Blogs Centerpoints Links

Updates (and a bit of good news) on Ai Weiwei’s detention

    The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum have been diligently tracking press coverage since artist Ai Weiwei was detained on April 3. Among the latest news links they’re circulating is an AFP article, included in today’s online edition of Le Figaro as well as many other publications, reporting that Ai Weiwei […]

 

Ai Weiwei, in photos taken on June 30, 2009 in China

 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum have been diligently tracking press coverage since artist Ai Weiwei was detained on April 3.

Among the latest news links they’re circulating is an AFP article, included in today’s online edition of Le Figaro as well as many other publications, reporting that Ai Weiwei has been able to see his wife. The Guggenheim petition to release Ai Weiwei is mentioned at the end of the article:
http://www.lefigaro.fr/flash-actu/2011/05/16/97001-20110516FILWWW00370-ai-weiwei-a-pu-voir-sa-femme.php

ARTINFO.COM has a great roundup on this latest development:
http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/37692/ai-weiweis-wife-finally-allowed-visit-while-the-artists-dealers-weigh-art-hk-participation/

Meanwhile, the petitition has gathered 135,000 names from 174 countries:
http://www.change.org/petitions/call-for-the-release-of-ai-weiwei

Besides the visit from his wife, other developments of note include Assistant Secretary of State Mike Posner’s recent visit to China, in which this initiative and the growing concern of the international art world was directly conveyed to Chinese authorities; and the recent openings of Ai Weiwei’s Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads in New York and London, which attracted wide media attention.

MSNBC article with excerpts from an interview with U.S. State Department official Michael Posner: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42821407/ns/us_news-life/

ARTINFO covers Ai Weiwei’s first major public sculpture installation opening in New York on May 4:
http://www.artinfo.com/news/story/37609/pomp-politics-and-celebrity-attend-the-unveiling-of-ai-weiweis-zodiac-sculpture-in-new-york/

Bits & Pieces: Todd Haynes, WACPacks, prize artists, and more

Director Todd Haynes and his films have appeared at the Walker on a number of occasions, including a few weeks ago when he talked with his good friend Kelly Reichardt at the regional premiere of her new film Meek’s Cutoff. Now he’s gearing up to film a May 31 concert by My Morning Jacket — the […]

The Design Show also recognized the Walker for its exhibitions and catalogues for Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers and From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America (by designers Dante Carlos and Emmet Byrne). Click here for all the 2011 winners.

 

 

  • Some around here regarded Rachel Harrison’s recent Calder Prize with raised eyebrows; for others, it bolstered their appreciation of sculptures like Huffy Howler (below). Doesn’t this 2004  work, part of the Walker collection, suddenly seem a bit Calder-esque after that prize? The 2009 Calder Prize went to Tomás Saraceno, who exhibited here that same year.

  • Finally, here’s a first look at the poster soon to be featured on the Nice Ride bike rack outside the Walker’s Hennepin entrance:

 

 

 

 

Sez Oprah: “everyone’s crazy about” International Klein Blue

The freight trucks arrived at the Walker last week and installation crews are currently installing Yves Klein’s first U.S. retrospective in more than 30 years, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, which opens here October 23. Meanwhile, thanks to the show’s acclaimed run at the Hirshhorn in Washington, D.C. — and fashion editors and […]

yves klein blue acessories

from "The Color of Style for Fall 2010," in the October issue of "O"

The freight trucks arrived at the Walker last week and installation crews are currently installing Yves Klein’s first U.S. retrospective in more than 30 years, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, which opens here October 23. Meanwhile, thanks to the show’s acclaimed run at the Hirshhorn in Washington, D.C. — and fashion editors and stylists, whose long-range schedules are nicely in sync with the museum world’s — “International Klein Blue” has become the breakout hue for fall.

A sizable fashion-and-home spread in Oprah’s O magazine features an interview with Leatrice Eiseman, head of the Eiseman Center for Color Information and Training, who notes that IKB “has a luminous, intense quality that’s really striking. … You’re drawn into it, almost like you’re seeing a light illuminated through it. It’s magical, mystical, infinite, deep” — an observation that sounds strikingly similar to reviwers’ takes on Klein’s monochromes in the retrospective.

As with Oprah’s stylists in the image above, those at Anthropologie are also sprinkling IKB pigment around like so much fairy dust — or its close cousin, presuming they were unable to acquire Klein’s actual, patented IKB pigment. The picture below, from the Walker’s Shape of Time exhibition of works from the Walker collection, shows a trough of the true blue stuff, positioned in front of Klein’s Mondo Cane Shroud.

FYI, some lucky devils in this world have coffee tables made with vitrines full of (yes, patented) IKB pigment, as shown at Design Crisis, whose co-blogger Erin is “OBSESSED with Yves Klein and his badass blue.” She covered Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers here, but last March (i.e. months before the current Klein-o-rama), she also wrote a lengthy post on Klein and interior design, which she called “a labor of love. As in, I literally feel like I just squeezed out a giant blue baby” – a comment that must have had Klein dancing with delight somewhere in his blue heaven. After all, he liked to say that he “impregnated” visitors to one of his gallery openings with IKB, in the form of cocktails that carried his International Klein Blue out into the world, via their urine.

Moving back to fashion, the IKB trend also embraces looks for men; the following puzzling angle on Kleinian fashion from the “men’s clothing, men’s wear” blog may well be a result of a Google translation, but it does attempt a broader art-historical positioning of the artist:

2011 Spring Men's ten week point prevalence

Jil Sander

2011 Spring Men's ten week point prevalence

Prada

“In 1957, French artist Yifukelai because (Yves Klein) in Milan exhibition on display at the 8 same size , similar group of green pigments painted canvas – ” Klein Blue , ” an official appearance in front of the world . Since then, this color was officially named ” International Klein Blue “(International Klein Blue, called IKB). Looking around the spring and summer show season games Gucci handbags, all from Jil Sander to Prada Klein blue preference seems to have added a large number of blocks of color rendering , so the original white male models become more pale , sharp . Live to 34 -year-old Klein, June 6, 1962 in a heart attack . He is considered the most important representatives of Pop ArtFigureOne , and Andy Warhol (Andy Warhol), Marcel Duchamp (Marcel Duchamp) and Yuesefubo AES (Joseph Beuys) , together known as the second half of the 20th century the greatest contribution to world arts The four artists”

The Walker’s  design director, Emmet Byrne, has been digging up more on this storied and celebrated hue — watch the design blog for a series of upcoming posts on the topic.

Outside notes on coming (& current) attractions

Alec Soth, whose survey From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America opens at the Walker in September, has an exhibition focusing on his portraits at the American Academy in Rome. The New York Times just published a portrait of the utterly charming Eiko and Koma as they prepare for their three-year Retrospective Project, which brings […]

Alec Soth, "Mother and Daughter, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1999"

Alec Soth, whose survey From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America opens at the Walker in September, has an exhibition focusing on his portraits at the American Academy in Rome.

The New York Times just published a portrait of the utterly charming Eiko and Koma as they prepare for their three-year Retrospective Project, which brings them to the Walker this fall. The story’s reference to the “moving-painting” quality of their choreography is apt, since here the duo will perform a dance/visual art installation in Gallery 2 of the ongoing Event Horizon exhibition — for the entire month of November. That piece, Naked, is a new commission; they’ll perform another new work, Raven, a centerpiece of their multiyear retrospective project, at Free First Saturday on October 2.

Co-organized by the Walker, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers opened last week at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., and arrives here in October; the first rave review is in, at the Washington Post.

Modern Art Notes’ Tyler Green greatly admires the Chuck Close: Life, the new biography by Christopher Finch — particularly for the full chapter that Finch devotes to Big Self-Portrait, a key piece in the Walker collection and the first work that Close sold. Check out our related item last fall about Chuck, Christopher, and Linda — wife of Christopher, who sat for Chuck in 1971. Big Self-Portrait is currently a highlight of Benches & Binoculars, on view through November 21.

Finally, take a little photo tour of the art scenes in Berlin and Leipzig or, closer to home, the Pappajohn Sculpture Park in Des Moines, IA, via two recent Walker Patrons’ Circle trips.

LOVE PREVAILS

In cold and barren February, we notice the Sun’s brilliance burning a little longer into the afternoon, hinting at the warmth peeking just (months) around the corner.  Similarly, in the sometimes austere and modernist environs of the Walker Art Center, a passionate heat churns just beneath the surface.  Is it possible to fertilize the seeds […]

In cold and barren February, we notice the Sun’s brilliance burning a little longer into the afternoon, hinting at the warmth peeking just (months) around the corner.  Similarly, in the sometimes austere and modernist environs of the Walker Art Center, a passionate heat churns just beneath the surface.  Is it possible to fertilize the seeds of love at the Walker?  It’s possible, and evidence abounds.  Take, for example, this article describing James Turrell’s Sky Pesher as the best make out spot in town.  Kissing in the surrounds of ‘pigmented cast concrete?’  Very steamy.  One should take note, however, of the security camera watching every move.  No matter.  An adventurous lover knows that eyes are always watching, yet she boldly proceeds. 

Meet Ellie, one such bold adventurer.  The object of her affections is the roguish Scotty.  Her family-approved plan (Dad accompanied) was to ask Scotty to her high school’s Sadie Hawkins dance during a visit to the Walker.  Ellie had prepared a sign for her beau, a masterpiece worthy of the Louvre which implored, “Sweet Hearts? With Me, My Scotty” (sic).  Ellie presented me the sign to me in the snowy afternoon, asking where she could hang it. 

My colleagues and I discussed the matter,  chose a suitable place, and the sign was hung.  It was decided that I document the event, so I lay in wait for the magic moment. 

 

The tension was immense.  The unwitting Scotty approached and…

YES

 

Love prevails.

 

Note: Scotty was surprised by Ellie’s sign, but even more surprised by my prescence.  I explained, “I…uh.  I have to do this for work,”  then quickly fled.  Tender moments, cherished forever.

Children should be seen

A friend just send me this post from artfagcity, on images of babies in contemporary art – something we’re both interested in, being moms of toddlers ourselves. (I’d say we’re obsessed, but being moms of toddlers leaves scant time for obsessing about anything except the toddlers.) AFC’s Paddy Johnson also includes a link to this […]

//www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk)

Marlene Dumas, Die Babe (from http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk)

A friend just send me this post from artfagcity, on images of babies in contemporary art – something we’re both interested in, being moms of toddlers ourselves. (I’d say we’re obsessed, but being moms of toddlers leaves scant time for obsessing about anything except the toddlers.) AFC’s Paddy Johnson also includes a link to this essay on motherhood and contemporary artists, from The Brooklyn Rail. While reading it, I recalled watching the uptick in strollers on the streets of Williamsburg (Brooklyn) a few years back – but at the time I wasn’t considering that many of those pushing the strollers might be working artists … Then again, isn’t Williamsburg now too expensive for working artists, with or without offspring? Circling back to artfagcity, an artistic comment on both topics.

PS – Margaret, a working artist and mom-of-toddlers and a regular here on the Walker blogs, has a number of thoughtful posts on art and parenthood.

The Miss Rockaway Armada at MASS MoCA

Off Center’s dear old friend Paul Schmelzer wrote a series of posts on his own blog, eyeteeth, about The Miss Rockaway Armada back in 2006. Paul hung out with the collective when the group of artists, performers, and adventurers were congregating in Minneapolis to begin their journey down the Mississippi river on homemade rafts. A […]

rockaway.jpg

Off Center’s dear old friend Paul Schmelzer wrote a series of posts on his own blog, eyeteeth, about The Miss Rockaway Armada back in 2006. Paul hung out with the collective when the group of artists, performers, and adventurers were congregating in Minneapolis to begin their journey down the Mississippi river on homemade rafts. A traveling community, the artists perform, give workshops, and create spectacles along the journey.

In April, MASS MoCA opened an installation and interactive exhibition by the collective: Being Here Is Better Than Wishing We’d Stayed. There are bunches more images of the installation on the Armada’s blog, including the one below.

massmocainstallation-18.jpg

From the river: Miss Armada flickr pool

And here’s a clip of the ferris wheel in action (pictured at top, photo via Flickr user tchandler.)

Hell Yes!

In light of my new obsession with a certain bacon meme (Did you know there were buttons?), I wanted to post this response to the New Museum‘s Ugo Rondinone. Via Paul and Wooster.

The contemporary art faces of Facebook

Nate Solas blogged Wednesday about the Walker’s participation in ArtShare, a Facebook application allowing you (assuming you’re among the 230 gazillion registered users of Facebook) to show/share selected artwork from museums’ collections on your profile page. The Walker has its own Facebook profile, as do a couple dozen other contemporary art centers and museums around […]

Nate Solas blogged Wednesday about the Walker’s participation in ArtShare, a Facebook application allowing you (assuming you’re among the 230 gazillion registered users of Facebook) to show/share selected artwork from museums’ collections on your profile page. The Walker has its own Facebook profile, as do a couple dozen other contemporary art centers and museums around the U.S. and beyond.

A Facebook search for “contemporary art” pulled up some expected major players, a couple of independent magazines, corners devoted specific origin/ethnicity and a handful of thematic sentiments (there are about 350 members of I Enjoy Modern Art and That Doesn’t Make Me an Elitist A**hole).

Here are links to nearly three dozen Facebook profiles of a contemporary art bent:

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, of Washington, D.C. (175 members)

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art – contemporary extension (110 members)

Contemporary Art Museum of Houston teen arts council (70 members)

On the Boards, Seattle (160 members)

Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland (200 members)

Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (60 members)

Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (30 members)

BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, United Kingdom (60 members)

Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art, Colorado (20 fans)

Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, Turkey (1,570 members)

Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (40 members)

International Contemporary Art and Design Lovers (780 members)

Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art, Winnipeg (710 members)

Axis — Online Resource for Contemporary Art (800 members)

Chinese Contemporary Art (450 members)

Sydney Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia (410 members)

Contemporary Egyptian Artists (375 members)

International Academy of Art Palestine (350 members)

Connoisseurs of Contemporary African Art (275 members)

BM Suma Contemporary Art Center, of Istanbul, Turkey (280 members)

Contemporary Art: Singapore (240 members)

Art Summit Indonesia, a triennial international performing arts taking place in Jakarta (240 members)

Vancouver International Centre for Contemporary Asian Art (200 members)

I Made Something at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (15 members)

I Bet I can Find 10,000 People Who Love Contemporary Art (1,440 members)

I Enjoy Modern Art and That Doesn’t Make Me an Elitist A**hole (350 members)

Art Papers Magazine (2,100 members)

White Hot Magazine of Contemporary Art (1,350 members)

Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati (160 members)

Contemporary Art in Liverpool (100 members)

Contemporary Jewish Museum (100 members)

Contemporary African Art (26 members)

British Contemporary Art (26 members)

Greek Contemporary Art (15 members)

Goteborg International Biennial of Contemporary Art!, Sweden (15 members)

Contemporary Ghanaian Artists (8 members)

Filipino Contemporary Art, home listed in Switzerland (3 members)

Contemporary Art New Zealand (3 members)

Cuban Contemporary Art, formed by a gallery in Spain (2 members)

For those who think the suburbs are scary …

The Walker’s Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes doesn’t open until February 16, but you might appreciate the suburban-focused art and architecture of that exhibition a little more after examining some distinctive urban fingerprints. The WebUrbanist blog, in continuing its thought-provoking Seven Wonders series, trains its latest foray on “the scariest, steepest, longest, widest, narrowest, most […]

lombardstreet.jpg

The Walker’s Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes doesn’t open until February 16, but you might appreciate the suburban-focused art and architecture of that exhibition a little more after examining some distinctive urban fingerprints. The WebUrbanist blog, in continuing its thought-provoking Seven Wonders series, trains its latest foray on “the scariest, steepest, longest, widest, narrowest, most confusing and most crooked urban streets in the world!” (pictured, from the series, is San Francisco’s Lombard Street).

Surprising that with “narrow” and “crooked” among the criteria, 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue didn’t make the list.