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Tell us a story about your suburb

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jD2Us5GFb4[/youtube] Do you live in a suburb? Do you work or go to school in one? What is your experience of the “burbs?” Whether you love them or hate them we’re interested in your thoughts on the phenomenon of the American suburb. We invite you to make a 5-minute video about strip malls, cul-de-sacs, office […]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_jD2Us5GFb4[/youtube]

Do you live in a suburb?

Do you work or go to school in one?

What is your experience of the “burbs?”

Whether you love them or hate them we’re interested in your thoughts on the phenomenon of the American suburb. We invite you to make a 5-minute video about strip malls, cul-de-sacs, office parks, and green lawns or whatever suburbia means to you. A select number of videos will be chosen to screen as part of the exhibition Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes in the Target Gallery from February 15 to May 18, 2008.

To participate, upload your video to YouTube and add the tag “walkerworldsaway” or post it as a response to our video above. We’ll feature all videos on the Walker’s YouTube page. To be considered for gallery screening, entries must be 5 minutes or less and be online by January 18, 2008.

Design Director and Curator Andrew Blauvelt will be selecting the videos to screen in the gallery. We’ll contact selectees via YouTube to notify them and follow up for any additional contact information.

If you have any questions, email witt(dot)siasoco(at)walkerart(dot)org.

P.S. Thanks to Witt and Brent for helping to create this video. Brent knows a lot of things about Maple Grove.

  • William says:

    The main reason the suburb’s exist, was to provide a form of civilized urban expansion to wide-open sky, fresh air, large parcels’ of land for the home structure. Some of the first suburb’s in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro; such as Edina, Golden Valley, St. Louis Park, and a few more, were so well designed by professional land engineer’s that the environment actually produced a much more positive acknowledgement of urban habitat in general!

    The escape from the depth’s of the inner-city problem’s of serious crime, noise pollution, bio-hazard, lack of green, really changed my life. And I was a child in a stately 3-story home by the art institute in the early 1950’s…but that is exactly when the city of Minneapolis and other large cities in America began to change, away from it’s pristine environment for raising families, that it had built a reputation for, towards the problem demographics/statistics, that it has today.

    A quality suburban layout has nothing to do with mega-stores and shopping centers. It has everything to do with well-designed residential space. And the artist’s so far in their video attempts have so totally missed this point! It is about standing in a large yard sensing the 4-winds, seeing and touching 180-degrees of blue sky, visually noticing wild life and natural streams, river and creek water. I have all of this. And the artistic appreciation in my life is so much fuller as a result of this.

    Because of condensed population in Minneapolis after and just before world war 2, some turned towards the west and made their great escape. Building a better life.

  • Janelle Marble says:

    I moved to Illinois from western new york about 6-8 months ago

    The absurdity of the suburb is a daily occurence for me and for my fiance we often go by and say to each other I just don’t get it.

    In october we took my son to a pumkin patch with animals and the whole bit as we went on our tractor ride I started laughing and taking pictures just beyond this patch of land (corn stalks)it was surrounded about 270 degrees by tracts of houses coming from a place where this is not the norm I was awestruck by the sight.

  • michele says:

    I grew up in a Levitt development. It was a perfect place to grow up. Each home was the same size, with the same amount of property, there were several different styles so thye all didn’t look completely alike.

    There were sidewalks to ride your bikes on or push a baby carriage, or walk a dog, or roller skate. Everyone knew all the kids in the immediate area and kept an eye on each other and many people did not lock their doors. I was born in the late 50’s. We were several blocks walking distance from food shopping, a swimming pool, the two neighborhood schools and pizza, ice cream and playgrounds. My house was a perfect size for a family of five, one full bathroom, three bedrooms and one half bathroom so we all had to wait to shower, not big deal we survived.

    We were always out on the lawn, or playing tag and red rover in the spring and summer in the streets as well as hopscotch and potsie, popping tar bubbles in the summer was great fun. Everyone knew the neighborhood dogs too and saved bones and leftovers. People knock suburbs but for kids, it is a great place to grow up. I currently reside in a townhouse developement in a suburb, there are no sidewalks, my kids can’t ride their bikes without fear of being hit by the endless stream of cars driving in and out. It is still nice because we are attached on both sides and know our neighbors well. Suburbs rock !!!!