Blogs Centerpoints New Media Art

The Stadium Project

I had the privilege of visiting MCAD this weekend and was able to take in Everything Under the Sun, the faculty show. The show is, as always, a diverse group of work, reflecting the diverse group of faculty there. Being a new media guy, I immediately was drawn to Piotr Szyhalski’s The Stadium Project. Szyhalski […]

I had the privilege of visiting MCAD this weekend and was able to take in Everything Under the Sun, the faculty show. The show is, as always, a diverse group of work, reflecting the diverse group of faculty there. Being a new media guy, I immediately was drawn to Piotr Szyhalski’s The Stadium Project. Szyhalski is co-creator of the Dolphin Oracle II, featured in the Walker Arcade, and a number of pieces in gallery 9. The premise of the piece is simple: visitors view and create messages with the digital version of boards that would be held overhead during sporting events to create a large message. In essence, it is a pixel based display, but with a distinct sense of grandiose scale.

Click for videoThe simplicity of the piece lies in its ease of use. The only interface is a mouse; when you create your message, you change tiles from black to white by clicking on them. The animation between scenes is designed to look as close to possible to a real stadium tile display. The open-endedness of the piece is also cause for fascination. Like anonymous bloggers or graffiti artists, people seem to be drawn to leaving messages for other individuals they will never meet. Certainly it is difficult to communicate anything profound in the space of 527 pixels, but the act of doing it and the way it is presented is just as important as the message itself. Like Dolphin Oracle II participating in The Stadium Project is just fun to do. While I was looking at the show, I saw quite a range of children to adults creating and viewing messages. Piotr was nice enough to send me his statement about the project, so I’ve posted that in the extended post.

Tiles in motion Close up of screen

p.s. Sorry about the shaky video. It seems I am always without a tripod.

Read the rest for Szyhalski’s statement…

(more…)

Video: Ben Rubin’s light sculpture

Here’s some wobbly footage of Ben Rubin’s light sculpture I’ve mentioned before. Installed on the elevators at the Cesar Pelli-designed Minneapolis Central Library, this “giant reading machine” scrolls cursor-style through titles of books in the library’s collection. And here’s how it looks from inside the elevator:

Here’s some wobbly footage of Ben Rubin’s light sculpture I’ve mentioned before. Installed on the elevators at the Cesar Pelli-designed Minneapolis Central Library, this “giant reading machine” scrolls cursor-style through titles of books in the library’s collection.

And here’s how it looks from inside the elevator:

Natalie Jeremijenko goes to the Ooz.

Robot geese, toilets for birds, luxury housing for bats: in her new series of experiments, artist and activist Natalie Jeremijenko explores the human/animal interface. These and other projects will fall under the aegis of Ooz (“zoo” spelled backward), a corporation Jeremijenko will form. A defining difference between this and other corporations: this one will have […]

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Robot geese, toilets for birds, luxury housing for bats: in her new series of experiments, artist and activist Natalie Jeremijenko explores the human/animal interface. These and other projects will fall under the aegis of Ooz (“zoo” spelled backward), a corporation Jeremijenko will form. A defining difference between this and other corporations: this one will have Hudson River fish on its board. The logic behind this hinges on an 1886 Supreme Court decision, Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad, which granted corporations the same rights and legal protections as people–i.e.”corporate personhood.” With fish as corporate shareholders, they can have a stake in their increasingly polluted habitat. An excellent Salon profile describes some of her work:

She cracks open her laptop and displays an image of 100 polycarbonate tubes or “buoys” that she’s engineered to glow when fish swim through them in the Hudson River. Yes, she really has government approval to position the buoys in the river. Given her day job as a professor, she convinced state environmental officials her project was all about science. But never mind that. Did you know the fish were on Zoloft? All the antidepressants that New Yorkers take are flushed through their urine into sewage treatment plants, which overflow into the river. You doubt her? Go to the Whitney Museum and see one of her drawings hanging on a wall by a bathroom. It features a woman’s bottom, her pants below her knees, on a toilet seat. It asks, “Why are the Hudson River fish and frogs on antidepressants?” Printed on it in tiny letters are actual studies that attest to the chemical drug compounds in the waterway consumed by the unsuspecting bass, sturgeon and crabs.

Anyway, when the buoys light up, you can feed the fish food treated with chelating agents to help cleanse the PCBs from their blood, planted there from decades of General Electric dumping waste into the river. The fish food, in fact, will not be much different from the energy bars we’re always eating on hiking trails. “The idea that we eat the same stuff is a visceral demonstration that we live in the same system,” Jeremijenko says. “Eating together is the most intimate form of kinship. By scripting a work where we share the same kind of food with fish, I’m scripting our interrelationship with them.”

For more on Jeremijenko, visit the Bureau of Inverse Technology, her art collective.

Life battles.

Featured on Rhizome, Life vs. Life is an online adaptation of ’70s mathematician John Conway’s classic game Life. Created by Walker New Media designer Eric Ishii Eckhardt and Justin Bakse, it’s a “cellular automata” game that presents players with a grid of cells that are either on (live) or off (dead), just like Conway’s, but […]

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Featured on Rhizome, Life vs. Life is an online adaptation of ’70s mathematician John Conway’s classic game Life. Created by Walker New Media designer Eric Ishii Eckhardt and Justin Bakse, it’s a “cellular automata” game that presents players with a grid of cells that are either on (live) or off (dead), just like Conway’s, but this game has two players facing off on arena-style boards. The pair writes:

In this game we have transformed a harmonious solitary activity into an asynchronous competitive experience. A player creates a pattern which evolves through successive generations. When two patterns are placed opposite each other they do “ battle” over successive generations until one side emerges victorious. We have complemented the battles storing the results and displaying them publicly. The resulting game is a player driven natural selection of cellular autonoma shapes.

Swedish design/designing the future

Two fascinating local events for designers, artists, and thinkers: Fresh off its Year of Design (2005), Sweden is sending one of its top design cheerleaders to Minnesota. Ewa Kumlin, director of the Svensk Form (the Swedish Society of Crafts and Design), will speak at Minneapolis’ American Swedish Institute at a lunch talk on May 1. […]

Two fascinating local events for designers, artists, and thinkers:

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Fresh off its Year of Design (2005), Sweden is sending one of its top design cheerleaders to Minnesota. Ewa Kumlin, director of the Svensk Form (the Swedish Society of Crafts and Design), will speak at Minneapolis’ American Swedish Institute at a lunch talk on May 1. Entitled “Year of Design in Sweden: Trends and Leaders,” her illustrated discussion will address the YOD campaign and Scandinavian design.

The annual PUSH conference, highlighting “people who are working at the center of discovery and guiding the way to what comes next,” comes to the Walker June 11–13. The midwest’s answer to TED, the conference aims to address “reality, its virtual variations, genetics, politics, biological miracles, ethics, emerging forms of social organization, and the questions such change raises for us all.” Speakers include: Julian Dibbel, WIRED contributing editor and author on digital culture; Ze Frank, performance artist and creator of the viral email “How to Dance Properly“; Chinese new-media artist, Feng Mengbo; SmartMobs author Howard Rheingold; keynote speaker Cameron Sinclair, founder of Architecture for Humanity; and many others. I’ll be live-blogging the event here at Off-Center.

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Cory Arcangel Interviewed

Paddy Johnson interviewed Cory Arcangel for Fanzine a few days ago. It’s an entertaining read about a big name in the field of software/hardware art hacks.

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Paddy Johnson interviewed Cory Arcangel for Fanzine a few days ago. It’s an entertaining read about a big name in the field of software/hardware art hacks.

RSS Jockey’s Looking for Feeds

RSS Jockey mixes (by hand) RSS Feeds, with some surprising results. They sent a call out on the Rhizome list yesterday “LOOKING FOR RSS FEEDZ WITH ACIDIC VIDEO LOOPING, MASSIV SOUND SCAPING, FLASH BANGIN SCRIPT, AND TEXT SPLITTING CONTENT.” So if you’ve got one of those feeds handy send it to RSSJ@RSSJOCKEY.COM

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RSS Jockey mixes (by hand) RSS Feeds, with some surprising results. They sent a call out on the Rhizome list yesterday “LOOKING FOR RSS FEEDZ WITH ACIDIC VIDEO LOOPING, MASSIV SOUND SCAPING, FLASH BANGIN SCRIPT, AND TEXT SPLITTING CONTENT.”

So if you’ve got one of those feeds handy send it to RSSJ@RSSJOCKEY.COM

Ten-sided, a textual performance

Billed as a textual performance, otherwise known as a blog, Ten-sided is Turbulence.org’s latest commission. The blog features 10 authors who adopt fictional personalities which develop over time in response to each others public posts. The resulting improvisation resembles a jazz performance or a session of exquisite corpse, but in a new form of creative […]

Billed as a textual performance, otherwise known as a blog, Ten-sided is Turbulence.org’s latest commission. The blog features 10 authors who adopt fictional personalities which develop over time in response to each others public posts.

The resulting improvisation resembles a jazz performance or a session of exquisite corpse, but in a new form of creative practice that comments on and employs the multi-vocal nature of blogging communities.

There is more complete information on Rhizome. It looks like blogs for invented characters are “in” this year, maybe Toni was on to something.

Reclaim the Spectrum

Reclaim the Spectrum, an exhibition at Zemos98 Audiovisual Festival (March 14–18 in Seville), features an array of artists who map and make visible the electromagnetic spectrum we use for today’s wireless devices, from cellphones to wifi networks. The show features artists like Anab Jain (above), who, upon discovering that neighbors were poaching her wireless internet […]

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Reclaim the Spectrum, an exhibition at Zemos98 Audiovisual Festival (March 14–18 in Seville), features an array of artists who map and make visible the electromagnetic spectrum we use for today’s wireless devices, from cellphones to wifi networks. The show features artists like Anab Jain (above), who, upon discovering that neighbors were poaching her wireless internet connection, set up a yellow chair on the sidewalk to create a free, communal, and in-person experiment with connectivity. Michelle Teran‘s video installation documents a walk through the city with a portable frequency scanner, intercepting and “microcasting” the footage she captures from wireless video cameras in the area. From moving images recorded at ATMs and bank lobbies, to security cameras in a baby’s nursery, her project seems to suggest that, in the wireless age, privacy is a thing of the past.

Swarm

The Swarm exhibition at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philidelphia juxtaposes new media generative artists with well known contemporary artists. Featured in the show are some artists with connections to the Walker including Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze and Matthew Ritchie who are in the exhibition with less established artists Casey Reas and Jason Salavon. […]

The Swarm exhibition at the Fabric Workshop and Museum in Philidelphia juxtaposes new media generative artists with well known contemporary artists. Featured in the show are some artists with connections to the Walker including Julie Mehretu, Sarah Sze and Matthew Ritchie who are in the exhibition with less established artists Casey Reas and Jason Salavon. I found the Walker’s site had rich information about several of the artist featured in the Swarm exhibition.

Julie Mehretu

Mehretu’s collaboration with entropy8zuper! was featured in the exhibition How Latitudes Become Forms and is currently hosted by the Walker. In 2003 the Walker showed Julie Mehretu: Drawing Into Painting. It looks like the catalog is still available as well.There are also three segments of an opening day talk featuring the artist available through Art on Call. (1, 2, 3)

Sarah Sze

Grow or Die was a 2002 commission for the Cowles conservatory. The Art on Call page has two files where the artist describes Grow or Die ( 1, 2).

Matthew Ritchie

Ritchie’s project The Hard Way hosted by the Walker as part of da’web, there is more info on the Walker’s Collections and Resources page.

source:Generator.X

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