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Warhol TV

As the Walker book buyer for the last eight years, I routinely come across unusual titles. I thought it would be interesting to blog these notable discoveries as I see them.  Typically, I’m attracted to quirky material and seek out books that just haven’t been conceived before.  During some recent scouting around for new titles […]

As the Walker book buyer for the last eight years, I routinely come across unusual titles. I thought it would be interesting to blog these notable discoveries as I see them.  Typically, I’m attracted to quirky material and seek out books that just haven’t been conceived before.  During some recent scouting around for new titles for the shop, I came across one such incomparable volume.  Warhol TV is a magazine-like publication that documents the exhibition of the same name held last winter at La Maison Rouge in Paris.  Even with the countless exhibition catalogues and books devoted to Andy Warhol—some of which home in on just his fashion drawings, portraits of Jews, or motion pictures—there hasn’t been a book, until now, on his role with television.

As the father of artistic and social promotion, Andy Warhol used every means of communication to self-promote his reality.  Photography, film, magazine, and paintings were employed to document and showcase his surroundings and the creative social scene.  Turns out that Warhol also wasn’t shy about tapping into television, which only seems natural given its mass appeal and accessibility.  It was the ultimate contemporary tool, a perfect platform for exposing his reality.  Andy Warhol utilized all avenues of the medium from as early as 1964, when he made an imitation Soap Opera, to his guest appearance on Love Boat, in 1985. He was also an early adopter with cable, creating a program back in 1979 on the newly formed New York Cable Network, and his MTV show in 1985, Andy Warhol’s Fifteen Minutes.

Warhol TV focuses on the artist’s involvement with television and the beautiful talent who were a part of his world.  Marc Jacobs, Tama Janowitz, Kenny Scharf, Glenn O’Brian, and Brigid Berlin are just a few who recall their encounters with Warhol and TV.  The most interesting feature in the book, besides the rare images, is Warhol’s television filmography listing episodes with such guests as Debbie Harry, Courtney Love, Steven Spielberg, Moon Zappa, Cindy Sherman and Pee Wee Herman.  I can only imagine Andy’s relaxed, subtle reaction to the energetic Pee Wee.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V69IJ962Q4g

 

Purchase Warhol TV at the Walker Shop.

Weekend press check

Here are a couple features/reviews from over the weekend to prime your mind and grease your wheels for artists on the Walker horizon: New York Times review of the new CD from Drew Gress, who brings his 7 Black Butterflies combo March 28, co-headlining with the Prezens Quartet. NPR’s Fresh Air featured Czech filmmaker Milos […]

Here are a couple features/reviews from over the weekend to prime your mind and grease your wheels for artists on the Walker horizon:

prezens.jpgNew York Times review of the new CD from Drew Gress, who brings his 7 Black Butterflies combo March 28, co-headlining with the Prezens Quartet.

NPR’s Fresh Air featured Czech filmmaker Milos Forman, the focus of our Regis Dialogue and Retrospective in April. Forman is here April 12 for a public discussion about his career with LA WEEKLY film critic Scott Foundas.

Washington on Walker at the Whitney

The Washington Post’s Robin Givhan comments on the Walker’s Kara Walker exhibition My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love, currently at the Whitney museum in New York. Givhan does an excellent job putting Kara Walker in the context of recent events.

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The Washington Post’s Robin Givhan comments on the Walker’s Kara Walker exhibition My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love, currently at the Whitney museum in New York. Givhan does an excellent job putting Kara Walker in the context of recent events.

Fresh Prince

The New Yorker has reviewed Richard Prince’s retrospective at the Guggenheim, which comes to the Walker in March 2008. (For some reason, the review is dated Oct. 15 — three days from now.) In calling the show “seductive,” Peter Schjeldahl, the magazine’s art critic, says this: “If ‘quintessential artist in a generation’ were a job […]

The New Yorker has reviewed Richard Prince’s retrospective at the Guggenheim, which comes to the Walker in March 2008. (For some reason, the review is dated Oct. 15 — three days from now.) In calling the show “seductive,” Peter Schjeldahl, the magazine’s art critic, says this: “If ‘quintessential artist in a generation’ were a job opening, Prince … would be an inevitable hire.”

Doesn’t sound like much of an EOE policy to me. I’m wondering where Schjeldahl is placing these generational boundaries. You’d certainly be hard-pressed to find a more eclectic artist. The show spans photography, painting, sculpture, illustration, installation, text pieces, pop art, abstractions — all with several incarnations.

Inevitability notwithstanding, I can think of a few names at least deserving peeks at the phantom job listing. Any suggestions on others who should apply?

Reviews: Ordinary Culture

Rodney McMillian’s Words Are Deeds features a Wittgenstein quote affixed to a gallery window In today’s Star Tribune, Mary Abbe says Ordinary Culture: Heikes/Helms/McMillian has “a surprising visual harmony and psychological coherence,” but what’s most interesting about her review is hearing curator Doryun Chong and two of the exhibition artists speak on themes in the […]

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Rodney McMillian’s Words Are Deeds features a Wittgenstein quote affixed to a gallery window

In today’s Star Tribune, Mary Abbe says Ordinary Culture: Heikes/Helms/McMillian has “a surprising visual harmony and psychological coherence,” but what’s most interesting about her review is hearing curator Doryun Chong and two of the exhibition artists speak on themes in the show.

Chong:

When I was scanning the field, I realized there was this zeitgeist of anxiety and anguish, which I think is natural, in this country. We’re living in wartime and have all these issues about invasion of privacy. I think Americans’ certitude about their own culture and beliefs is being shaken right now. So I was thinking about how that was reflected in the work and how artists are reconciling this culture we’re living in with their own practice, methodology and lexicon.

Rodney McMillian on his video piece, where he appears, clean-shaven and in a suit a la Barak Obama, to give Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society”/”war on poverty” speech:

It’s beautifully written and very lyrical and it speaks about national desires and how communities can be created. Poverty today is mostly talked about as a pathology as opposed to something that society could address and change. So much was going on in the world then — the Cold War, the confrontation with Cuba, the civil rights movement and post-colonial changes — and I’m curious about those ideas in that context and what history does to our perspective.

In its review, “Warfare in the Suburbs,” The Minnesota Daily writes of the exhibition:

Like jumbled, mismatched piles of junk at your typical garage sale, they evoke obscure American allegories via the display of things once prized and now discarded. When such a vast term like culture is dragged into the light and scrutinized, dichotomies arise and different angles and perspectives flourish. Even things as omnipresent as running jokes and insurgent masks on the news become oddities at a second glance.

Walker shows on tour:

Kiki Smith: A Gathering, 1980-2005 at Contemporary Arts Museum Houston (through 9/24):

Newsweek: “Mortality, Morbidity, and More

Houston Chronicle: “A Gathering presents a look at 25 years of Kiki Smith

ANDY WARHOL/SUPERNOVA: Stars, Deaths and Disasters, 1962–1964 at AGO (guest-curated by David Cronenberg, through 10/22):

Globe and Mail: “Lips, tongues and making out … at the art museum

Huang Yong Ping: “A star of elusive luminosity.”

House of Oracles installed at MASSMoCA Holland Cotter’s New York Times‘ review of the Walker’s Huang Yong Ping show, now on view at MASSMoCA, puts into words what I couldn’t about the show–the almost archeological timelessness of the work, the restive diversity of Huang’s themes and media, and an apparent disinterest in themes and styles […]

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House of Oracles installed at MASSMoCA

Holland Cotter’s New York Timesreview of the Walker’s Huang Yong Ping show, now on view at MASSMoCA, puts into words what I couldn’t about the show–the almost archeological timelessness of the work, the restive diversity of Huang’s themes and media, and an apparent disinterest in themes and styles that are driving much of the art market’s current fondness for Chinese contemporary art. Two snippets:

It has a complicated sense of newness: you have never seen anything quite like this art before, yet it feels musty and archaic, as if excavated from tombs. And unlike his earlier work, it carries a dense, particular content of stories, myths, esoteric lore and political commentary.

. . . . . . .

[H]is art is very different from what topped the charts at Sotheby’s: post-Maoist Pop paintings that adhere to Western formal preferences and to an ideological view of China still locked in cold war formulas.Most of the painters whose work sold at auction have been producing the same images for 20 years. Mr. Huang, restlessly moving among themes and forms, has not. His art is about change, and it changes, and changes again. Duchamp and Cage, those adepts of Taoist modernism, would surely have understood this. And they might have recognized Mr. Huang for what he is: not one of the crouching tigers of the new Chinese art, but one of its hidden dragons.

Check out the visual arts blog for behind-the-scenes glimpses of this Walker exhibition.

Also in the Times: Carol Vogel writes on our new collaboration with the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. A favorite from the Walker collection, Franz Marc’s The Large Blue Horses (1911), will go on long-term loan (along with the Rudolf Belling sculpture Kopf In Messing (Head in Brass) and West African masks and pre-Columbian artifacts from T.B. Walker’s collection) to the MIA, just in time for display in the inaugural installation of their new Michael Graves-designed expansion. In exchange, we’ll borrow select drawings for a 2007 exhibition.

“Our public doesn’t care who owns things,” says Walker director Kathy Halbreich. “They just want the experience of seeing them.”