Blogs Field Guide Christina Alderman

I am program manager for families at the Walker, which works out great since I like making big messes and lots of noise.

Viewfinder: Kids on Vija Celmins

by Emma Cohen At our April Free First Saturday event, we asked kids what they thought about the artworks in the exhibition Lifelike. Here is what Faye, age 10, and Megan, age 11, had to say about one of their favorites: Vija Celmins, Eggs Pick one word to describe this work of art: Outstanding Why […]

by Emma Cohen

At our April Free First Saturday event, we asked kids what they thought about the artworks in the exhibition Lifelike. Here is what Faye, age 10, and Megan, age 11, had to say about one of their favorites:

Vija Celmins, Eggs

Pick one word to describe this work of art: Outstanding

Why did you pick that word? Has different shading and a pop of color.

Tell us if there is something you don’t like and why. It looks like it’s smudged. The yellow is “runny.”

What does it make you think about?  Breakfast at Bakers Square.

Make up a story about this work of art… There was a man and a woman that were in a fight and the man was cooking and on purpose he “popped” [the egg].

 

We’re collecting young people’s thoughts on art all the time. What does your child have to say? Come visit the Walker, pick up an ArtThink worksheet, and let her tell us what she thinks!

 

Viewfinder posts are your opportunity to “show & tell” about the everyday arts happenings, interesting sights and sounds made or as seen by Minnesota artists, because art is where you find it.  Submit your own informal, first-person responses to the art around you to katie(at)mnartists.org, and we may well publish your piece here on the blog. (Guidelines: 300 words or less, not about your own event/work, and please include an image, media, video, or audio file, and one sentence about yourself.)

Viewfinder: Kids on Robert Therrien

By Emma Cohen At our April Free First Saturday event, we asked kids what they thought about the artworks in the exhibition Lifelike. Here is what some of them said about one of their favorites: Robert Therrien, Folding Table and Chairs Pick one word to describe this work of art: Huge. Why? It isn’t tiny. […]

By Emma Cohen

At our April Free First Saturday event, we asked kids what they thought about the artworks in the exhibition Lifelike. Here is what some of them said about one of their favorites:

Robert Therrien, Folding Table and Chairs

Pick one word to describe this work of art:

Huge. Why? It isn’t tiny. –Becca, age 6

Interesting. Why? The artist looked from an interesting perspective, and it made me feel as if I was very small. –Noor, age 10

Giant. Why? I picked giant because the table and the chairs look like a giant could sit on them. –Ahlea, age 7

 

Tell us if there is something you don’t like and why.

I don’t like that we want to sit on it [and aren’t allowed to]. Because I think that it would be really fun to sit on it. –Oslbar, age 10

I feel too small. –Niyema, age 7

It reminds me of giants. I do not like giants.—Katherine, age 7

 

Make up a story about this work of art…

One day in a forest far away, two giants had a basket of food and couldn’t find any place to eat. They walked and walked until they found a giant table and 3 chairs. They said that this would be good and sat down to eat. The End. –Oslbar, age 10

Once upon a time there was a table and chairs and then I turned very small and I liked being very small , so I stayed like that. The end.—Jacob, age 6

Once upon a time there was a man named Robert Therrien. Robert Therrien saw a giant crying. He asked him why he was crying and the giant said, “I don’t have any chairs or table.” The man gave him some chairs and a table. –Alhea, age 7

 

We’re collecting young people’s thoughts on art all the time. What does your child have to say? Come visit the Walker, pick up an ArtThink worksheet, and let her tell us what she thinks!

 

Viewfinder posts are your opportunity to “show & tell” about the everyday arts happenings, interesting sights and sounds made or as seen by Minnesota artists, because art is where you find it.  Submit your own informal, first-person responses to the art around you to katie(at)mnartists.org, and we may well publish your piece here on the blog. (Guidelines: 300 words or less, not about your own event/work, and please include an image, media, video, or audio file, and one sentence about yourself.)

April Free First Saturday

by Emma Cohen When was the last time you saw an elephant on a surfboard? Or made teeth with your bare hands? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you must have missed April Free First Saturday. Here’s what happened on that zany day of fun. The Textile Center created a dazzling hanging […]

by Emma Cohen

When was the last time you saw an elephant on a surfboard? Or made teeth with your bare hands? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you must have missed April Free First Saturday. Here’s what happened on that zany day of fun.

The Textile Center created a dazzling hanging garden in the Star Tribune Foundation Art Lab. Kids rolled, smushed, and played with wool fibers and soapy water to make leaves, flowers, bugs, and rocks out of felt. The colorful creations were sewn into a garden on a tie-dyed cloth that will be on display at the Textile center this fall.

Making Felt

The Finished Felt Garden

In Gallery 8, families showed off–and created–their toothy grins. Using modeling clay, paper, and markers, kids made replicas of their teeth and recalled memories of front teeth, cuspids, and molars. Children also made big gaping jaws that could open and close!

 

Making Teeth

Downstairs, the sounds of giggling trickled through the closed Cinema doors. Inside, Chris Monroe and Kevin Kling read their new collaborative book, Big Little Brother. We laughed and sang with Kevin, and he told us stories about his real-life brother on whom the book is based. (Like how people thought his brother was angry because he often clenched his fists, but really he was just clutching bits of donuts!)

Then they read Chris’s book Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Seaside Shenanigans. Kevin’s voices were so funny, Chris had to pause her storytelling because she was laughing too hard! Some kids asked why Chico the monkey had a gumball in his tool belt. Chris figured he could chew the gum and use the wad to plug up a hole in a pipe. “Don’t try that at home,” she said. “Only with supervision,” Kevin added mischievously.

And of course, Kevin and Chris chatted with Walker visitors and signed books after the readings.

Kevin Kling

 

Chris Monroe

We encourage you to read these wonderful picture books, and also to come explore the ideas of reality and fiction at our next Free First Saturday on May 5!

Big Little Brother: An Interview With Chris Monroe

by Emma Cohen   What do Neil Diamond, Daffy Duck and Gustav Klimt have in common? They were all influential to Chris Monroe, illustrator of the new book Big Little Brother, written by Kevin Kling. Whether your children grew up on Kevin Kling’s stories, you have always loved Chris Monroe’s comics, or you have never […]

by Emma Cohen

 

What do Neil Diamond, Daffy Duck and Gustav Klimt have in common? They were all influential to Chris Monroe, illustrator of the new book Big Little Brother, written by Kevin Kling. Whether your children grew up on Kevin Kling’s stories, you have always loved Chris Monroe’s comics, or you have never heard of either of them, you are invited to hear them speak! Kevin Kling and Chris Monroe will be showing audiences their book at both 11 am and 1 pm at the Walker’s Free First Saturday event on April 7.

Big Little Brother tells the story of a boy who is annoyed by his younger brother but who discovers that a pesky sibling can actually become a friend. Childhood is full of adventures and new knowledge. Here’s what happened when Chris Monroe shared her childhood with us:

(more…)

Giddy Excited For Lifelike

by Emma Cohen Ever wondered what it would feel like to be a mouse? Or a giant? Or to travel through secret spaces on your way to work? At our smash-hit March Free First Saturday event,  we asked kids what they thought about Maurizio Cattelan’s artwork Untitled (Elevators) in the Walker’s new exhibit Lifelike. Here […]

by Emma Cohen

Ever wondered what it would feel like to be a mouse? Or a giant? Or to travel through secret spaces on your way to work?

At our smash-hit March Free First Saturday event,  we asked kids what they thought about Maurizio Cattelan’s artwork Untitled (Elevators) in the Walker’s new exhibit Lifelike.

Here is some of what they had to say:

(more…)

March 3 Free First Saturday Sneak Peak

by Emma Cohen Craving some artsy family fun? Here is a preview of upcoming programming. March 3 is a day of foreign flix, including seven shorts from Germany, South Africa, UK, France, Iran, and Canada, and an animated feature-length Japanese movie. Everyone feels lonely sometimes. So when we saw these films about loneliness and friendship, we knew […]

by Emma Cohen

Craving some artsy family fun? Here is a preview of upcoming programming. March 3 is a day of foreign flix, including seven shorts from Germany, South Africa, UK, France, Iran, and Canada, and an animated feature-length Japanese movie.

Everyone feels lonely sometimes. So when we saw these films about loneliness and friendship, we knew we had to snatch them up and show them to you.  These works explore how characters overcome fear, boring rules, and even gravity to make friends and experience the beauty of the world–even if things don’t always turn out as planned!

In “Mobile,”  a 2010 German film by Verena Fels, a solitary cow literally flips her world upside down in order to make a friend.

(more…)

Chicago International Children’s Film Festival: Day 3

I cannot recall watching a feature length documentary in the 5 years I have been coming to the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, but today I decide to get jiggy with it! I mean Jig as in Irish Dance. This documentary had a bit if buzz among the programmer, so I thought would check it […]

I cannot recall watching a feature length documentary in the 5 years I have been coming to the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival, but today I decide to get jiggy with it! I mean Jig as in Irish Dance. This documentary had a bit if buzz among the programmer, so I thought would check it out. It’s risky to watch something that is 90 minutes long because there is the chance that you might not be able to use it in a program. In 90 minutes could easily watch 9 animated shorts or 6 live action shorts. So at first I was hesitant, but I had a blast! This film look at the lives of a few youngsters in the UK, Ireland, Europe, and the Untied State who’s dream is to win the world championship of Irish Dancing World Championship.  

The rest of my day was spent working through some fantastic films by French animators. There was passion, romance, chivalry, beauty, poetry, and I could go on, but it’s more fun to watch. Director Michel Ocelot films were a mixture of vintage and new.

Another programmer and I spent a bit of time arguing about the fate of the elephant in the short 7 tonnes 2

And again, the stories of love. The fleeting…

and a love that can drives us to change the world.

Tomorrow is the last day. Yikes! Better get working on my viewing list.

Chicago International Children’s Film Festival: Day 2

Day 2 of the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival has concluded, and I squeezed in 42 films. It was a mix of live-action and animation from Germany, Iran, Finland, Japan, France, Australia, India, Croatia, Vietnam, Brazil, Estonia, Taiwan, Mexico, Israel, Poland, England, and elsewhere. The international representation is one the reasons programmers from around the US, Canda, Singapore, and Australia come to this festival.

My second day of the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival has concluded, and I squeezed in 42 films. It was a mix of live-action and animation from Germany, Iran, Finland, Japan, France, Australia, India, Croatia, Vietnam, Brazil, Estonia, Taiwan, Mexico, Israel, Poland, England, and elsewhere. The international representation is one the reasons programmers from around the US, Canda, Singapore, and Australia come to this festival.

Love is in the air when it came to animation. Stories of lovers over coming obstacle and distances to be together…to varying degrees of success…

While the live action entered into the complexity of family life…

And I can’t resist giving a shout-out to the rather darker set of films I have found…

http://vimeo.com/11973471

Time is moving quickly and there is still so much to see!

Earlier: Day 1 at CICFF.

Chicago International Children’s Film Festival: Day 1

It is that time of year again when I get to cram my head full of fun movies for the upcoming year. Monday at the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival was a half dayt — only about four hours of screening — but I managed to watch 26 animated shorts.

It is that time of year again when I get to cram my head full of fun movies for the upcoming year. Monday at the Chicago International Children’s Film Festival was a half day — only about four hours of screening — but I managed to watch 26 animated shorts.

Usually when I come to the festival, I think about how to connect the films to upcoming programs and exhibitions. This year I’m really searching for how to tie a group of films together for the March Family Film Day at the Walker. The trick this year is to put together two film programs between 65 and 85 minutes long. It’s not terribly hard to think of way to group some of the films I have seen thus far: Existential Animation, Love and Death, or Post-colonial Shorts. However, they are not the easiest ways to talk about the films to the potential audience. At the same time, if I over simplify it becomes difficult as well because it can too easily be pigeon holed. Pet Capers sounds like a program for preschoolers, Nature’s Wonders sounds like a National Geographic program, and It’s About Friendship sounds like an after-school special. Good thing I have a few more days to think about it.

Here are a few highlights from the day that appealed to my adult nature.

A bit of nudity and intrigue make Bisclavret enticing, but it is has a rich visual beauty too.

This Canadian short was poetic and made me giggle.

Journey to Cape Verde was the last film I watched for the day, and I was unsure whether to cry, smile, or run out of the room and go find myself in the greater world.

I shall see what tomorrow holds.

Holding Hands with Strangers: September Free First Saturday

‘Hand over hand and heel over heel’ FFS September was a memorable day at the Walker that created unexpected ties across Minneapolis communities. Local artist Amanda Lovelee graced the Open Field with the notion that art-making, traditional dance and a photo booth with specific guidelines could encourage unlikely meetings and conversations among strangers.

By Lindsay Kaplan

Amanda Lovelee Sharing a Little Spoken Word

“Hand over hand and heel over heel” FFS September was a memorable day at the Walker that created unexpected ties across Minneapolis communities. Local artist Amanda Lovelee graced the Open Field with the notion that art-making, traditional dance and a photo booth with specific guidelines could encourage unlikely meetings and conversations among strangers. (more…)

Previous
Next