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2,508 Square Feet: Photomurals of the Walker’s 75th Anniversary

2,508. That’s the answer to Walker curator Andrew Blauvelt’s question about the total square footage of the nine murals and one artwork currently hanging in Walker galleries for our WALKER@75 anniversary celebration. That’s 2,508 square feet of imagery that I, as the Walker’s image specialist, produced or did the Photoshop compositing on: • 1280 s.f. […]

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Jeremy Stauffer of Nameless Signs Co. installs one of the seven murals in the Selfie Station, which is one view through Sunday in Medtronic Gallery. Photo: Greg Beckel, ©Walker Art Center

2,508. That’s the answer to Walker curator Andrew Blauvelt’s question about the total square footage of the nine murals and one artwork currently hanging in Walker galleries for our WALKER@75 anniversary celebration. That’s 2,508 square feet of imagery that I, as the Walker’s image specialist, produced or did the Photoshop compositing on:

• 1280 s.f. for the seven Selfie Station murals in Medtronic Gallery,

• 678 s.f. for Goshka Macuga’s Lost Forty, installed in the just-opened exhibition Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections,

• 183 s.f. for a mural from a 1904 photo of the interior of T.B. Walker’s home, also part of Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections, and

• 367 s.f. for a mural of a 1962 photo of Allan Kaprow’s The Happening which took place in the Lehmann Mushroom Caves in St. Paul. This is part of the exhibition, Art Expanded, 1958–1978.

The nine murals took about 40 hours to print at Thomas Reprographics. Luckily, most of these images were not made with a digital camera. This enabled us to scan film or photographic enlargements at a high resolution, giving us larger files than most digital cameras are capable of. This came with a cost, however. The dust, scratches, fingerprints, stains, etc. took countless hours to remove. Scanning was done by Walker Visual Resources Specialist, Barbara Economon.

Be sure to visit the Selfie Station in the next four days. Those seven murals will be removed on Monday.

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Spring Dance Festival at the Walker, 1940. Photo: ©Walker Art Center Archives

This first dance event held at the newly formed Walker Art Center featured the Modern Dance Group; choreographer Gertrude Lippincott, a champion of modern dance, stands next to the base of the stairs. Lippincott and Nancy Hauser were key to the creation of a vibrant dance community in the Twin Cities in the 1940s, and Walker director Daniel Defenbacher was eager to present events such as this Spring Dance Festival. He had recently been hired to run the Works Progress Administration (WPA)-funded regional art center, so supporting public art programs was part of his mission. The mural at the top of the staircase is Red River Ox Cart Drovers by Lucia Wiley, completed as part of the WPA Federal Art Project.

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The ONCE Group’s Kittyhawk (An Antigravity Piece), Here2 Festival at the Walker, 1965. Photo: ©Walker Art Center Archives

Before there was “performance art,” there was the ONCE Group, and director Martin Friedman invited them to the Walker to perform Kittyhawk (An Antigravity Piece). The Minneapolis Tribune reviewer described it as a “dull hoax,” an evening that included two men attaching a woman to a screen with masking tape; a blindfolded young woman walking a plank between two high ladders; two men rolling four bowling balls into a sack before a young woman got in also; an announcer giving the audience endless instructions on folding a piece of paper, and so on. Friedman recalled, “Their performances were highly physical, verging on perilous circuslike antics. This was an early event in my directorship and a scary one, I might add, since these young composers, playwrights, and musicians took chances. It was not that I hadn’t seen daredevil events before, but this was the first time I was responsible for them, all in the name of art.”

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Installation view of Dan Flavin’s Untitled (To Elizabeth and Richard Koshalek) at the Walker, 1971. Photo: ©Walker Art Center Archives

Dan Flavin’s Untitled (To Elizabeth and Richard Koshalek)—a tunnel filled with multicolored lights that bisected the gallery—was created for the exhibition that inaugurated the Walker’s new building in May 1971. Designed by Edward Larrabee Barnes, the museum’s seven white-cube galleries were conceived specifically for the new kinds of works being made in the the late 1960s and early 1970s—art that had no place in typical galleries. The show, titled Works for New Spaces, marked a critical moment in the Walker’s history and, arguably, in the broader art world. Curated by director Martin Friedman, Works for New Spaces featured 22 works, 21 of which were special commissions, with artists making the work partly or wholly on-site. That practice is commonplace now, but this was the first time it had been done, at least on such a wide scale.

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David Byrne at the Walker, 1984. Photo: ©Walker Art Center Archives

While on-site in April 1984 for the world premiere of Robert Wilson’s The Knee Plays (for which he wrote the score), David Byrne made this promo for the Walker’s Center Book Shop. That same year, he appeared with director Jonathan Demme at the Minneapolis premiere of Stop Making Sense at the Terrace Theater in Minneapolis. This concert movie featuring the Talking Heads live on stage was hailed by Leonard Maltin as “one of the greatest rock movies ever made.” Byrne returned to the Walker many times over the decades, including his appearance as the featured act at Rock the Garden 2004.

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Keith Haring with his mural at the Walker, 1984. Photo: ©Walker Art Center Archives

The image was both confounding and comical: a multi-armed creature with a computer for a head. The year was 1984, the site was the Walker Art Center’s Concourse, the hallway between the museum and the Guthrie Theater, and the artist—then the toast of New York’s graffiti and gallery scene—was Keith Haring.

Thirty years ago, from March 12 through 16, Haring was an artist-in-residence at the Walker, where he created the giant mural. Now existing only through photographic and video documentation, the orange and green wall piece was created to commemorate the completion of the Walker’s then-new underground education center, and remained on view through December 1985. In addition to Haring, artists including Skip Blumberg, Richard Lerman, David Moss, Mark Coleman, Susan Keiser, Donald Lipski, Chris Osgood, Debra Frasier, Jacques d’Amboise, and Isaac Bashevis Singer were invited to participate in the festivities.

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Cover of a brochure for “Brilliant!” New Art from London at the Walker, 1995. ©Walker Art Center Archives

This 1995 Walker exhibition featured work from rising stars in the British art world such as Liam Gillick, Dinos and Jake Chapman, Angus Fairhurst, Rachel Whiteread, Damien Hirst, Chris Ofili, Gillian Wearing, and Sarah Lucas. Thirty years earlier, the Walker had mounted a show called London: The New Scene, which also presented work from the UK’s best and brightest artists, including Peter Blake, David Hockney, Allen Jones, Phillip King, and Bridget Riley.

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Trisha Brown, Man Walking Down the Side of a Building at the Walker, 2008. Photo: Gene Pittman, ©Walker Art Center

Trisha Brown’s simple yet spectacular 1970 equipment piece was reconstructed at the Walker in the summer of 2008, with the performer standing on the roof of the Walker’s brick building facing the green space. He leaned forward until he reached a seemingly death-defying 90-degree angle to the building, then calmly walked down its side, absolutely parallel to the ground.

This performance was part of The Year of Trisha, a program of events honoring a career spanning more than 40 years, presented by the Walker Art Center, Northrop Dance Season, and the University of Minnesota Dance Program from April through August 2008. Highlights included an exhibition of Brown’s drawing, installations, and performance pieces at the Walker; reconstructions of several early site-specific performance works on the Walker campus; lectures, classes, workshops, and an evening of dance at Northrop.

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Goshka Macuga’s Lost Forty on view in the exhibition Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections, 2014. Photo: Greg Beckel, ©Walker Art Center

Measuring 48 feet wide by 14 feet high, Macuga’s woven tapestry is based on a photo composite I created, using figures from the Walker Archives superimposed onto photographer Cameron Wittig’s image of the Lost Forty, a plot of land in northern Minnesota accidentally left uncut during the state’s lumber boom. Read more on the production of this tapestry here.

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Mural behind Jade Mountain in one of the time capsules in the exhibition Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections, 2014. Photo: Greg Beckel, ©Walker Art Center

Now part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ collection, the Chinese jade carving Jade Mountain Illustrating the Gathering of Scholars at the Lanting Pavillion (1784) was initially acquired by Walker founder T.B. Walker and exhibited in his gallery on Hennepin Avenue. Making a temporary return to the Walker for Art at the Center, the 640-pound piece is presented in the galleries in front of a photomural created using an 8 X 10 glass plate in Walker’s Archives. Jade Mountain is visible on a table in the background of the photo.

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Mural of image made of Allan Kaprow’s The Happening, 1962. On view in the exhibition Art Expanded, 1958–1978, 2014. Photo: Gene Pittman, ©Walker Art Center

A photo mural documenting Allan Kaprow’s 1962 happening in St. Paul’s Lehmann Mushroom Caves—the subject of a Pioneer Press story last week—was  shot by Pioneer Press photographer Spence Holstadt. The 35mm negatives are now owned by the Minnesota Historical Society. Eric Mortenson, with the Collections Management Department at the Minnesota History Center, was kind enough to escort the negatives to the Walker so that we could scan to our specs, in preparation for the work’s inclusion in Art Expanded.

Jade Mountain Returns

October 3 marked a homecoming, albeit temporary, for a beloved work of art: long part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ collection, Jade Mountain was installed in the galleries for the October 16 opening of Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections. Its history with the Walker goes back more than 100 years […]

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Walker and MIA art handlers install Jade Mountain in Art at the Center

October 3 marked a homecoming, albeit temporary, for a beloved work of art: long part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ collection, Jade Mountain was installed in the galleries for the October 16 opening of Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections. Its history with the Walker goes back more than 100 years to the museum’s founder, Thomas Barlow Walker.

Jade Mountain Illustrating the Gathering of Scholars at the Lanting Pavillion (1784), carved from light green jade in Qing Dynasty China, chronicles members of an ancient literary society as they celebrate the Spring Purification Festival alongside a stream in Shaoxing. As curators explained on the joint Walker/MIA website ArtsConnectEd: “The scholars engaged in a drinking contest: Wine cups were floated down a small winding creek as the men sat along its banks; whenever a cup stopped, the man closest to the cup was required to empty it and write a poem. In the end, 26 of the participants composed 37 poems. Wang Xizhi was asked to write an introduction to the collection of these poems.” That poem, transcribed by Emperor Ch’ein-lung, appears on Jade Mountain.

The work, the largest jade carving outside of China, was brought to the United States by Herbert Squiers, who served as Secretary of the U. S. Delegation in Peking (Beijing) until 1901. Squiers donated much of his collection of Chinese jade and porcelain to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but after his death in 1912 the remainder was put up for auction. T.B. Walker’s top bid of $4,000 brought the work to Minneapolis. Included in a “time capsule” within Art at the Center, Jade Mountain is presented in front of a photographic reproduction of Walker’s mansion, where the the 640-pound sculpture is visible on a table. The work was part of Walker’s collection through his death in 1928, his gallery’s reopening as a public art center in 1940, and throughout much of the Walker Art Center’s modern history. In 1976 Jade Mountain went on long-term loan to the MIA, and over the ensuing decade negotiations led to the permanent transfer of its ownership to the MIA. The MIA generously agreed to lend this spectacular piece for Art at the Center in commemoration of the Walker’s 75th anniversary as a public art center. It will remain on view here until March 29, 2015.

 

From the Archives: The Walker Curator Who Sparked a Red-Baiting Scandal

Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy is a new touring exhibition that sheds light on what one scholar called “one of the most infamous examples of red-baitingand censorship in the pre-McCarthy era United States”—and on the Walker’s first curator, J. Leroy Davidson, who was at the center of it all.

Late-Summer Recipes from Gather by D’Amico Chef Josh Brown

Make the most of the season with two new recipes created especially for at-home cooks by Josh Brown, executive chef at the Walker’s acclaimed restaurant Gather by D’Amico (you might also want to try the raw-and-cooked vegetable salad  that has become a popular mainstay on Gather’s lunch menu). For one dish, Brown paired the sweetness […]

Make the most of the season with two new recipes created especially for at-home cooks by Josh Brown, executive chef at the Walker’s acclaimed restaurant Gather by D’Amico (you might also want to try the raw-and-cooked vegetable salad  that has become a popular mainstay on Gather’s lunch menu).

For one dish, Brown paired the sweetness of a perfectly ripe, late-summer tomato with the creaminess of buratta in a salad that “is the essence of simple yet flavorful eating this time of year” he says, adding that buratta, made from mozzarella and cream,  is “one of the sexiest cheeses right now,” showing up on menus all over. “We pair it with buttermilk chicken, artichokes, chard, and sweet peas at Gather—and it’s a hit.”

His other recipe is a seasonal take on steak-and-potatoes: chili-crusted tenderloin with sweet corn risotto and green tomato chimichurri. “Add a few Negra Modelos or a Dos Equis and you’re set with the perfect Sunday night dinner.” 

BURATTA WITH HEIRLOOM TOMATO, WATERMELON, BAGUETTE AND ARUGULA PESTO

6 oz                  buratta, divided in one-ounce pieces

6 cups              heirloom or other top-quality tomato, diced

1 cup               watermelon, diced

3 T                   shallots, thinly sliced

1tsp                 fresh chili, thinly sliced (I like Serranos, but use your favorite)

2T                    fresh ginger juice (grate ginger; squeeze out juice; discard solids)

2T                    pine nuts, toasted

3T                    green onion, thinly sliced on a bias (both white and green parts are fine)

4T                    extra virgin olive oil

6                      baguette slices, grilled or toasted

Salt and pepper

Toss tomato, watermelon, shallot, ginger juice, pine nuts, green onion and olive oil in a bowl til everything is mixed evenly. Divide the salad between six bowls; top each with buratta and a baguette slice smothered in arugula pesto. Drizzle with olive oil; finish with fresh cracked pepper and sea salt.

Arugula pesto

2 cups             wild arugula

3                      garlic cloves, boiled in whole milk, strained, patted dry

3T                    toasted pine nuts

1T                    lemon zest

2T                    lemon juice

1/2 cup            fresh grated parmesan

1 cup               extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper

Puree all ingredients in a blender til fairly smooth; season with salt and pepper and refrigerate.

 

GRILLED TENDERLOIN WITH CORN RISOTTO AND GREEN TOMATO CHIMICHURRI

 

Tenderloin marinade

6                      tenderloin steaks, 7 oz each

1T                    salt

1 can               chipotle en adobo

4                      ancho chilis (soak in hot water for 10 minutes, remove)

3/4 cup            canola oil

1/2 cup            lime juice

Puree the salt, anchos, chipotle en adobo, lime juice in a blender. Slowly add oil to emulsify. Rub the tenderloins with the marinade and refrigerate for 4 to 6 hours. Grill to your preferred temperature.

 

Sweet corn risotto

2-1/2 cups       fresh corn kernels

1 cup               onion, diced small

4 T                   butter

7 cups              chicken stock (hot)

2 cups              Arborio rice

1 cup               white wine

1/2 cup            grated cotija cheese 

2 T                   chopped cilantro

2 T                   sliced green onions

4T                    butter

Sauté onions in butter on medium/medium-high heat til translucent. Add the rice, saute for 2-3 more minutes. Add 1/2 cup of white wine; cook, stirring constantly, til the wine is gone. Repeat with the other 1/2 cup of wine. Add chicken stock 1 cup at a time, stirring constantly and cooking til the stock is almost gone before adding another cup. Continue til the chicken stock is gone, about 20-25 minutes. (Constant stirring is the key to a creamy risotto, and to keep rice from sticking to pan bottom.) Turn off heat and stir in corn, cilantro, butter, and cheese til combined.

 

Green tomato chimichurri

1 cup               tomatillos, diced small

1T                    garlic, chopped

1T                    fresno chili or jalapeno, diced small

1/2 cup            chopped cilantro

1/2 cup            green onion sliced thin

1/4 cup            red wine vinegar

1/2 cup            extra virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp             kosher salt

Combine all ingredients in a bowl and let it sit for 30-45 minutes so the flavors can come together.

 

From the Archives: A tribute to Louise Walker McCannel (1915 – 2012)

Louise Walker McCannel, granddaughter of Walker founder Thomas Barlow Walker, played a critical role in the history of the Walker: both the private Walker Art Galleries and the public Walker Art Center. After graduating from Smith College in 1937, where she earned a degree in Fine Arts, Louise and her brother, Hudson, became the caretakers […]

Louise Walker McCannel, granddaughter of Walker founder Thomas Barlow Walker, played a critical role in the history of the Walker: both the private Walker Art Galleries and the public Walker Art Center. After graduating from Smith College in 1937, where she earned a degree in Fine Arts, Louise and her brother, Hudson, became the caretakers of the vast and varied art collection amassed by T.B. Walker. Louise was appointed director of the Walker Art Galleries and while Hudson left for New York in 1938, she stayed to help facilitate the Walker Art Galleries 1939 transition to the Walker Art Center. She worked at the new institution in many capacities: as director of the Children’s Gallery, editor of the Magazine of Art, and assistant curator.

Smith College yearbook photograph, 1937

As curator, she worked on the Walker’s extension program: educational outreach in the form of 36 small exhibitions that circulated throughout the state of Minnesota. These thematic shows—on jewelry, Chinese painting, and Ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt, and based on works in the T.B. Walker Collection—used portable panels for easy transport, a format that may seem old fashioned and quaint today, but was a very progressive form of outreach in 1940.

Louise Walker, far left, reviewing installation panels for the exhibition “Egypt, Greece, and Rome,” 1940.

 

“Egypt, Greece and Rome” exhibition panels in transport, 1940 (This photo and photo above: Rolphe Dauphin for Walker Art Center)

McCannel was instrumental in helping the Walker through its early years as an art center, and continued to serve on its board for more than 60 years. She was an active member from 1950 to 1997, and in 1998, after she became an honorary board member, continued to be a staunch supporter.

Louise, foreground, at a board meeting with Alma Walker and Justin Smith, 1950s (Photo: Eric Sutherland for Walker Art Center)

McCannel, in documentarian mode, films the 1969 demolition of the Walker Art Center building, which made way for the 1971 building designed by Edward Larabee Barnes. With her is longtime board member David M. Winton.

  McCannel’s work and her philanthropy extended far beyond the Walker, as well. In a story about her life in the Star Tribune, Walker director emeritus Martin Friedman, who worked with her over several decades, described her as “a fierce, no holds-barred liberal when it came to social causes. She was always on the side of the little guy. She had a great sense of community and was an enemy of anything that smacked of racism. She was really dedicated to making a better world.”

 Read the full Star Tribune story here, and McCannel’s obituary here

Louise Walker McCannel (This photo and photo above: Minneapolis Star Tribune)

 

 

 

 

Snap-Happy: Interns’ Photo Spree Around the Walker

What happens when you give a trio of Walker interns some new snazzy cameras and tell them to spend the day photographing? Last week, Ashley Monk, Chyna Bounds and I got to test-drive the new Pentax K-01 camera designed by Marc Newson, which just got stocked at Walker shop. After assembling the cameras, charging the batteries, and […]

What happens when you give a trio of Walker interns some new snazzy cameras and tell them to spend the day photographing? Last week, Ashley Monk, Chyna Bounds and I got to test-drive the new Pentax K-01 camera designed by Marc Newson, which just got stocked at Walker shop. After assembling the cameras, charging the batteries, and giving the manual/cheat sheet a quick read, we were ready for adventure.
 
We soon gave up on the instructions and opted for hands-on learning – this camera is that easy to use. Below is a small sampling of what we captured around the Walker. All images were uploaded straight from the camera, unaltered. Anything that looks edited is merely an example of the awesome powers of this camera. (See more images on Flickr in the Walker’s group pool.
Our first stop was the kitchen at Gather by D’Amico, where the chefs were hustling with preparations for lunch, but kindly accommodated us shutterbugs. Even though the images here were the very first ones using the camera, it made all of that food look extra delicious! 

 

Chyna

 
Kitchen at Gather by D’Amico by Ashley
 
 
Next, we meandered outside to the new boulders sculpture by Jim Hodges, which on a bright sunny day was intensely glowing, its colored mirror surfaces bouncing off of each other.
 
Jim Hodges’ outdoor sculpture by Chyna
Jim Hodges’ outdoor sculpture by Rachel
 
Jim Hodges’ outdoor sculpture by Ashley

 

Then it was down the hill to the Sculpture Garden next – of course, the iconic Spoon Bridge has to be part of the fun.

 

Minneapolis Sculpture Garden by Rachel
 
Minneapolis Sculpture Garden by Chyna
 
Minneapolis Sculpture Garden by Ashley
 
After our outdoor fun, we headed back inside for a quick, behind-the-scenes tour of the Walker’s underground studio, used by staff photographers Cameron Wittig and Gene Pittman.  

Studio by Rachel

 
 

Studio by Chyna

 
Studio by Ashley
 Although we took photos of the same things, with the Pentax’s amazing array of modes and options, we each took a different approach and came out with some wonderful images.

Come try this camera for yourself at the Walker Shop from 5-9pm this Thursday (May 10). Use it to capture a Minneapolis spring evening and get advice and tips from Pentax pros. The first 100 test photogs receive a free memory card and cocktail, compliments of Cool Hunting.

 

Gather by D’Amico’s Chef Josh Brown: best tastes of late summer

Coming on the heels of two new reviews for Gather (City Pages, Star Tribune),  this story was originally published in the September/October issue of Walker magazine; it’s accompanied by a recipe for chef Josh Brown’s raw-and-cooked vegetable salad. Besides the not-inconsiderable task of presiding over Gather by D’Amico, the Walker’s new restaurant that launched in June, chef Josh Brown […]

Coming on the heels of two new reviews for Gather (City PagesStar Tribune),  this story was originally published in the September/October issue of Walker magazine; it’s accompanied by a recipe for chef Josh Brown’s raw-and-cooked vegetable salad.

Besides the not-inconsiderable task of presiding over Gather by D’Amico, the Walker’s new restaurant that launched in June, chef Josh Brown has been tending a new vegetable plot at home—his first of any size since he was a kid in rural Montana. “Watching everything growing has definitely been a source of inspiration for Gather,” he says.

Recently he sat down to talk seasonal food and look toward the summer transition into fall. For Brown, tomatoes are “one last end-of-summer hurrah” that, as he points out, can be had until early October. Rather than fuss with this fruit, he prefers to let its sweetness stand out: “I just eat them with salt, pepper, and olive oil, or I make my wife’s favorite dish: pasta with fresh tomatoes, basil, olive oil, garlic, and parmesan. Of course, it only works with excellent tomatoes.” Leeks, another late-summer favorite that the chef enjoys braising and pairing with swordfish, also become available in late summer. As greens like chard and kale come into their own, he uses a simple preparation he picked up from a fellow cook: “Add salt and a pat of butter to boiling water before blanching your greens—the butter sticks to them and they’re delicious served with chicken or beef.”

Given the locally sourced and seasonal focus of Gather, Brown develops new dishes monthly as certain ingredients reach their peak. But the raw and cooked salad endures on the menu—not just because it’s one of his personal favorites, but because its components change depending on what’s freshest. “As summer ends, we’ll be trading out the beans and asparagus, probably with Brussels sprouts and a root vegetable,” he says.

As these items come into season, Brown turns on the oven. “Parsnips, turnips, kohlrabi, beets, and the like are really good as a hash, diced up small and slowroasted,” he says. Kohlrabi in particular, a lesser-known member of the cabbage family, takes him instantly back to that large garden of his childhood. “It has always stood out in my mind—something about the way it grows, watching my mother and grandmother picking it. Food sparks so many vivid memories for me; it’s one of the reasons I love cooking.”

Josh Brown’s Raw & Cooked Salad with Mustard Vinaigrette
Serves 2. As Brown notes, this salad can change based on what’s in season, so swap out and add in vegetables — the key is freshness. 

3      sliced asparagus spears, lightly blanched
3 oz   fennel and fennel fronds
2 oz      sliced radish
3 oz   sliced haricot vert, lightly blanched
1 oz    Hong Kong scallion
lemon vinaigrette (see below)
1 oz    ricotta salata
6 slices     soft boiled egg (see below)

Eggs: Cover eggs in cold water in a saucepan; bring to a boil and turn the heat off. Let stand for 7 minutes, then put eggs into an ice bath.

Lemon vinaigrette (makes extra)
1/2 c.      lemon juice
1T        lemon zest
1T       Dijon mustard
2T        minced shallot
1C       extra-virgin olive oil
3T        chopped basil

Mix lemon, zest,Dijon, and shallot in a bowl; whisk in the olive oil, then add basil and season with salt and pepper.

Plate set up: Salt and pepper the eggs and place in triangles on two plates. Toss all vegetables with vinaigrette and place on the plates; top with ricotta salata.

 

 

Sez Oprah: “everyone’s crazy about” International Klein Blue

The freight trucks arrived at the Walker last week and installation crews are currently installing Yves Klein’s first U.S. retrospective in more than 30 years, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, which opens here October 23. Meanwhile, thanks to the show’s acclaimed run at the Hirshhorn in Washington, D.C. — and fashion editors and […]

yves klein blue acessories

from "The Color of Style for Fall 2010," in the October issue of "O"

The freight trucks arrived at the Walker last week and installation crews are currently installing Yves Klein’s first U.S. retrospective in more than 30 years, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers, which opens here October 23. Meanwhile, thanks to the show’s acclaimed run at the Hirshhorn in Washington, D.C. — and fashion editors and stylists, whose long-range schedules are nicely in sync with the museum world’s — “International Klein Blue” has become the breakout hue for fall.

A sizable fashion-and-home spread in Oprah’s O magazine features an interview with Leatrice Eiseman, head of the Eiseman Center for Color Information and Training, who notes that IKB “has a luminous, intense quality that’s really striking. … You’re drawn into it, almost like you’re seeing a light illuminated through it. It’s magical, mystical, infinite, deep” — an observation that sounds strikingly similar to reviwers’ takes on Klein’s monochromes in the retrospective.

As with Oprah’s stylists in the image above, those at Anthropologie are also sprinkling IKB pigment around like so much fairy dust — or its close cousin, presuming they were unable to acquire Klein’s actual, patented IKB pigment. The picture below, from the Walker’s Shape of Time exhibition of works from the Walker collection, shows a trough of the true blue stuff, positioned in front of Klein’s Mondo Cane Shroud.

FYI, some lucky devils in this world have coffee tables made with vitrines full of (yes, patented) IKB pigment, as shown at Design Crisis, whose co-blogger Erin is “OBSESSED with Yves Klein and his badass blue.” She covered Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers here, but last March (i.e. months before the current Klein-o-rama), she also wrote a lengthy post on Klein and interior design, which she called “a labor of love. As in, I literally feel like I just squeezed out a giant blue baby” — a comment that must have had Klein dancing with delight somewhere in his blue heaven. After all, he liked to say that he “impregnated” visitors to one of his gallery openings with IKB, in the form of cocktails that carried his International Klein Blue out into the world, via their urine.

Moving back to fashion, the IKB trend also embraces looks for men; the following puzzling angle on Kleinian fashion from the “men’s clothing, men’s wear” blog may well be a result of a Google translation, but it does attempt a broader art-historical positioning of the artist:

2011 Spring Men's ten week point prevalence

Jil Sander

2011 Spring Men's ten week point prevalence

Prada

“In 1957, French artist Yifukelai because (Yves Klein) in Milan exhibition on display at the 8 same size , similar group of green pigments painted canvas – ” Klein Blue , ” an official appearance in front of the world . Since then, this color was officially named ” International Klein Blue “(International Klein Blue, called IKB). Looking around the spring and summer show season games Gucci handbags, all from Jil Sander to Prada Klein blue preference seems to have added a large number of blocks of color rendering , so the original white male models become more pale , sharp . Live to 34 -year-old Klein, June 6, 1962 in a heart attack . He is considered the most important representatives of Pop ArtFigureOne , and Andy Warhol (Andy Warhol), Marcel Duchamp (Marcel Duchamp) and Yuesefubo AES (Joseph Beuys) , together known as the second half of the 20th century the greatest contribution to world arts The four artists”

The Walker’s  design director, Emmet Byrne, has been digging up more on this storied and celebrated hue — watch the design blog for a series of upcoming posts on the topic.

What does it take to spiff-up the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden?

  During Minnesota’s 2010 legislative session, the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board—with the full support of the Walker Art Center—made a request to the legislature for funding to restore and preserve the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. The project did not make it through the bonding process this year for a variety of reasons, but it did […]

 

During Minnesota’s 2010 legislative session, the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board—with the full support of the Walker Art Center—made a request to the legislature for funding to restore and preserve the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. The project did not make it through the bonding process this year for a variety of reasons, but it did draw attention to the need for a renovation of this 22-year-old gem, a centerpiece of the Minneapolis park system. It also stirred up a group of grassroots supporters—both park and art lovers—who sent a clear message to legislators.

So what’s going on with the Sculpture Garden that needs spiffing up? It’s not the sorts of things that make for great photo ops, like brightening the cherry atop Spoonbridge and Cherry with fresh coats of paint, or Windexing the mirrored scales of Frank Gehry’s fish in the Cowles Conservatory.

In fact, the work involved in renovating a landscape or garden is most always quite subtle — less visible or even invisible — but it’s nonetheless important, even crucial. The pictures here zoom in on some of the ways that more than two decades — and the enjoyment of more than 7 million visitors — have taken their toll on the Garden.

For starters, the linden trees in the image at left would be trimmed to open up views and create the kind of experience intended by the original design. Another experience involves what’s underfoot: If you’ve walked around the Garden in the springtime after the snow has melted or after a heavy rain, you’ve probably noticed how muddy and squishy it is. That’s because the green spaces currently lack adequate drainage and the pathways were originally installed with baseball diamond clay. 

A renovation would include a cistern to collect water runoff so the Park Board can keep the Garden watered in a sustainable way, plus pathways would be resurfaced and replaced with porous materials that would dry more quickly. (While the current odds are already negligible, chances of catching an errant baseball are reduced as well.) Other work on the pond and lawns would prevent storm water pollution, improve filtration and reduce off-site drainage and overall water use.

 

Many trees in the Garden, including the arbor vitae "walls" of its four "galleries," are at the end of their natural life cycles.

The same goes for some of the evergreen border trees.

Granite slabs used for paving, walls, and steps need re-setting, replacement or repair.

Existing wheelchair ramps would be made compliant with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (the Garden opened in 1988), with wider clearance and a gentler slope.

Lighting for evening strolls will be brighter and more energy efficient, new emergency call stations will be installed, and the HVAC/mechanical systems in the Cowles Conservatory would be updated, drastically reducing energy use (and operating expenses). And dying or dead trees would be replaced with live, healthy ones. (Hey, why not?)

Even if you’re not a landscape architect, HVAC technician, or soil specialist, you can help restore the Garden by becoming an advocate. We are building our initial group of supporters into a strong, statewide collection of voices who can help by doing a couple easy things — like contacting legislators at times when it will make the biggest impact (we’ll cue you). Find out more here, and  sign up for the Action E-List today.

Renovating the Sculpture Garden: NOW is the time to weigh in

I’ve recently started work at the Walker as its grassroots coordinator, advocating for the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board’s legislative bonding request to restore and preserve the 22-year-old Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. (If you have yet to show your support for the project, please visit http://garden.walkerart.org/bonding  to learn more and to write your legislator.) As part […]

I’ve recently started work at the Walker as its grassroots coordinator, advocating for the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board’s legislative bonding request to restore and preserve the 22-year-old Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. (If you have yet to show your support for the project, please visit http://garden.walkerart.org/bonding  to learn more and to write your legislator.) As part of this effort, I’ve been keeping close track of goings-on at the Capitol — which are especially fascinating this year — and also, of course, tracking where the Sculpture Garden bonding request fits within the overall legislative process.

Which bonding projects are being funded?

Bonding projects, in part, are being selected this year because of the jobs they will create both for the project and following its completion, as well as the “shovel readiness” of the effort. The Sculpture Garden renovation is one such project: most of the work would be completed in 2010; it would generate 170 construction and landscaping jobs (90%+ being union labor); and preserve one of Minnesota’s iconic tourist destinations (45% of visitors are tourists, who bring $16 million in direct tourist spending into the economy each year). (Read more details in this previous blog post.)

So, in an effort to get bonding projects underway and get folks back to work as soon as possible, the ordinary legislative process for introducing a bonding bill started quite early, and has been put on a fast track.

What does “fast-track” mean when it comes to the state legislature?

A legislative process that normally takes months is being compressed into just a few weeks—which makes public input and action all the more crucial. This past week was an important one, as both the House and Senate Capital Investment committees submitted their bills. The good news is that the Sculpture Garden renovation is in both bills; the bad news is that the commitments to the project so far are well below what is necessary to preserve our Minnesota landmark. The Sculpture Garden renovation’s full request was $8.5 million; the House and Senate submitted bills with bonding support at $200,000 and $2 million respectively. 

So what happens now?

In the next week a 10-member House-Senate conference committee will be assembled that will likely begin convening on Tuesday, February 16. This conference committee reports back to the floors of both the House and Senate within a couple days with their recommendations on how to reconcile the two proposals. The entire legislature then votes on the bill and sends it to the Governor.

In the end, the process for a bonding bill is like a “Which Way” Book: It’s nearly impossible to predict the outcome. That said, during critical junctures—like the coming weeks—the chances of success at the legislature are increased dramatically when constituents from all over the state weigh in.

Show Your Support!

It’s especially important to make your voice heard—now—regarding the bonding measure to restore the Sculpture Garden. The legislative process is hard, but advocacy is easy.  Write your legislators today! It will only take a minute using our online email tool, but that minute could make all the difference in the bonding approval process. We need to preserve our iconic Minnesota garden with a cherry on top!

 

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