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Gather by D’Amico’s Chef Josh Brown: best tastes of late summer

Coming on the heels of two new reviews for Gather (City Pages, Star Tribune),  this story was originally published in the September/October issue of Walker magazine; it’s accompanied by a recipe for chef Josh Brown’s raw-and-cooked vegetable salad. Besides the not-inconsiderable task of presiding over Gather by D’Amico, the Walker’s new restaurant that launched in June, chef Josh Brown […]

Coming on the heels of two new reviews for Gather (City PagesStar Tribune),  this story was originally published in the September/October issue of Walker magazine; it’s accompanied by a recipe for chef Josh Brown’s raw-and-cooked vegetable salad.

Besides the not-inconsiderable task of presiding over Gather by D’Amico, the Walker’s new restaurant that launched in June, chef Josh Brown has been tending a new vegetable plot at home—his first of any size since he was a kid in rural Montana. “Watching everything growing has definitely been a source of inspiration for Gather,” he says.

Recently he sat down to talk seasonal food and look toward the summer transition into fall. For Brown, tomatoes are “one last end-of-summer hurrah” that, as he points out, can be had until early October. Rather than fuss with this fruit, he prefers to let its sweetness stand out: “I just eat them with salt, pepper, and olive oil, or I make my wife’s favorite dish: pasta with fresh tomatoes, basil, olive oil, garlic, and parmesan. Of course, it only works with excellent tomatoes.” Leeks, another late-summer favorite that the chef enjoys braising and pairing with swordfish, also become available in late summer. As greens like chard and kale come into their own, he uses a simple preparation he picked up from a fellow cook: “Add salt and a pat of butter to boiling water before blanching your greens—the butter sticks to them and they’re delicious served with chicken or beef.”

Given the locally sourced and seasonal focus of Gather, Brown develops new dishes monthly as certain ingredients reach their peak. But the raw and cooked salad endures on the menu—not just because it’s one of his personal favorites, but because its components change depending on what’s freshest. “As summer ends, we’ll be trading out the beans and asparagus, probably with Brussels sprouts and a root vegetable,” he says.

As these items come into season, Brown turns on the oven. “Parsnips, turnips, kohlrabi, beets, and the like are really good as a hash, diced up small and slowroasted,” he says. Kohlrabi in particular, a lesser-known member of the cabbage family, takes him instantly back to that large garden of his childhood. “It has always stood out in my mind—something about the way it grows, watching my mother and grandmother picking it. Food sparks so many vivid memories for me; it’s one of the reasons I love cooking.”

Josh Brown’s Raw & Cooked Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette
Serves 2. As Brown notes, this salad can change based on what’s in season, so swap out and add in vegetables — the key is freshness. 

3      sliced asparagus spears, lightly blanched
3 oz   fennel and fennel fronds
2 oz      sliced radish
3 oz   sliced haricot vert, lightly blanched
1 oz    Hong Kong scallion
lemon vinaigrette (see below)
1 oz    ricotta salata
6 slices     soft boiled egg (see below)

Eggs: Cover eggs in cold water in a saucepan; bring to a boil and turn the heat off. Let stand for 7 minutes, then put eggs into an ice bath.

Lemon vinaigrette (makes extra)
1/2 c.      lemon juice
1T        lemon zest
1T       Dijon mustard
2T        minced shallot
1C       extra-virgin olive oil
3T        chopped basil

Mix lemon, zest,Dijon, and shallot in a bowl; whisk in the olive oil, then add basil and season with salt and pepper.

Plate set up: Salt and pepper the eggs and place in triangles on two plates. Toss all vegetables with vinaigrette and place on the plates; top with ricotta salata.

 

 

Expanding Access

In July 2009, the Walker Art Center celebrated the first of two years of funding from the MetLife Foundation for its Open Door Accessibility Initiative. The goal of the initiative is to be inclusive as possible when offering guided tours of our galleries and hands-on art-making experiences.  For this grant, our core audiences are people […]

full group-Irwin

In July 2009, the Walker Art Center celebrated the first of two years of funding from the MetLife Foundation for its Open Door Accessibility Initiative. The goal of the initiative is to be inclusive as possible when offering guided tours of our galleries and hands-on art-making experiences.  For this grant, our core audiences are people who are blind, people who are deaf, and people who have cognitive disabilities, including those living with Alzheimer’s and dementia.  Existing access programs include:

  • Contemporary Journeys, tours and art-making for people with Alzheimer’s and their care partners
  • Touch Tours of the Walker collection (exploring objects through touch).
  • Verbal Description Tours, using descriptive language to convey visual details (also included in Touch Tours).
  • Multi-Sensory Tours, incorporating various props to allow visitors different points of entry to access artworks.
  • Large Print Exhibition Labels, available at the lobby desks.
  • Assisted Listening Devices for tours and events in the Cinema and McGuire Theater.
  • Qualified ASL interpretation upon request (four week’s notice required for tours and art labs, two week’s notice for Cinema and McGuire Theater events). 

We are also developing accommodations for these communities including: a Braille version of our visitor guide, tactile diagrams of select pieces in the Walker collection, new and more user friendly gallery stools and folding chairs, and a selection of audio described programs.

Members of local non-profit, arts, education, and disability communities along with Walker staff and volunteers have come together to form an access advisory group.  On January 12, our group met to discuss access initiatives at the museum.  We gathered in the Friedman Gallery, the site of Robert Irwin’s immersive installation Slant, Light, Volume.  It was important to meet and discuss accessibility in the context of a gallery, exactly where we intend to expand access.  As some of the members of the group are blind or have low vision, we began with a detailed verbal description of the installation.  A sign language interpreter was also on staff.

This was our first group meeting, so introductions came next, along with testimonials from people about memorable experiences with art museums.  This discussion was important in highlighting some of the individual needs and interests we are trying to address in the access initiative as well as the challenges we face.  The diversity of the group guarantees vibrant and broad discussions.

We continued by examining the grant goals and scope and existing programs, listed above.  We also mapped out future meetings and determined some essential details to be considered in our initiative, including:

  • Creating a welcoming environment
  • How to market our accessibility programming to the community
  • Where to turn attention for future funding

More info is to come.  Do you have suggestions on how the Walker can make the museum more accessible?  We’re listening!  Please post below.  Any questions or concerns you may have regarding accessibility may be directed to access@walkerart.org, or call the access line at 612.375.7564.  Coming next: an introduction to your accessibility group!

Eno Gets Freaky

In anticipation of the sold out Brian Eno and Jon Hassell conversation on Sept 22, here is a gem for your pleasure.  Eno performs here with legendary Roxy Music in the early 70’s, freaking out on tambourine and, er, keyboard?  Here he is rocking his crucially dangerous “vampire peacock” look.  Check out that skullet! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3UODv3aCVxg Also, here’s one […]

ArtShare brings Walker collection to Facebook

The Walker has joined the growing number of institutions participating in ArtShare, the Brooklyn Museum’s art sharing application on Facebook. The team at Brooklyn launched ArtShare in November 2007, and the response was immediately positive. By adding this app Facebook users are able to rotate works of art on their profile, showing their favorites or […]

artshare2.pngThe Walker has joined the growing number of institutions participating in ArtShare, the Brooklyn Museum’s art sharing application on Facebook. The team at Brooklyn launched ArtShare in November 2007, and the response was immediately positive. By adding this app Facebook users are able to rotate works of art on their profile, showing their favorites or just items that pique their interest. The app even works with Facebook Pages, and has been added to the Walker’s page here. (Like the Walker? Become a fan of our page!)

If you’re a Facebook user, give ArtShare a try and let us know what you think!

A big thanks to Shelley and Michael for making the application so open and also for working with other institutions to bring everyone online – they were responding to inquiries from us on day one and ready to help integrate our collection.

BORING & NON-OFFENSIVE

These remind me of the boring & non-offensive awesome WACTAC t-shirt. MORE: Retro Kid & Retro Teen pools on flickr Your Children’s Manners by Rhoda W. Bacmeister, 1952. Illustrated by Janet LaSalle. When Children Start Dating by Edith G. Neisser, 1951. Illustrated by Janet LaSalle. [source: wardomatic’s photoset on flickr]

Artist videos: Song Dong, Holzer, Minter, Forsythe

Creative Time‘s new video site has some great little videos featuring artists they fund: Marilyn Minter on her Whitney Biennial billboards, Song Dong marking time with water and a brush on the sidewalks of New York, Jenny Holzer discussing last year’s project For the City, an interview with choreographer William Forsythe, and more.

Future Feeder

I don’t know who this guy is. He doesn’t say much about himself. Nobody’s ever told me anything about him. But man, he can blog like nobody’s business. I think maybe he lives about seven months in the future and is posting via time-machine. http://www.futurefeeder.com/

I don’t know who this guy is. He doesn’t say much about himself.
Nobody’s ever told me anything about him.

But man, he can blog like nobody’s business. I think maybe he
lives about seven months in the future and is posting via
time-machine.

http://www.futurefeeder.com/

Rhizome.org

People who websurf constantly and like art sites would likely like this well-established techie art site. http://rhizome.org As for me, I’m liking this Regine Debatty site. Man she’s good. The first time I came across “we-make-money-not-art” I thought that Regine had to be at least 30 or 40 people. http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/

People who websurf constantly and like art sites would likely like
this well-established techie art site.

http://rhizome.org

As for me, I’m liking this Regine Debatty site. Man she’s good.
The first time I came across “we-make-money-not-art” I thought
that Regine had to be at least 30 or 40 people.

http://www.we-make-money-not-art.com/

We should, like, totally be MySpace friends

The Walker Art Center is now on MySpace. To view our page, click here. Add us to your friends to get ticket discounts, special giveaways, and advanced notice on high demand events.

The Walker Art Center is now on MySpace. To view our page, click here. Add us to your friends to get ticket discounts, special giveaways, and advanced notice on high demand events.