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Metahaven’s Wikileaks Fundraiser on eBay

Metahaven (the designers behind the Facestate installation in the exhibition Graphic Design: Now in Production) has created a series of WikiLeaks-inspired products to raise funds for the whistleblower group. Scarves, mugs, and t-shirts are currently on display at the Museum of the Image in Breda, The Netherlands, and is available on eBay for purchase/sniping. Installation […]

GD:NIP: Anthony Burrill Lecture

Mark your calendars! On Thursday, December 1, Anthony Burrill will lecture at the Walker. Walker Cinema, 7 pm FREE tickets are available from 6 pm at the Bazinet Garden Lobby desk.   Above, page 98 of the Graphic Design: Now in Production catalogue featuring Burrill’s posters.   Anthony Burrill is a graphic designer living and […]

Mark your calendars! On Thursday, December 1, Anthony Burrill will lecture at the Walker.

Walker Cinema, 7 pm
FREE tickets are available from 6 pm at the Bazinet Garden Lobby desk.

 

Above, page 98 of the Graphic Design: Now in Production catalogue featuring Burrill’s posters.

 

Anthony Burrill is a graphic designer living and working on the Isle of Oxney in England. He designs and prints posters that combine bold typography and strong color with a witty use of language. “Work Hard and Be Nice to People” sounds like a sensible motto, while “Oil & Water Do Not Mix,” which was screenprinted with spilled oil from the Gulf of Mexico disaster, delivers a well-deserved admonition. Burrill’s posters demonstrate a keen interest in printmaking processes such as woodblock and silkscreening. His unique approach translates well to other media, including collaborations with filmmakers and musicians on moving-image work and installations for Colette in Paris and the Design Museum in London, among others. His work has been exhibited in England, the Netherlands, France, Italy, and now in the United States in our exhibition.

 

 

POSTSCRIPT: Burrill conceives a new poster during email correspondence with Walker staff:

Hey!

i’m happy that you are happy – wait a minute, that sounds like an idea for another poster!

best wishes,
Anthony

 

GD:NIP Book Party and More Upcoming Design Events

The next few days are going to be quite busy for designers in the Twin Cities! On Monday night, join Andrew and me for a brief discussion about the ideas behind the Graphic Design: Now in Production catalogue, followed by a book signing, and then step right next door and check out the closing night […]

The next few days are going to be quite busy for designers in the Twin Cities! On Monday night, join Andrew and me for a brief discussion about the ideas behind the Graphic Design: Now in Production catalogue, followed by a book signing, and then step right next door and check out the closing night of the WOMN: Women in Minnesota Design exhibition. And before that goes down, there are three great design lectures for you to choose from (Åbäke and Dexter Sinister in the same weekend?). So here is the schedule:

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 7:30 PM, College of Visual Arts:
173 Western Avenue North, Saint Paul (across from W.A. Frost)
Graphic Design: Now in Production
book party

Join Common Good Books in welcoming Andrew Blauvelt and Emmet Byrne to a special book-signing event on Monday evening, November 14 at the College of Visual Arts in Saint Paul. Andrew is the curator of the current international design exhibition on view at the Walker Art Center and editor and co-designer of the companion catalog Graphic Design: Now in Production. Emmet Byrne is the Walker’s design director and co-designer of the catalog. Join them for a sip of wine and a brief discussion about the book and exhibition, followed by a book-signing. This event is thoughtfully and generously hosted by Common Good Books, a super charming independent bookstore at the intersection of Selby & Western. Don’t have the catalog? No worries. Books will be for sale at the event. For more information, please contact claudette@commongoodbooks.com.

 

ALSO IN THE NEXT FEW DAYS:

SUNDAY, Nov. 13, 1 PM, Minneapolis College of Art and Design:
Åbäke
lecture

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 1 PM, Minneapolis College of Art and Design:
Dexter Sinister (as represented by Stuart Bailey) lecture

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 5:30–7:00 PM, Varsity Theater:
Policy and a Pint: Can Design Change The World? 

When you hear the word “design,” you might think of iPods or I.M. Pei: artfully-conceived objects, be it architecture, gadgets, automobiles, or clothing. But can design be something that’s much more than pleasing to the senses? Can it actually serve a greater human good? That’s the question we’ll tackle at our next Policy and a Pint, presented by 89.3 The Current and The Citizens League and sponsored by Best Buy. Join us as we discuss how designers are going beyond simply making cool stuff to solving problems, filling needs, and maybe even making the world a better place. Our guests will be Bill Thorburn, CEO and Chief Design Officer at The Thorburn Group; Bernard Canniffe, Professor and Chair of Design, MCAD; and Tom Fisher, Professor of Architecture and Dean of the College of Design University of Minnesota. It’s sure to be a fascinating and fun evening, complete with the usual tasty beverages of course.

Gary Hustwit to discuss Urbanized at Walker screening

With Helvetica, director Gary Hustwit zeroed in on an iconic typeface, and with Objectified he panned out to look at the realm of industrial and product design. In a kind of Powers of Ten move of his own, his latest documentary goes macro: Urbanizedscreening Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Walker – completes his design trilogy with a look at city design.

With Helvetica, director Gary Hustwit zeroed in on an iconic typeface, and with Objectified he panned out to look at the realm of industrial and product design. In a kind of Powers of Ten move of his own, his latest documentary goes macro: Urbanizedscreening Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Walker – completes his design trilogy with a look at city design.

A global investigation into how we plan and use shared space, the film includes interviews with three dozen design thinkers, policy makers and city planners, including Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena, New York City planning director Amanda Burden, New Orleans–based artist Candy Chang, 103-year old Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer and activist Sheela Patel, who advocates for “pavement dwellers” in Mumbai, among others. Considering the context of a planet that by 2050 will have 75 percent of its residents living in cities, the film looks at mounting concerns worldwide about mobility, housing, economic development and environmental policy.

Screenings:
October 4, 6:30 pm, followed by a Q & A with Hustwit
October 4, 9:00 pm

Call for Applicants: The Walker Design Fellowship 2011-2012

Now accepting applications–Deadline: June 20, 2011 Since 1980, the Walker Art Center Design department has maintained a graphic design fellowship program that provides recent graduates (both undergrad and grad) the opportunity to work in a professional design studio environment. Selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants, fellows represent a diverse range of graphic design […]

Now accepting applications–Deadline: June 20, 2011

Since 1980, the Walker Art Center Design department has maintained a graphic design fellowship program that provides recent graduates (both undergrad and grad) the opportunity to work in a professional design studio environment. Selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants, fellows represent a diverse range of graphic design programs, such as Art Center College of Design, California College of Art, California Institute of the Arts, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Gerrit Rietveld Academie, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, NC State University, Rhode Island School of Design, Royal College of Art, Werkplaats Typografie, and Yale University, among many others.

Fellows are employed full-time for one year and are assigned a wide range of graphic design projects, from identities and related collateral for programs and exhibitions, to assisting the design director and designers with large-scale initiatives such as catalogues, campaigns, wayfinding systems, and  websites. Fellows are involved in all aspects of the design process, from conception (the “thinking”) through delivery (the “inking”), and everything in-between. Throughout the year, the studio supports and advises our fellows and the fellow inspires and energizes our studio>>>>>

>>>>Take our COMPATIBILITY TEST if you’re interested in this kind of symbiotic relationship.

Below: A small sampling of projects executed by the Walker’s design studio–including the work of 4 fellows–between the years 2008 and 2011

 

How to apply Please attach a letter of interest, a résumé with the names and contact information of three references, and a pdf portfolio containing 8–10 examples of graphic design work to design.fellowship@walkerart.org

2011/2012 Fellowship deadline: June 20, 2011

All candidates will be notified of their application status by July 31. No phone calls please.

For more information please visit the Design Fellowship page on the Walker Art Center Design website here.   Also check out the Walker Job Board.

 

Stay warm. Insights design lectures are back!

Insights, our annual graphic design lecture series, returns on Tuesday nights, starting tomorrow with Kevin Quealy and continuing during the next four weeks with Michael Hart, Julie Beeler, James Goggin, and Casey Caplow. Buy your tickets! These lectures will be webcast live and archived on the Walker Channel, where you can also view past lectures such as […]

Insights, our annual graphic design lecture series, returns on Tuesday nights, starting tomorrow with Kevin Quealy and continuing during the next four weeks with Michael Hart, Julie Beeler, James Goggin, and Casey Caplow. Buy your tickets! These lectures will be webcast live and archived on the Walker Channel, where you can also view past lectures such as Experimental Jetset, Project Projects, Irma Boom, and many many more.

 

Tuesday, March 1Kevin Quealey, New York Times Graphics Department

Quealey has created compelling information graphics for both print and online, including the interactive “You Fix the Budget” deficit and dynamic visualizations of the voting shifts in the 2010 Congressional elections, among many other works. The New York Times Graphics Department recently received the National Design Award in Communication Design. kevinquealy.com

 

Tuesday, March 8Michael Hart, Mono

After successful careers at leading ad agencies, Michael Hart, Chris Lange, and James Scott founded Minneapolis-based Mono, a firm specializing in inventive communication solutions for a variety of clients, including Herman Miller, Apple, Blu Dot, Airstream, and USA Network. Mono was named Small Agency of the Year by Advertising Age in 2010. mono-1.com

 

Tuesday, March 15: James Goggin, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

James Goggin established Practise, a London-based studio that garnered acclaim for its work with clients such as Tate Modern, Channel 4, Artangel, and the Design Museum. He was art director of the British music magazine The Wire, has served as tutor at the Werkplaats Typografie in the Netherlands and at ECAL in Switzerland, and has written for publications such as Dot, Dot, Dot. In 2010, Goggin became director of design, print, and digital media at Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art. practise.co.uk

 

Tuesday, March 22: Julie Beeler, Second Story Interactive Studio

Since 1994, Julie Beeler, cofounder of Portland, Oregon’s Second Story, has become a leading developer of unique interactive solutions for a variety of clients. Known for its technical savvy and ability to craft compelling stories into immersive experiences, Second Story has won numerous awards and critical acclaim for its interactive installations, websites, motion graphics, and three-dimensional visualizations. secondstory.com

 

Tuesday, March 29: Casey Caplowe, Good

A three-time finalist for the National Magazine Awards, Good is a diverse enterprise with a printed magazine, a web platform, and a convener of events. With the tagline, “For People Who Give a Damn,” Good has become a catalyst for more socially engaged thinking around issues of health, food, the environment, and design. The Los Angeles–based Caplowe is a cofounder of Good and serves as creative director.www.good.is

 

Wide White Space Exhibition at the Wattis Institute

We were recently invited to participate in The Way Beyond: Wide White Space, an exhibition at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco (January 20–February 5, 2011) that focuses on exhibition design, designers who curate exhibitions, and everything in between. The show is curated by Jon Sueda of Stripe SF, who is also the resident designer […]

We were recently invited to participate in The Way Beyond: Wide White Space, an exhibition at the Wattis Institute in San Francisco (January 20–February 5, 2011) that focuses on exhibition design, designers who curate exhibitions, and everything in between. The show is curated by Jon Sueda of Stripe SF, who is also the resident designer at the Wattis and teaches at CCA.

From the press release:

“Historically, galleries and museums have been fertile arenas for graphic designers to practice, whether via exhibition catalogs, exhibition design and signage, promotional materials, or interactive media. Wide White Space will focus in particular on graphic designers who create innovative identities for exhibiting institutions, forge unique collaborations with curators, and launch their own exhibition-based initiatives.

Wide White Space will also look at how designers can extend the parameters of their practice: by consciously operating within the broader context of the art world, by taking a transdisciplinary approach, by considering physical interaction within an art gallery, and by exploring time and three-dimensional space. The featured graphic designers are contemporary and historic, American and international. They have been selected because they consciously construct a narrative around their work, position themselves as authors of autonomous creative projects, and maintain a conceptually rigorous, research-based, historically fortified approach.”

I sat down with Jon to discuss his motivations behind the show, and by sat down with Jon I mean I sent him some questions by email and pasted the responses here:

1. What does the title refer to?

Wide White Space was the name of a radical art space in Antwerp Belgium that, though it existed for only a decade, came to define contemporary art in the late 1960s and early 1970s. This exhibition likewise aims to investigate the possibilities for how empty space, whether the white cube or the blank page, can be transformed into something more complex.

2. How did you select the participants?

I always mentally catalog work in this area that I’m intrigued by. Since my practice involves this very subject, I tend to visit a lot of art spaces and museums and take note of anything I find interesting. Once I analyzed the edited selection of what I thought was essential, I broke the exhibition down into three basic areas:

1. Innovative graphic identities created for arts institutions or exhibitions.

2. Work that was a result of unique collaborations with curators or artists. These projects had to transcend the typical designer/client relationship, the result being a “third thing” which neither party could have produced independently.

3. Exhibition-based initiatives launched by graphic designers.

I wanted to bring together an international view of both contemporary and historical work to tell this story. The graphic designers in the show were selected specifically because they consciously construct a narrative around their work, position themselves as authors of autonomous creative projects, and maintain a conceptually rigorous, research-based, historically fortified approach.

3. What similarities did you see between the two museums represented in the show: the Walker and the Stedelijk?

In looking at the material from both institutions side by side there are actually more similarities than I was expecting to find. Although different designers have worked on the Walker and the Stedelijk materials through the years, recent iterations of both identities seem to reflect or pay homage to their own histories, which I think is an interesting way to approach the assignment. The Walker Expanded identity (the most recent incarnation) revisits the idea of a flexible keyboard generated identity but in a totally different way than Mathew Carter’s Walker Typeface. Similarly, the Stedelijk SMCS identity by Experimental Jetset crossbreeds Crouwel’s iconic  “SM” logotype from the 60’s with the visual language of the postal-distribution building that housed the Stedelijk temporarily from 2004–2007. Although the Walker’s design team is in-house, and the Stedelijk hires independent studios, there is perhaps a shared sensitivity and respect for each institution’s history.

4. Why do you think that a (seemingly) disproportionate number of design programs are oriented towards this kind of work?

Well…considering how many opportunities there are out there to do this kind of work in the real world, maybe assignments that involve an art or exhibition context are over emphasized in design schools. On the other hand, this context is very stimulating from an education standpoint… researching the complexities, contradictions, and processes of art/artists and using design to make sense of it, is an interesting pedagogical space to navigate… at least that’s what I love about it. I also think exhibition making and graphic design are a similar activity—we often arrange or structure text and images (that we didn’t create ourselves) to tell a story… curators do this in 3-dimensional space, we do it in other formats…maybe a book, website, poster… I’m being very general here, there are many differences too, especially the standard of criticality and research in the curatorial world that is sometimes lacking in graphic design. However this is why I wanted to put together this exhibition! The graphic designers and projects selected for Wide White Space do have this critical, conceptual, and historical rigor that I think is very important.

5. How did you tackle the design of this meta exhibition, an exhibition about exhibition design?

We chose to handle this problem by creating a gallery in the exhibition that holds fragments of many different exhibitions together. Upon first entering the space, the divisions are not obvious, but in the center of the room is a long vitrine that contains all the documentation, catalogs, or gallery flyers for these exhibitions and helps to separate and contextualize each fragment.

I also invited three designers to stage exhibitions within the Wide White Space exhibition. Hansje van Halem is organizing one of her Schrank 8 exhibitions both in her home gallery in Amsterdam and the Wattis simultaneously. During the opening, Mylinh Trieu Nguyen will do a project called Ships Passing in the Night, which will be a live online distribution of an exhibition. Each piece in her show will be available for view and download for the duration of exactly 5 minutes. During the opening, we will download, print and install these works in the gallery. Finally, Daniel Eatock and Vaska have created an analog version of their Indexhibit website which invites visitors to display their own work in the exhibition.

Additionally there will be an adjunct program called Wider White Space. This will include a conversation series featuring presentations by members of our faculty here at CCA: Bob Aufuldish, Rachel Berger, Eric Heiman, Wendy Ju, MacFadden & Thorpe, Emily McVarish, Michael Vanderbyl, and Martin Venezky. Two designers will be pairing up on Tuesday and Thursday evenings during the two-week duration of the exhibition to basically build upon the context of the show itself. Each of these designers intersects the subject of the exhibition in different ways, so each evening will be focused on a specific area that stems from their interests.

Wider White Space will also be a course at CCA! Along with Jens Hoffmann and Claire Fitzsimmons (Director and Deputy Director of the Wattis respectively), I will be teaching a course this semester that extends this exhibition throughout the spring. In the course, students will select one of the designers/design groups from the exhibition and create a series of smaller solo exhibitions that will be hosted on the CCA San Francisco Campus. Right now the studios that have agreed to participate are: the Walker Art Center, Project Projects, APFEL, and Experimental Jetset. I’m very excited about this as well!

Featured designers in the exhibition: APFEL, Irma Boom, Laurenz Brunner and Julia Born, Sara De Bondt, Mevis and Van Deursen, Dexter Sinister, Indexhibit, Experimental Jetset, Will Holder, Zak Kyes, James Langdon, LUST, Niessen & de Vries, Practise, Project Projects, Yann Sérandour and Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié, Stedelijk Museum, Sulki and Min, Mylinh Trieu Nguyen, Hansje van Halem, Walker Art Center

Images, from top to bottom: Jon Sueda, Experimental Jetset, Experimental Jetset, Mevis & van Deursen, Hansje van Halem, Julia Born and Laurenz Brunner, Will Holder, Werkplaats Typografie, Fraser Muggeridge Studio, James Langdon

LoR/E, the Library of Readings & Essays—A Comprehensive Index of Keywords & Defining Subject Matters

Had I been asked, I might’ve described LoR/E, a recently developed and continually in-progress project of mine, in its earliest stages as something like an online, text-based Cabinet of Curiosity for the designer. LoR/E began and still is, much like the Cabinet of Curiosity (also known as a Wunderkammer), largely an encyclopedic collection. Only LoR/E […]

Had I been asked, I might’ve described LoR/E, a recently developed and continually in-progress project of mine, in its earliest stages as something like an online, text-based Cabinet of Curiosity for the designer.

LoR/E began and still is, much like the Cabinet of Curiosity (also known as a Wunderkammer), largely an encyclopedic collection. Only LoR/E is an indexed collection of keywords, ideas, names, places, topics, and subject matters that can be searched and/or browsed with the end goal being to discover related readings and essays. As LoR/E has begun to grow more, new ideas for the long-term have emerged, but I’m also developing, for the short-term, more refined and concrete ideas of the direction that I hope to take LoR/E as its potential is realized.


Illustrations from the book Wondertooneel der Nature depicting two of Levinus Vincent’s many large Wunderkammern (Cabinet of Curiosities) in Holland during the early 1700s

One thing that has always been apparent is that LoR/E will continue to be driven by the idea of the free sharing of knowledge and information. After all, like the definition of the word that the LoR/E acronym references, a body of knowledge on a particular subject (in the case of LoR/E, subjects mostly pertaining to certain enclaves of design, contemporary art, media, and visual culture) is inherently apt to be shared and studied. Admittedly, these subjects and their information are intended for a very niche audience. But, the fact of the matter is that much of the information that is available (and that will soon be available) within LoR/E is, otherwise, not very easy to find online. So the question has become: will LoR/E be filling a gap? Or will it only be contributing to some form of information overload?

LoR/E is not simply concerned with acquiring masses of searchable information though. One of the larger aims is that, at its height, users (especially inquisitive students of art, design, media, et al.), in having access to such an extensive index, will discover useful readings that they never knew existed or that, because the reading came from an author or publication in a discipline area different from theirs, they did not expect to discover. Of course, LoR/E can barely compare to an art/design school’s well-stocked, physical library. But, I do hope to establish a very complete, wide-ranging, and rigorously assembled repository of knowledge and information—a unique and purposeful repository which helps to expose thoughts and ideas, where certain patterns reveal themselves, as well as where relationships between varying subjects become apparent.


LoR/E allows users to view all of its entries within drop-down-menu lists where (to name just a few) searches for keywords, defining subject matters, authors, and publishers can be refined and quickly filtered (the above example shows search results for each filed reading that speaks about “authorship”)

Looking forward, in an attempt to turn LoR/E into something more than just an encyclopedic collection, I hope to convert the project into a highly functional and easily-searchable database that can exist autonomously (outside of its current home with Google Docs) on its own website. With the intent for LoR/E to become a definitive site that designers, artists, media theorists, and others can utilize as a tool for their independent or professional research, I also hope to integrate spaces that will allow for discussions to occur about the readings, authors, specific topics, etc.

Since the inception of LoR/E, I’ve also become more aware and interested in movements such as the Free Cultural Works movement. As such, I suspect that LoR/E, in its focus on the free sharing of knowledge and information, could, in addition to its function as a database, also become a site that supports and acts as a springboard for authors and independent publishers (especially in such worlds as design, contemporary art, or media) who are supportive of the Free Cultural Works mindset and who, in licensing their work under similar movements like Creative Commons or Copyleft, would like to utilize LoR/E as a means of presenting their writing by offering free PDF downloads of select texts to an audience of interested LoR/E users.

It may sound too idealist, but I hope to see LoR/E become a site that is able to accomplish a number of things. Most notably, being a site that insightfully informs those seeking specific information that cannot be found with the help of other libraries or databases (or, even with a tool like Google), that poses relevant questions to users about design, art, media, visual culture, film, et al., and that encourages any user (be they a designer, artist, writer, student) to make critical thinking and research a part of their practice.

As blogs like FormFiftyFive and Manystuff make it apparent to us almost everyday, developing formal skills seemingly demands less and less experience. Anyone who wants it can access the tools and know-how to “make something pretty.” Yet, from what I can tell, there’s not nearly enough emphasis placed on the importance of reading and personal discovery. And not just reading to be able to say that you’ve read this or that, but reading as a sincere means of building a knowledge base for oneself which will then eventually lead to one being able to more confidently create a personal ideology or a set of informed principles to work by.

Six months in, LoR/E is nearing 5,000 filed entries of keywords and defining subject matters with plans to file, at this gradual rate, thousands more.

To read more about LoR/E, the project’s impetus and primary objectives, as well as for instructions on accessing and tips for viewing LoR/E in Google Docs, visit here.

Enhance the Space of a Nonprofit Serving Homeless Youth in Minneapolis

has a to help end homelessness in Minneapolis. Help them make it a reality by giving them your vote!

has a to help end homelessness in Minneapolis.

Help them make it a reality by giving them your vote!

General Public Library at Art in General

The General Public Library is a library/reading room project located at Art in General‘s Storefront Project Space. The project opens September 16-November 13, 2010 and will be accessible as an online resource as well. To start the library, I invited designers, publishers, curators, artists, galleries, and musicians to contribute publications to the project that reflect […]

The General Public Library is a library/reading room project located at Art in General‘s Storefront Project Space. The project opens September 16-November 13, 2010 and will be accessible as an online resource as well. To start the library, I invited designers, publishers, curators, artists, galleries, and musicians to contribute publications to the project that reflect the donor’s practice, methodology, inspiration and interest. Visitors are encouraged to donate a favorite book to the library during the exhibition.

I approach the idea of a library with a focus on participation and the formation of community. In contrast to a traditional reading room–which can only be accessed for the duration of the show—the online catalogue of the General Public Library allows each visitor to browse and curate their own library within an existing and continually growing catalogue, beyond the physical installation. Each donation, as it is made, will be logged into the library cataloging system. As libraries begin to form and overlap, each book becomes a link between the book donor and other participants in the library. Inversely, when viewing one book, it is possible to see the interests of other participants.

Throughout the course of the exhibition, as visitors create their own selection of favorite books, the library will filter all donations into a catalog of the top 200 most popular books. These books will be added to the General Public Library permanent collection after the duration of the project.

Contributing participants include Art Metropole, aaaarg.org, Ooga Booga, Fillip, Printed Matter, Nieves, 2nd Cannons Publications, Capricious, Hassla, Golden Age, Medium Rare, Oslo Editions, Gottlund Verlag, Eastside Projects, Bedford Press, Stripe SF, New Jerseyy, Matt Keegan, North Drive Press, Project Projects, split/fountain, STUPENDOUS, The Holster, Bart de Baets, Andreas Banderas, Christian Brandt, Task Newsletter, Robin Cameron, Dante Carlos, ETCAMA, For Further Information, Espen Friberg and Aslak Gurholt Rønsen, GRAPHIC, David Horvitz, Marie Jager, Kingsboro Press, Zak Kyes, Lucky Dragons, Manystuff, Jennilee Marigomen, Miniature Garden, Radim Pesko, Laurel Ptak, Rollo Press, Peter Sutherland, Swill Children, Vance Wellenstein, Jessica Williams and YOU.

The General Public Library website, www.generalpubliclibrary.info, is based on Yours Mine Ours, a shared library designed and developed by Brian Watterson, Hank Huang and Zak Klauck. www.yoursmineours.net

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