered to disagree with the experts (i.e., curators and the artists themselves) or at least question why X made it into an exhibition rather than Y. Giving people space to not like what they see is crucial. This space doesn’t exist if a person has no context for what they’re viewing. Context may come through a discussion with a guide or the way a show is installed. It’s not necessarily going to be provided by a work of art. We were unresolved in terms of whether a work of art is responsible for offering context even if minimal.

 

Adriana Rimpel is on a roll

  • Recognizing that we don’t have the luxury of time/historical perspective when it comes to critiquing work being made now can help people understand the challenges and excitement behind curating contemporary collections and exhibitions, maybe even fostering a bit of empathy for those doing it.

 

  • It’s important to address head-on that the art being made today, art that is considered ground-breaking and lauded by critics and institutions alike, may elevate process over product or thinking over making. This is a tough one for a lot of people, as the general public still views Art as hand-crafted objects whereas institutions accept Art as ideas to grapple and argue with that may or may not look like much at all.

 

I’d invite those who were at the discussion to add to what I’ve said, challenge my interpretation of our chat, or pose additional questions. One last thought, a quote from Mark Allen of Machine Project in LA, “Art creates a space of possibility.” What a nice idea …

Come and Enjoy a Spanish Language Tour of Guillermo Kuitca: Everything

The Walker will offer six public Spanish-language tours of Guillermo Kuitca: Everything over the run of the exhibition. The tours coincide with select Target Free Thursday Nights and Free First Saturdays. Enter the world of Kuitca with one of our skilled guides at your side for a meaningful and dynamic conversation. The tours will begin […]

The Walker will offer six public Spanish-language tours of Guillermo Kuitca: Everything over the run of the exhibition. The tours coincide with select Target Free Thursday Nights and Free First Saturdays. Enter the world of Kuitca with one of our skilled guides at your side for a meaningful and dynamic conversation. The tours will begin in the Bazinet Garden Lobby and last approximately one hour. No reservation required, just arrive five minutes prior to the start of the tour and look for the sign indicating where to gather. / El Walker ofrecerá seis giras públicas en español durante el transcurso de la exposición Guillermo Kuitca: Everything. Las giras públicas coincidirán con selectivos Noches Jueves Gratis de Target (Target Free Thursday Nights) y Primer Sábados Gratis (Free First Saturdays). Entra al mundo de Kuitca con uno de nuestros guías capacitados a su lado y participa en una conversación dinámica y significativa. La gira empezará en el Bazinet Garden Lobby y durará aproximadamente una hora. No requiere reservaciones para participar en la gira. Favor de llegar cinco minutos antes del comienzo de la gira y buscar los letreros indicando donde se reunirá.

Tours/Giras:

Thursday, July 8, 6pm/8 de julio, jueves a las 6pm
Thursday, July 22, 6pm/22 de julio, jueves a las 6pm
Thursday, August 5, 6pm/5 de agosto, jueves a las 6pm
Saturday, August 7, 2pm/7 de agosto, sábado a las 2pm
Thursday, August 26, 6pm/26 de agosto, jueves a las 2pm
Saturday, September 4, 2pm/4 de septiembre, sábado a las 2pm

Artist Guillermo Kuitca. Photo by Gene Pittman.

Witnessing a Community Partnership in Full Bloom

For the last two years the Walker and Lifeworks Services, Inc. have collaborated in unique and meaningful ways. Walker staff has juried the Lifeworks Traveling Art Show and invited dozens of Lifeworks clients to the Walker for tours and art-making. The concept for the three-dimensional centerpieces/sculptures decorating the tables at Lifeworks’ annual gala this year […]

For the last two years the Walker and Lifeworks Services, Inc. have collaborated in unique and meaningful ways. Walker staff has juried the Lifeworks Traveling Art Show and invited dozens of Lifeworks clients to the Walker for tours and art-making. The concept for the three-dimensional centerpieces/sculptures decorating the tables at Lifeworks’ annual gala this year and last originated from Walker Art Lab Coordinator Ilene Krug Mojsilov.

Centerpiece in progress

A Lifeworks' client/artist putting the finishing touches on her creation.

Lifeworks staff and clients actively participate in the Walker’s Open Door Access Advisory Group, offering counsel on the effectiveness of our programming for individuals with disabilities. Their insights continue to expand how we think, educate and experience art.

Our organizations’ missions have complimentary strands and this feeds a partnership that continues to grow and surprise us. We serve and engage our communities, examine the myriad questions and events that shape us as individuals, and celebrate the creative impulses unique to people.

To see our collaboration in action view this short film capturing Lifeworks’ clients at the Walker discussing and making art. The film was screened at Lifeworks’ annual gala in recognition of our partnership.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNqEkVjPH0o[/youtube]

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