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Centerpoints: Punk’s Lascaux

Graffiti uncovered on walls in a London flat are works of art meriting the site’s preservation, says a British archaeologist. The apartment was rented in the mid-’70s by members of the Sex Pistols, and many of the images were drawn by John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten. “The tabloid press once claimed that early Beatles recordings discovered at the BBC were the most important archaeological find since Tutankhamun’s tomb,” says John Schofield of the University of York. “The Sex Pistols’ graffiti in Denmark Street surely ranks alongside this and — to our minds — usurps it.”

More art news inside.

• In an early commemoration of its 50th birthday in 2015, Modern Art Oxford (formerly the Museum of Modern Art Oxford) is exhibiting 50 promotional posters from its exhibitions, curated by artists Simon and Tom Bloor. Included are posters for shows by Donald Judd, Joseph Beuys, Yoko Ono, and Alexander Rodchenko. Creative Review notes that the names of designers has been omitted, a problem it’s trying to rectify on its site.

• A plan floated by Minnesota Republicans to dedicate funds from the Legacy Amendment, a voter-approved constitutional measure directing a 3/8-cent sales tax to arts and environmental projects, for a Vikings stadium would hurt small arts groups, according to sources in an MPR story on the plan.

• Punk’s Lascaux: Graffiti uncovered on walls in a London flat are works of art meriting the site’s preservation, says a British archaeologist. The apartment was rented in the mid-’70s by members of the Sex Pistols, and many of the images were drawn by John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten. “The tabloid press once claimed that early Beatles recordings discovered at the BBC were the most important archaeological find since Tutankhamun’s tomb,” says John Schofield of the University of York. “The Sex Pistols’ graffiti in Denmark Street surely ranks alongside this and — to our minds — usurps it.”

• First China accused artist Ai Weiwei of trafficking in pornography for sharing an artwork in which he and several women were photographed nude. Now Facebook seems to be getting in on the action: When documentary filmmaker Alison Klayman posted Ai’s image, the social networking site automatically removed it. She then altered the photos to cover the figures’ “naughty parts” with the Facebook logo, in hopes of conforming with the site’s community standards. The result: Her personal account was disabled. She writes:

Nudity is not always pornography, and censorship is not only about government. Considering that I complied with Facebook’s “Community Guidelines” as soon as I was warned, I am left guessing about why my personal account was disabled. Could it be that it was an automatic action that is taken whether or not a warning is heeded? Was it retribution for using Facebook’s logo to highlight their censoring of the images?

• Winners of the 2011-12 MCAD-Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists have been announced. Congratulations to Twin Cities artists Richard Barlow (a detail of his silver bromide painting is pictured above), Lauren Herzak-Bauman, Alison Hiltner, and Jehra Patrick (who works here at the Walker) and Gregory Euclide, of Le Sueur, Minn.

• It’s Thanksgiving week. You have much to be grateful for, Minnesota artists!

Centerpoints: Pina, Marina and pepper spray

Inside: Marina Abramovic, Clyfford Still, Ai Weiwei, Peter Haakon Thompson, Zhao Zhao, Yoko Ono, John Lennon, Wim Wenders, Raymond Pettibon and others.

•  Videos of police pepper-spraying nonviolent student protesters at UC-Davis went viral over the weekend, and one result is the new Tumblr site peppersprayingcop.tumblr.com, which has plenty of art references: The cop who casually sprayed students at point blank range finds himself superimposed into Picasso’s Guernica, da Vinci’s The Last Supper, Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s anti-war Bed-In, and Jacques-Louis David’s The Death of Marat, to name a few.

• Following her big MoMA retrospective last year, performance artist Marina Abramovic (who also got the pepper-spray photoshop treatment) “experienced a radical shift in status: art-world divinity to crossover media star,” writes the New York Times‘ Guy Trebay.

• Chinese authorities want to pin another crime on Ai Weiwei: Distributing pornography. Ai’s assistant Zhao Zhao has reportedly been interrograted by police over a photo of a nude Ai appearing beside four likewise nude women. Now the Guardian reports that some of Ai’s fans are tweeting nude self-portraits to the artist in solidarity. Hyperallergic captures some of their NSFW creations.

Pina — Wim Wenders’ 3D film about choreographer Pina Bausch — is among the 15 shortlisted documentaries for the next Oscars.

• Our friends at Intermedia Arts here in Minneapolis have launched ArtsHub, a shared office/creative confab arrangement for artists. It’s the brainchild of artist Peter Haakon Thompson, who’s behind several local arty institutions, including the Art Shanty Projects (in which artists reimagine ice-fishing shacks for more creative purposes) and The A Project (in which arts supporters identify themselves to neighbors by putting signs bearing a bright red A in their windows).

• In conjunction with its exhibition The Air We Breathe, featuring 30 works commissioned by artists including Raymond Pettibon and Amy Sillman on equal rights for same sex couples, SFMOMA hosted a livestreamed panel discussion Friday about the state of the campaign for marriage equality. I’m curious what the artistic response will be here in Minnesota to next fall’s ballot measure that proposes to add a ban on same-sex marriage into the state constitution.

• The new Clyfford Still Museum opens in Denver.

• With new protests against the military government in Egypt, new graffiti is appearing in Tahrir Square.

Centerpoints: Chili Peppers, Raymond Pettibon, and Miranda July’s deer legs

• Ai Weiwei makes the cover of the Nov. 21 issue of Newsweek‘s international edition, filmmaker Alison Klayman reports. In the accompanying piece he discusses his captivity earlier this year: “I really wished someone could beat me, because at least that’s human contact. Then you can see some anger. But to dismiss emotion, to be […]

Ai Weiwei makes the cover of the Nov. 21 issue of Newsweek‘s international edition, filmmaker Alison Klayman reports. In the accompanying piece he discusses his captivity earlier this year: “I really wished someone could beat me, because at least that’s human contact. Then you can see some anger. But to dismiss emotion, to be cut off from any reason, or anger, or fear, psychologically that’s very threatening.”

• The Red Hot Chili Peppers pays homage to artist Raymond Pettibon in a video for their new song that uses animations “inspired by” the LA artist’s work.

• Rob Walker on the duel shower head as “a moral crossroad.”

• Miranda July, one of the artists featured in Lynn Hershman Leeson’s film !Women Art Revolution (screening  at the Walker Nov. 18-20), is selling things — things like a “lucky pair of deer hooves given as a gift by a friend” and “collection of 43 stolen oil paints” — at a pop-up store in Manhattan’s NoHo neighborhood. The items are inspired by her new book It Chooses You (McSweeney’s).

2011 Turner Prize winner Karla Black: “Art is a sort of boxed-off little bit of civilized society where permission is given for us to freely behave like the animals we are.”

• As New York Mayor Bloomberg orders tents and belongings cleared from Occupy Wall Street’s Zuccotti Park encampment in advance of Thursday’s plan to shut down the New York Stock Exchange, PDN looks inside Occupy London’s tents through the work of photographer Ben Roberts.

• It’s Give to the Max Day here in Minnesota. Yes, we’re doing it, as are heaps of other worthy nonprofits that could use your donation.

Centerpoints: Vonnegut, Herzog, and Angry Birds

• “It’s exhilarating for a man to be shot at unsuccessfully”: Filmmaker Werner Herzog discusses getting shot at, his unequivocal opposition to the death penalty, and his new film, Into the Abyss. • To commemorate publication of the book Saul Bass: A Life In Film & Design (designed by Bass’ daughter Jennifer), Art of the […]

• “It’s exhilarating for a man to be shot at unsuccessfully”: Filmmaker Werner Herzog discusses getting shot at, his unequivocal opposition to the death penalty, and his new film, Into the Abyss.

• To commemorate publication of the book Saul Bass: A Life In Film & Design (designed by Bass’ daughter Jennifer), Art of the Title‘s Ian Albinson created a visual history of some of the late designer’s most memorable film sequences. (Albinson curated the film titles section of the Walker exhibition, Graphic Design: Now In Production.)

• Despite protestations by Yvonne Rainer and 52 others, a Marina Abramović performance the choreographer dubbed “grotesque” and a “public humiliation” went on as scheduled over the weekend. LA MOCA’s $2,500-a-plate (minimum) fundraiser included human centerpieces and prone nudes topped with skeletons. The LA Times quotes several attendees who said Rainer’s “exploitation” charge was a stretch, while C-Monster offers a cheaper alternative to Abramović’s centerpieces: a $12 version using an Angry Birds piñata.

• Reader Marianne writes in to Letters of Note: “In 1989 my husband passed on; I was 36-years-old and left with 3 small children. For some reason I wrote to Kurt Vonnegut and thanked him for his books and his compassion. I did not expect a reply. He must have been a kind man, as he sent this to me within a month of writing to him.” Read the letter.

The Guardian reports that, concerned about global warming and gallery expenses, Tate director Nicolas Sirota is urging fellow museum heads worldwide to drop long-held rules on gallery temperature and humidity. “We need to devise imaginative new solutions to resolve the dichotomy between long-term collections care and expensive environmental conditions,” he reportedly said at a recent conference. I’m curious if Liberate Tate, the activist group that’s trying to pressure Serota and the Tate to drop oil giant BP as a sponsor, will have a response to the plea.

• Minnesota Public Radio and the City of Minneapolis have teamed up to launch Sound Point, “a new interactive audio tour that allows visitors to use their mobile devices to access stories about works of public art in Minneapolis.”

Centerpoints: Wojnarowicz redux?

A year after the controversial removal of a video by the late David Wojnarowicz from the National Portrait Gallery show HIDE/SEEK, the exhibition is set to open in Brooklyn, and some religious groups are again calling for the censure of the piece, which includes brief footage of ants crawling on a crucifix. This and more, inside.

• A year after the controversial removal of the late David Wojnarowicz’s video A Fire in My Belly from a National Portrait Gallery show on the role of sexual identity in modern art, religious groups are renewing efforts to censor the work. The offending show, HIDE/SEEK, is set to open at the Brooklyn Museum of Art next week, and some are calling for the work — which includes a short bit of footage showing ants crawling on a crucifix — to be removed. But the museum doesn’t seem likely to budge. Director Arnold Lehman said the show will go on as intended by its curators, and he defended the entire presentation: “For a city that prides itself on diversity and creativity, there couldn’t be a better exhibition.” Here’s the entire work, which the Walker screened last year.

• Famed choreographer Yvonne Rainer is no fan of the performance Marina Abramović has planned for LA MoCA’s annual gala this weekend. In a letter to museum director Jeffrey Deitch, Rainer wrote, “It has come to my attention that a number of young people will be ensconced under the diners’ tables on lazy Susans and also be required to display their nude bodies under fake skeletons.” Calling the performance a “grotesque spectacle” and a “degrading” form of fundraising, she writes:

Subjecting her performers to public humiliation at the hands of a bunch of frolicking donors is yet another example of the Museum’s callousness and greed and Ms Abramovic’s obliviousness to differences in context and to some of the implications of transposing her own powerful performances to the bodies of others. An exhibition is one thing — this is not a critique of Abramovic’s work in general — but titillation for wealthy diners as a means of raising money is another.

• Five “portable murals” by Diego Rivera will be reunited for this weekend’s opening of a solo show by the late Mexican artist at MoMA. The works are “large blocks of frescoed plaster, slaked lime, and wood that feature bold images drawn from Mexican subject matter and address themes of revolution and class inequity.” While that theme is particularly fitting today, the presentation is historic as well: It reunites many of the works from a 1931 solo show, MoMA’s second ever monographic exhibition.

Brian Ulrichinterviewed here in conjunction with the 2008 Walker exhibition Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes — is featured on The Guardian today for his new book Is This Place Great or What, which compiles photos from his eight-year documentation of American consumer culture. Also, on Monday, he was featured in the paper’s The Big Ideas podcast, discussing his project as it relates to Ernst Fritz Schumacher’s notion of “Buddhist economics.”

• Closed for two months, the New York Historical Society reopens today with new facilities, including a children’s history museum and a new restaurant. Another feature getting attention: Keith Haring’s 1986 work Doodle, which was once part of the now-closed Pop Shop, now hangs above the society’s admissions desk.

• Occupy Wall Street’s Arts & Culture Committee is asking sculptor Mark di Suvero for help in getting barricades removed from around his work Joie de Vivre in Zuccotti Park. “We believe that cordoning off your gift to the people of New York goes against your intentions for the work, as well as the very spirit of public art,” the committee wrote in a letter. “‘Joie de Vivre’ is especially poignant as this movement actively fights to empower people of marginalized economic status. Indeed, that struggle is the joy of life.”

• The inaugural Modern Art Notes podcast is up and features an interview with artist Chris Burden on, among other topics, the role of risk-taking in art.

• The New York Times takes note of artist Pedro Reyes’ trip — with his puppet versions of Karl Marx and Adam Smith — to Occupy Wall Street.

Centerpoints: Style Wars, spotted horses and Christo

• Henry Chalfant and Tony Silver’s seminal 1984 documentary Style Wars condensed some 30 hours of 16 mm footage into a groundbreaking 69-minute film on the origins of hip hop culture. Now the unused footage — including clips of a b-boy battle featuring the Rock Steady Crew and interviews with legendary graffiti artists Kase 2, […]

• Henry Chalfant and Tony Silver’s seminal 1984 documentary Style Wars condensed some 30 hours of 16 mm footage into a groundbreaking 69-minute film on the origins of hip hop culture. Now the unused footage — including clips of a b-boy battle featuring the Rock Steady Crew and interviews with legendary graffiti artists Kase 2, Dondi and Seen — are deteriorating and in need of restoration. Enter: Kickstarter, where the filmmakers are fundraising to find the $28,000 needed to save and restore the outtakes.

Poster designs for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games were revealed on Friday, with posters going on sale in the Olympics shop. The 12 participating artists: Martin Creed, Anthea Hamilton, Howard Hodgkin, Chris Ofili, Bridget Riley, Rachel Whiteread, Fiona Banner, Michael Craig-Martin, Tracey Emin, Gary Hume, Sarah Morris (poster detail above) and Bob and Roberta Smith. Here’s one designer’s response to the series.

• New research suggests that 25,000-year old paintings of spotted horses found in caves in southwest France were realistic rather than symbolic renderings. The much-debated question may be put to rest after scientists compared modern horse DNA with that of Stone Age horses to find that the leopard-spotted ones existed. Said one researcher, “Why they took the effort making these beautiful paintings will always remain a miracle to us. It’s an enigma, but it’s also nice to see that if we go back 25,000 years, people didn’t have much technology and life was probably hard, but nevertheless they already endeavored in producing art. It tells us a lot about ourselves as a species.”

• U.S. regulators have given the go-ahead to artist Christo to install 5.9 miles worth of suspended fabric over the Colorado River. The Over the River project is expected to bring in $121 million in economic activity and attract some 400,000 viewers over the installation and presentation of the work.

• As the Walker’s backstage signature wall adds some historic names — dancers on the Merce Cunningham Dance Company’s final tour ever — here’s a look at the same kind of wall at New York City Center.

• Letters in history: Jimi Hendrix’s 1966 pre–Hey Joe postcard to his father while on tour in Germany.

Centerpoints: Architecture, Alzheimer’s and Malcolm X

• Architectural waste — and sometimes entire houses — from the U.S. often find unexpected, new lives across the border in Tijuana in a process documented by photographers Laura Migliorino and Anthony Paul Marchetti. Featured in the 2008 Walker exhibition Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes, Migliorino tells Minnesota Photoblog: The history of United States architectural […]

• Architectural waste — and sometimes entire houses — from the U.S. often find unexpected, new lives across the border in Tijuana in a process documented by photographers Laura Migliorino and Anthony Paul Marchetti. Featured in the 2008 Walker exhibition Worlds Away: New Suburban Landscapes, Migliorino tells Minnesota Photoblog:

The history of United States architectural recycling is pretty old. The first flatbeaded pre-manufactured housing shipping began in the 1940s after World War II: a military housing development in San Diego was shipped over the border and planted in Mexico for reuse, and now it’s a Tijuanan housing subdivision. This process of moving American houses continues still in various forms–most of it is suburban housing now; it’s a thriving business, actually.

• “[A]rt can trigger the emotional memory that often remains strong in Alzheimer’s patients, and can give them access to other memories as well,” says Anne Basting, director of the Center on Age and Community at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, in ArtNews‘ look at museum-based programs for people living with the disease. The Walker’s version, the monthly Contemporary Journeys Tours, meets next on Nov. 30 with a tour of Graphic Design: Now In Production for people with Alzheimer’s, their caregivers and families.

• Around 20,000 people worldwide have donated to Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei to help pay $2.3 million in back taxes Chinese authorities claim he owes. He’s taken in more than $840,000 in small donations. Ai said Monday, “This shows that a group of people who want to express their views are using their money to cast their votes. It shows that in the Internet age, society will have it own judgment and its own values.”

• Meanwhile, a sculpture of Ai — depicted dead on the floor in a blue suit and titled The Death of Marat — is causing a stir in the German town of Bad Ems: The piece by Chinese artist He Xiangyu is so realistic that “dozens” of people passing the gallery where it’s displayed called the police to report the death.

• Writing that designer Saul Bass turned the movie title sequence into an artform, design thinker Alice Rawsthorn includes a cute tidbit:

To celebrate his engagement to [designer Elaine] Makatura, Bass even allowed himself a joke. The closing credits for “West Side Story” are “written” as graffiti on the New York streets, including the initials “SB” and “EM” inside a heart.

At Designer Observer, Reinhold Martin looks at how “urbanistic — and to a lesser extent, architectural — considerations have played a key role in the physical occupation of prominent sites in cities and towns.”

• Video: For his show Glenn Ligon: AMERICA, on view now at LACMA, Ligon discusses his “Coloring” series (among other topics), in which he made paintings based on the ways kids he worked with colored pages from late-’60s/early ’70s coloring books made by black educators and featuring civil rights–era leaders:

So a five-year old is doing a drawing of an image of Malcolm X and they give him blue eyeshadow and lipstick, which is a sort like queering up the father figure, which is something I would’ve done when I was five years old…. Looking at that as an adult, you bring all the things you know about Malcolm X to that image, and it’s quite scandalous, in some ways… I was interested in a kind of adult anxiety about images, but also to think about how slippery images are and how they mean different things over different moments.

Centerpoints: Art links from Ai to Sze

• “Women hold slightly more than half (52.3 percent) of creative class jobs and their average level of education is almost the same as men,” writes Richard Florida. “But the pay they receive is anything but equal. Creative class men earn an average of $82,009 versus $48,077 for creative class women. This $33,932 gap is […]

• “Women hold slightly more than half (52.3 percent) of creative class jobs and their average level of education is almost the same as men,” writes Richard Florida. “But the pay they receive is anything but equal. Creative class men earn an average of $82,009 versus $48,077 for creative class women. This $33,932 gap is a staggering 70 percent of the average female creative class salary.”

Sarah Sze, whose work is the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s conservatory, has installed a bird city on the High Line in New York — and you can see it on Google Street View.

Modern Art Notes is launching a podcast that “will become a sort of ‘Fresh Air’-for-art,” writes Tyler Green. First guest on the MAN Podcast, which launches Nov. 10: Artist Chris Burden.

• Artist Wim Delvoye, whose Caterpillar #5 found its home in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden for a time, has offered to recreate on his land in Belgium the Shanghai studio of Ai Weiwei that was demolished by Chinese authorities in January. Ai’s assistants say Delvoye, who has ties to China, risks “trouble” if he goes through with the plan. Asked if he would, should Ai agree, he said, “Of course.”

• A cleaner who mistook layers of dried paint in a black rubber trough for a mess needing her attention damaged a work by the late Martin Kippenberger. A museum spokesperson says the cleaner “removed the patina from the four walls of the trough” of the piece, When It Starts Dripping From The Ceiling, which is valued at around $1.1 million.

• Rick Poynor considers online reading and whether links distract from meaning. Follow this link to read all about it.

• Another Walker hard-rock logo: After the Walker’s black-metal look, a glimpse of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company’s AC/DC-inspired stencil.

Centerpoints: UNESCO vote, Ai’s taxes, a design ‘ur-exhibit’

• UNESCO – the UN body that maintains World Heritage sites, among other activities – will lose a quarter of its budget after the U.S. announced it wouldn’t pay its dues following a vote by 107 nations to accept Palestine as a member. • “The idea of ‘beauty’ represents the unexamined terminology of utopian thinking,” […]

UNESCO – the UN body that maintains World Heritage sites, among other activities – will lose a quarter of its budget after the U.S. announced it wouldn’t pay its dues following a vote by 107 nations to accept Palestine as a member.

• “The idea of ‘beauty’ represents the unexamined terminology of utopian thinking,” said Jake Chapman (pictured) at New York’s 92nd Street Y last week, “and it dangerously asserts one idea: that humanity is progressing and should progress towards a sort of Romantic sublime. I think the best art challenges the idea that beauty is a universal term.”

• Chinese authorities have served Ai Weiwei with an official demand telling him to pay 15 million yuan — or $2.3 million — in back taxes within 15 days, according to the artist, who says he doesn’t have the money to pay.

• New on Ubuweb, all the tracks on the 1993 two-disk release,  A Chance Operation: The John Cage Tribute. Unfortunately chopped into small bits, the album features artists  Laurie Anderson (performing/reading Cage’s text Cunningham Stories), Frank Zappa (doing Cage’s silent symphony 4’33″), and Yoko Ono, among others.

• “The best creative years for a photographer, I’d proclaim, are 20 to 40,” Alec Soth blogs, “but the peak is 25 to 35.” Commenters weigh in — en masse.

• Design thinker and a former New York Times art director Steven Heller calls the Walker’s Graphic Design: Now in Production the “ur-exhibit of the 2000s.

• The Occupy Wall Street protests  in New York are “kind of art object: a living installation or social sculpture made of bodies, animals, alternative barter stations for food, clothes, and books, a kitchen with composting, literature tables, public lectures, assemblies, a ‘community sacred space,’ drum circles, protesters, media center, press team, visiting journalists, walkways taped off for tourists, and lots and lots of text—painted, written, scrawled, and printed on every conceivable surface,” writes Martha Schwendener. “How could art — that is, the stuff made in the art world — compare with this?” One artist who’s taking a shot at the question is Pedro Reyes: He took his Karl Marx and Adam Smith puppets from the Walker’s Baby Marx exhibition to the New York protests.

 

Centerpoints: Minnesota high in art, publishing jobs, NEA finds

• A new National Endowment for the Arts survey finds there are 2.1 million Americans are employed as artists, including more than 42,000 right here in the Land o’ Lakes. Minnesota ranks fairly well: We’re among the top 14 states that have the highest percentage of the workforce employed in the arts: 1.5 percent, compared […]

• A new National Endowment for the Arts survey finds there are 2.1 million Americans are employed as artists, including more than 42,000 right here in the Land o’ Lakes. Minnesota ranks fairly well: We’re among the top 14 states that have the highest percentage of the workforce employed in the arts: 1.5 percent, compared to the nation-leading New York, where 2.3 percent of the labor force is involved in arts industries. Minnesota leads the nation in the concentration of jobs in book publishing, with eight times more publishing jobs — largely in the Twin Cities — than the national average. Minneapolis’ concentration of theater jobs is twice the national average.

• As Occupy Wall Street gets a visual manifesto vaguely reminiscent of diagrams by the late Mark Lombardi, Shepard Fairey has released a series of free downloadable protest posters in solidarity with the movement.

• A talk on education reform by Sir Ken Robinson went viral — earning nearly 6 million views on YouTube — after the Royal Society of Art hired illustrator Andrew Park to turn it into a whiteboard animation. See the video in the Walker’s design show.

• With all the buzz about MOMA acquiring Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija‘s Untitled (Free/Still), one of the first works dubbed “relational aesthetics,” Greg Allen looks at a less discussed side of the artist — as a maker of “some of the blingiest, sexy-shiniest, most ridiculously commodified luxury objects around.”

Franco & Eva Mattes of 0100101110101101.org say they got a fake Dieter Roth artwork — a glass jar filled with dead flies — into a St. Louis gallery show. “The piece has been shown for over a month, and nobody questioned its authenticity or worthiness. The image of the jar with flies started circulating on the Internet, and it’s also mentioned in Roth’s biography in Wikipedia.”

• Carsten Höller, the insect scientist turned artist whose two-story slide is now installed inside the New Museum: “Subjective personal experience in science is a no-no. In starting to make art, I wanted to bring in what had been forbidden.”

• Today in infographics: Word frequencies in the Bible and the Qu’ran. Via Information Aesthetics.

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