Blogs Centerpoints Around the Twin Cities

Our Picks for Give to the Max Day 2016

Today is Give to the Max Day, a 24-hour event sponsored by GiveMN.org in support of Minnesota’s schools and nonprofits. More than a day of marathon donating, Give to the Max provides individuals with an opportunity to appreciate the generous, vital philanthropic community in the Twin Cities. In that spirit, Walker staff members have shared some […]

Today is Give to the Max Day, a 24-hour event sponsored by GiveMN.org in support of Minnesota’s schools and nonprofits. More than a day of marathon donating, Give to the Max provides individuals with an opportunity to appreciate the generous, vital philanthropic community in the Twin Cities. In that spirit, Walker staff members have shared some of their favorite nonprofit organizations that support the arts in Minnesota. The Walker Art Center is proud to work with many of the remarkable nonprofits that invigorate the local arts community. Check out our picks for Give to the Max Day 2016 and happy donating!

Cedar Cultural Center

The Cedar Cultural Center

Established  in 1989 in Minneapolis’s Cedar-Riverside neighborhood, this nonprofit venue hosts a wide variety of global music and dance performances—in addition to supporting artist residencies, screening films, and presenting comedy, spoken word, and community events. A longtime partner with the Walker, we’ll be co-presenting several concerts with the Cedar this spring, including Mbongwana Star on March 3 and Kneedelus, a live collaboration between Kneebody and Daedelus, on March 24.

GIVE 

Suggested by Molly Hanse, Performing Arts

DanceMN

DanceMN

DanceMN is an artist-driven resource designed to connect, educate, and publicize dance services and information in the Twin Cities and statewide. Presented by Springboard for the Arts, DanceMN supports local dance artists by sharing news of upcoming performances, workshops, master classes, and auditions.

GIVE 

Suggested by Anat Shinar, Performing Arts

 IFP MN

Independent Filmmaker Project

The Independent Filmmaker Project promotes a vibrant and diverse community of independent film and media artists through networking, educational programs, and providing funding and screening opportunities. With the end goal of creating a healthy and viable filmmaking community in Minnesota, IFP sponsors screenings, workshops, and fellowships. Beginning in January, IFP Minnesota in coordination with the Walker will be presenting and the Walker Art Center screenings of Independent Spirit Awards–nominated films.

GIVE 

Suggested by Emily Gastineau, Education and Public Programs

 

Interact Center

Interact Center

Founded in 1996, the Interact Center is dedicated to providing studio and performing arts opportunities for artists with disabilities ages 18 and up, supporting them as they pursue a creative career. The Center’s radical inclusion of these disabled artists encourages them to challenge perceptions of disability through art, enriching the Twin Cities artistic offerings by sharing their diverse experiences. This November will see Interact’s theatrical ensemble production of the play What Fools These Mortals Be, as well as the organization’s 20th-anniversary celebration.

GIVE 

Suggested by Julia Anderson, Education and Public Programs

 

Ka Joog

Ka Joog

Ka Joog aims to motivate Somali youth to achieve higher levels of education and civic engagement by offering community-based, culturally specific programs and services to them and their families. Their FANKA arts program hosts workshops in music, storytelling, painting, and sculpture, encouraging youth to dive into Somali artistic traditions and to empower one another through art.  2016 projects include the production of a touring play, Chronicles of the Diaspora, and a documentary in partnership with local PBS station TPT and the Somali Museum titled Somalia: A Nation of Poets.

GIVE 

Suggested by Maya Weisinger, Education and Public Programs

 

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Kulture Klub Collaborative

The Kulture Klub Collaborative provides enriching multidisciplinary opportunities in the arts for youth experiencing homelessness. KKC brings together homeless youth and local artist to work on transforming the community through workshops, open mics, artist residencies, and art outings. Allowing artists to grow and enact change, the KKC brings dignity and respect to homeless youth. All donations that Kulture Klub receives from this year’s Give to the Max will be going directly to enact strategies for minimizing barriers to youth participation in the arts, funding transportation, food, and child care assistance.

GIVE 

Suggested by Ashley Duffalo, Design/Editorial

 

NAZ

Northside Achievement Zone

Northside Achievement Zone operates as both an organization and a collaborative of more than 40 service providers and schools, supported through a public-private partnership. With the mission of eradicating educational and social disparities in the North Minneapolis community, NAZ focuses on closing the academic achievement gap for low-income children of color and preparing those students and families for college. Early childhood education, K–12, and after-school and summer programming set students on the track to college while enriching their experience with the arts.

GIVE (Direct donations here.)

Suggested by Maya Weisinger, Education and Public Programs

 Soap Factory

The Soap Factory

Housed in the historic National Purity Soap Company building, the Soap Factory is a contemporary art gallery that serves as a laboratory for artistic experimentation and innovation. The Soap is dedicated to supporting artists and engaging audiences in discussion by provide funding, development and exhibition space for new work. On view through December 18 are the 2016 submissions show Working Forces and the single-artist exhibition Mathew Zefeldt: Desktop.

GIVE 

Suggested by Emily Gastineau, Education and Public Programs

Two Rivers Gallery

Two Rivers Gallery

Two Rivers Gallery serves as the arts and cultural resource department of the Minneapolis American Indian Center, which was one of the first urban American Indian centers in the country to provide educational and social services when established in 1974. Seeking to preserve and support American Indian cultural traditions, MAIC organizes youth and intergenerational programs in the arts and presents the work of Native artists in the Two Rivers Gallery. On view through November 25 is the exhibition Dakota Isanti: Reclaiming Identity.

GIVE 

Suggested by Molly Hanse, Performing Arts

(Not So) Set in Stone: Zoran Mojsilov Repurposes Sculpture Garden Materials

In light of the renovation of the 19-acre Walker Art Center/Minneapolis Sculpture Garden campus, here’s a spotlight on a local artist who is giving new life to some of the Garden’s original materials. Since the mid-1990s Twin Cities–based artist Zoran Mojsilov has been fashioning large-scale sculptures out of discarded stones salvaged from construction and renovation sites, […]

Stones from the Garden set out in formation at Mojsilov’s studio near the Grain Belt Brewery in July 2016.

Stones from the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden in formation at artist Zoran Mojsilov’s studio near the Grain Belt Brewery in July 2016

In light of the renovation of the 19-acre Walker Art Center/Minneapolis Sculpture Garden campus, here’s a spotlight on a local artist who is giving new life to some of the Garden’s original materials.

Since the mid-1990s Twin Cities–based artist Zoran Mojsilov has been fashioning large-scale sculptures out of discarded stones salvaged from construction and renovation sites, and one of his newest projects features material reclaimed from the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. (more…)

Campus Renovation Update: Sculptures Move to Gold Medal Park

In preparation for the renovation of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden and Cowles Conservatory, some of the Garden’s most beloved art is finding a temporary home. This week three favorites make their debut in Gold Medal Park, in downtown Minneapolis just adjacent the Guthrie Theater: Brower Hatcher’s Prophecy of the Ancients (1988), Mark di Suvero’s Molecule […]

goldmedal In preparation for the renovation of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden and Cowles Conservatory, some of the Garden’s most beloved art is finding a temporary home. This week three favorites make their debut in Gold Medal Park, in downtown Minneapolis just adjacent the Guthrie Theater: Brower Hatcher’s Prophecy of the Ancients (1988), Mark di Suvero’s Molecule (1977–1983), and Tony Cragg’s Ordovician Pore (1989).

Other works from the Garden have already gone into storage, but additional sculptures will be moving to guest venues this fall. Jacques Lipchitz’s Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II (1944/1953) will be on view at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and Frank Gehry’s Standing Glass Fish (1986) will find a home in the Gehry-designed Weisman Art Museum on the University of Minnesota campus in early winter of 2015. The iconic Spoonbridge and Cherry (1985–1988) by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen will remain on view in the Garden until spring 2016, when full construction begins, as will Richard Serra’s Five Plates, Two Poles (1971) and Sol LeWitt’s X with Columns (1996). The sculpture garden improvements are part of a broader plan to renovate and unify the entire 19-acre Walker campus, an ambitious project that involves the construction of a new entry pavilion for the Walker, a new green space on the Walker hillside, and the greening of Hennepin Avenue.

Walker Director Olga Viso captured these shots of works by Hatcher and di Suvero in their new environs:

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Walker Registrar Joe King took these snaps of Prophecy of the Ancients’ move, while our friends at the Guthrie posted a quick video of Molecule arriving at its new home.

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Learn more about progress on the Walker/Minneapolis Sculpture Garden renovation project.

In 1976, a Dystopian River and Inflatable “Plumes of Fire”

American muralist Terry Schoonhoven was commissioned by the Walker Art Center to create his mural No River Wall Painting for the 1976 exhibition The River: Images of the Mississippi. It loomed large—24 by 35 feet—and foreboding in the Walker’s outer lobby, depicting the riverfront as dystopian industrial district, going to rack and ruin in mounding […]

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Trevor Schoonhoven, No River Wall Painting, 1976

American muralist Terry Schoonhoven was commissioned by the Walker Art Center to create his mural No River Wall Painting for the 1976 exhibition The River: Images of the Mississippi. It loomed large—24 by 35 feet—and foreboding in the Walker’s outer lobby, depicting the riverfront as dystopian industrial district, going to rack and ruin in mounding decay, a parched riverbed supporting barges going nowhere and tipped oil drums lodged in the scorched silt. Meanwhile, just off in the distance, gleaming new city buildings emerge—reaching up and away from the riverfront and the industry of the past.

It must have been an eerie experience gazing upon this almost-life size view of the “Mighty Mississippi” looking so miserable. Schoonhoven and The Fine Arts Squad, which he co-founded, had a knack for creating fantasy environments which enticed the viewer with their potential reality. The riverbed depicted here is a scene from a dark dream but one that must have resonated at the time, as environmental concerns were fueling a rapidly growing ecology movement in the 1970s.

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Schoonhoven sketch

In this preliminary sketch, also included in the exhibition, Schoonhoven includes these notes: “Dry river view. Sky cool and metallic. Looks like it’s imported from another planet. Mississippi river bed cracked, features similar to area around Badwater in Death Valley. Evidence of drifting land, sand flats. Clear brilliant light. The Los Angeles river would feel right at home here.”

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Schoonhoven preliminary sketch

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Terry Schoonhoven working on No River Wall Painting in the Walker lobby, 1976

Another highlight of The River exhibition, albeit brief, was Otto Piene’s Black Stacks Helium Sculpture. It was commissioned by the Walker and installed on October 30, 1976, at the Northern States Power (NSP) South East Steam Plant (located at S.E. Main Street and 6th Avenue).

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Otto Piene

Otto Piene, then director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was on hand for the installation of this work of “Sky Art,” a term he coined in 1969 and which allowed him to use landscape and cities themselves as the focal point of his work.

The entire installation process of the four 300-foot-long red helium-filled balloons was estimated at three to five hours. The streamers, three feet in diameter, were to be pumped up every two days for as long as they would last, an expected two weeks.

1976 Helium Stacks install_001

Lisa Lyons, a Walker assistant curator at the time, recalls a meeting with then-Walker director Martin Friedman and officials at NSP about using the stacks: “After looking at Otto’s preliminary drawings, they were concerned that the big red balloons issuing from the top of the disused stacks would call to mind smoke and pollution. But ultimately, they signed on, and the piece was installed without a hitch, until, that is, someone took aim at it.”

Originally scheduled to be on view through November 13, vandals shot three of the four streamers full of holes within the first days of the installation. The work was not reinstalled.

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Article from the Minneapolis Tribune, November 1, 1976

“An inflatable sculpture that was installed Saturday on the smokestacks of a power plant had been shot full of holes by vandals by Sunday afternoon, according to Walker Art Center spokespersons,” read a news story in the Minneapolis paper. “Of the original four 300-foot-long, red helium-filled balloons only one was floating yesterday from the stacks of the NSP Co. steam plant at Main St. and 16th Ave SE. The work by Otto Piene had been commissioned by the Walker Art Center in conjunction with its exhibit called The River: Images of the Mississippi.”

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Black Stacks Helium Sculpture by Otto Piene

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Black Stacks Helium Sculpture by Otto Piene

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Black Stacks Helium Sculpture by Otto Piene

Martin Friedman, Walker director from 1961 to 1990, described them as abstract plumes of fire.

Opening day cake for the 1976 exhibition, The River: Images of the Mississippi

The exhibition ran from October 3, 1976 to June 9, 1977. And of course, there was a cake for the opening.

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An issue of Design Quarterly was dedicated to the exhibition

Mickey Friedman wrote in the exhibition’s catalogue:

“River imagery is explored in this exhibition as it exists in painting, prints, photography, maps and, indirectly, as it occurs in planning and architecture. Though architecture does not immediately reflect an image of a river, the character and course of the waterway affects the forms and functions of architecture related to it and conversely, future river imagery may be the consequence of architectural proposals made today.”

Her opening paragraph foretold the future. Schoonhoven’s noir-ish view of the riverfront gratefully did not come to pass. Crossing the Stone Arch Bridge today offers a cityscape that took decades to form and was indeed the consequence of conversations and proposals that had begun in the 1970s and ’80s. Instead of warning people away from its banks with mounds of aggregate and earth-moving machines, the river now invites exploration, into its present amenities as well as its stories from the past, and is the “next frontier” in Minneapolis’ nationally known parks system.

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Riverfront 2014 photo by Barb Economon

For more moments from the Walker’s 75 years as a public art center, visit our Walker@75 page.

Jade Mountain Returns

October 3 marked a homecoming, albeit temporary, for a beloved work of art: long part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ collection, Jade Mountain was installed in the galleries for the October 16 opening of Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections. Its history with the Walker goes back more than 100 years […]

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Walker and MIA art handlers install Jade Mountain in Art at the Center

October 3 marked a homecoming, albeit temporary, for a beloved work of art: long part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts’ collection, Jade Mountain was installed in the galleries for the October 16 opening of Art at the Center: 75 Years of Walker Collections. Its history with the Walker goes back more than 100 years to the museum’s founder, Thomas Barlow Walker.

Jade Mountain Illustrating the Gathering of Scholars at the Lanting Pavillion (1784), carved from light green jade in Qing Dynasty China, chronicles members of an ancient literary society as they celebrate the Spring Purification Festival alongside a stream in Shaoxing. As curators explained on the joint Walker/MIA website ArtsConnectEd: “The scholars engaged in a drinking contest: Wine cups were floated down a small winding creek as the men sat along its banks; whenever a cup stopped, the man closest to the cup was required to empty it and write a poem. In the end, 26 of the participants composed 37 poems. Wang Xizhi was asked to write an introduction to the collection of these poems.” That poem, transcribed by Emperor Ch’ein-lung, appears on Jade Mountain.

The work, the largest jade carving outside of China, was brought to the United States by Herbert Squiers, who served as Secretary of the U. S. Delegation in Peking (Beijing) until 1901. Squiers donated much of his collection of Chinese jade and porcelain to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but after his death in 1912 the remainder was put up for auction. T.B. Walker’s top bid of $4,000 brought the work to Minneapolis. Included in a “time capsule” within Art at the Center, Jade Mountain is presented in front of a photographic reproduction of Walker’s mansion, where the the 640-pound sculpture is visible on a table. The work was part of Walker’s collection through his death in 1928, his gallery’s reopening as a public art center in 1940, and throughout much of the Walker Art Center’s modern history. In 1976 Jade Mountain went on long-term loan to the MIA, and over the ensuing decade negotiations led to the permanent transfer of its ownership to the MIA. The MIA generously agreed to lend this spectacular piece for Art at the Center in commemoration of the Walker’s 75th anniversary as a public art center. It will remain on view here until March 29, 2015.

 

Myron Kunin: A Tribute

While the Walker prepares to host a dialogue with director Steve McQueen as part of the Dialogues and Film Retrospectives series, it also marks the passing of one of the series’ greatest patrons. Myron Kunin, founder of Regis Corp., died last week, leaving behind a remarkable legacy of contribution to art in the Twin Cities. […]

A selection of the filmmakers who have taken part in the Dialogues and Film Retrospectives series at the Walker. Top, left to right: Claire Denis, Julian Schnabel, Frederick Wiseman, Ang Lee, Steve McQueen Middle, left to right: Miloš Forman, Jessica Lange, Noah Baumbach, Stan Brakhage, Apichatpong 'Joe' Weerasethakul Bottom, left to right: Agnieszka Holland, Abbas Kiarostami, Spike Lee, Kelly Reichardt, Agnès Varda

A selection of the filmmakers who have taken part in the Dialogues and Film Retrospectives series at the Walker.
Top, left to right: Claire Denis, Julian Schnabel, Frederick Wiseman, Ang Lee, Steve McQueen
Middle, left to right: Miloš Forman, Jessica Lange, Noah Baumbach, Stan Brakhage, Apichatpong ‘Joe’ Weerasethakul
Bottom, left to right: Agnieszka Holland, Abbas Kiarostami, Spike Lee, Kelly Reichardt, Agnès Varda

While the Walker prepares to host a dialogue with director Steve McQueen as part of the Dialogues and Film Retrospectives series, it also marks the passing of one of the series’ greatest patrons. Myron Kunin, founder of Regis Corp., died last week, leaving behind a remarkable legacy of contribution to art in the Twin Cities. In addition to funding the Walker’s film dialogue and retrospective series for almost two decades, Kunin served as a board chairman and life trustee of the Minneapolis Institute of Art (MIA), sponsored the Northern Clay Center, and helped fund the University of Minnesota’s Regis Center for the Arts. An avid collector, he also amassed a notable collection of early 20th century American art, including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe, Stuart Davis, and Andrew Wyeth. Two hundred and thirty artworks from Kunin’s collection are included in his gifts to the MIA.

A conversation between Clint Eastwood and Richard Schickel launched the Walker’s Dialogues and Film Retrospective series in 1990, with support from the MacArthur Foundation. Kunin’s Regis Foundation took over funding in 1994, and Kunin has sponsored the series up to the present. Thanks to 19 years of generous support from Kunin and his wife, Anita, the Walker has presented conversations with over forty directors, artists, auteurs, and screen actors, including Claire Denis, Ang Lee, Béla Tarr, and Matthew Barney. The series has provided a space for some of the leading filmmakers of our time to discuss their creative processes, influences, and works as well as premiering and previewing dozens of contemporary films. Most recently, the Walker hosted the regional premier of Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave, and the accompanying dialogue between McQueen and MoMA curator Stuart Comer will be held on November 9. “Appreciation of Myron’s longstanding support of this dialogue series, which allowed us to share the world’s greatest filmmakers with our community for nearly 20 years, is deeply felt by all of us,” said Sheryl Mousley, the Walker’s senior curator of film and video.

Kunin’s support for film at the Walker and for the broader Twin Cities arts community has made a profound impact on both institutions and individuals. In the words of the Walker’s executive director Olga Viso, “Mike was fiercely passionate about collecting as well as the power of film to communicate and we will miss that energy and faith here at the Walker.” We extend our condolences to Anita, the entire Kunin family, and their friends. Myron Kunin will be deeply missed.

Scenes from Station to Station in St. Paul

Station to Station, the “polyphonic culture train” spearheaded by artist Doug Aitken, made its way to St. Paul Thursday night. While the locomotive itself was nowhere to be seen — it was parked at Midway Station — a train of artists made its way to the stage and throughout the expansive station. Four yurts outside […]

A peek inside Kenneth Anger's yurt, where Anger's Lucifer Rising was screening.

A peek inside Kenneth Anger’s yurt, where Anger’s Lucifer Rising was screening. All photos by Paul Schmelzer

Station to Station, the “polyphonic culture train” spearheaded by artist Doug Aitken, made its way to St. Paul Thursday night. While the locomotive itself was nowhere to be seen — it was parked at Midway Station — a train of artists made its way to the stage and throughout the expansive station. Four yurts outside greeted around a thousand visitors, while inside, art, drink, and music were the fare. Here’s a look — including a clip of Patti Smith’s headlining performance — of what you missed.

Linking the Walker's Fritz Haeg exhibition with Station to Station, the BodyCartography Project performed with yields from Haeg's gardens in and around the Union Depot.

Linking the Walker’s Fritz Haeg exhibition with Station to Station, the BodyCartography Project performed with yields from Haeg’s gardens in and around the Union Depot.

Minneapolis-based artist Kate Casanova with American FWKErj, a Pacer with mushrooms growing from its upholstered seats

Minneapolis-based artist Kate Casanova with Vivarium Americana, a 1976 AMC Pacer she turned into a terrarium that grows oyster mushrooms from the upholstery.

Juliette Brungs, dancer/choreographer Patrick Scully, and BodyCartography Project founders Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad.

Juliette Brungs, dancer/choreogrpher Patrick Scully, and BodyCartography Project founders Olive Bieringa and Otto Ramstad.

Lawrence Weiner designed flags for each of Station to Station's stops. Here's what he came up with for St. Paul.

Lawrence Weiner designed flags for each of Station to Station’s stops. Here’s what he came up with for St. Paul.

Ariel Pink, who later performed on the Station to Station stage.

Ariel Pink, who later performed on the Station to Station stage.

Vendors included The Beez Kneez, a Minneapolis-based honey producer, which delivers its wares on bikes. Pictured, Kristy Lynn Allen.

Vendors included The Beez Kneez, a Minneapolis-based honey producer that delivers its wares via bicycle. Pictured: Kristy Lynn Allen.

Inside the yurt designed by Ernesto Neto.

Inside the yurt designed by Ernesto Neto.

Minneapolis' Mark Mallman, prior to joining Patti Smith and her son Jackson on stage. “I didn’t get their names,” Smith said of her local bandmates, which included Mallman and Gary Louris.

Minneapolis’ Mark Mallman, prior to joining Patti Smith and her son Jackson on stage. “I didn’t get their names,” Smith said of her local bandmates, which included Mallman and Gary Louris.

No Age's Randy Randall playing guitar with a drumstick.

No Age’s Randy Randall playing guitar with a drumstick.

Chicago's White Mystery, the brother/sister team of  Miss Alex White and Francis Scott Key White.

Chicago’s White Mystery, the brother/sister team of Miss Alex White and Francis Scott Key White.

Patti Smith, performing a powerful cover of Neil Young's "It's a Dream."

Patti Smith’s powerful lo-fi performance included a cover of Neil Young’s “It’s a Dream” (see video below).

Patt Smith at Union Depot, St. Paul from Eyeteeth on Vimeo.

Culture and Nature: Station to Station’s Video Portrait of Minneapolis/St. Paul

Next month, a nine-car train departs from New York bound for Oakland. Dubbed a “nomadic happening,” the train will be part traveling fun show, part kinetic art project, and part broadcast beacon, beaming ideas about art, music, and culture around the world. The brainchild of artist Doug Aitken, Station to Station is making a stop […]

Next month, a nine-car train departs from New York bound for Oakland. Dubbed a “nomadic happening,” the train will be part traveling fun show, part kinetic art project, and part broadcast beacon, beaming ideas about art, music, and culture around the world. The brainchild of artist Doug Aitken, Station to Station is making a stop at St. Paul’s Union Depot September 12, for a night of art, music, and film benefiting the Walker. In a multimedia essay, Wired’s Clive Thompson writes of Aitken’s goal for the project:

To make art that’s simultaneously physical and virtual, local and global, broadcast using a mashup of the Internet and one of the oldest networks in the US, the steel rails. If Song1 was liquid architecture, this is practically a plasma. “We’re living in a new topography,” Aitken says. “Is it possible to be everywhere and nowhere?”

But while placelessness — being everywhere and nowhere — is part of the aim, so is rootedness. In anticipation of this epic rail ride, the team behind Station to Station is producing video portraits of the cities hosting the train’s stops. Released today is the Minneapolis/St. Paul edition, featuring footage of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, the Walker galleries, and Rock the Garden 2013, as well as an interview with Walker executive director Olga Viso, who explains the unique nature-meets-culture identity of the Twin Cities.

“People belief things are possible, and that’s a fertile place for art to really flourish,” says Viso. “There’s a great love of doing things collectively. There’s  a strong sense of communal pride, this wanting to come together and gather, and to make things happen. And obviously music and art are central to what makes people come together and appreciate both culture and nature.”

Tom Crosby: A Tribute

It’s fair to say the Walker–and, indeed, downtown Minneapolis–might not look the way it does today without the influence of Tom Crosby, who passed away Sunday at age 74 after a battle with pancreatic cancer. A board member for 45 years, Crosby was close advisor to three Walker directors, served as president of the board […]

Roger Hale (currently an Honorary Trustee), Martin Friedman (currently Director Emeritus), Justin V. Smith (a Walker family member and former president of the T.B. Walker Foundation), Walter Walker (a Walker family member and the late husband to current board member Elaine), and Tom Crosby, with paperwork making the Walker a truly public institution, 1976. Photo: Walker Art Center Archives

Roger Hale (currently an honorary trustee), Martin Friedman (director emeritus), Justin V. Smith (a Walker family member and former president of the T.B. Walker Foundation), Walter Walker (a Walker family member and the late husband to current board member Elaine), and Tom Crosby, with paperwork making the Walker a truly public institution, July 30, 1976. Photo: Walker Art Center Archives

It’s fair to say the Walker–and, indeed, downtown Minneapolis–might not look the way it does today without the influence of Tom Crosby, who passed away Sunday at age 74 after a battle with pancreatic cancer. A board member for 45 years, Crosby was close advisor to three Walker directors, served as president of the board of trustees at key moments in the Walker’s history, and contributed, with his wife Ellie, generously to help the Walker realize some of its most important projects, from the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden in 1988 to the Herzog & de Meuron expansion in 2005, the 2012 exhibition Lifelike to our current project restoring the building’s façade, to name but a few. Throughout nearly five decades, Crosby was at the center of many of the Walker’s biggest moments.

The great grandson of John Crosby, a founder of General Mills Corporation, Crosby specialized in real estate law, becoming a partner, and later managing partner, at Faegre & Benson (now Faegre Baker Daniels). He joined the Walker board of trustees in 1967 and quickly grew close to then-director Martin Friedman. He was president of the board in 1976 when the T.B. Walker Foundation agreed to transfer $27 million to the Walker Art Center, an important moment that brought more community members into Walker governance, making the institution a fully public museum.

The Crosby family’s generous giving to the Walker’s Annual Fund helped make recent exhibitions–including Sol LeWitt:  2D+3D and 1964–possible, and the couple’s gifts of artwork–including Ellsworth Kelly’s 2001 lithograph Dark Blue–have bolstered the Walker’s collection (this summer the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden will see the installation of a new sculpture, the conceptual work, For Whom, by Kris Martin, which the Crosbys and other Walker board members purchased on the Walker’s behalf and in honor of Friedman). And in coming years, it will help reinvent the Walker’s four-acre green space, host to Rock the Garden and Open Field. Active since his first moments with the Walker, Crosby served as chair of a range of committees over the years–from Government Relations to the Park Board–as well as serving as president, vice president, and chair of the Walker board. He also ensured the solid legal counsel of his firm.

The neighborhoods abutting the Walker and Minneapolis Sculpture Garden have also been transformed with Crosby’s help. Active in downtown commercial real estate, Crosby was involved with the acquisition, financing, and disposition of major Twin Cities properties such as the IDS Center, Baker Center, and Minneapolis City Center. He also served on the board of directors of Oxford Development Group Limited, a real estate developer with major downtown projects in several Canadian cities and in the Twin Cities, Denver, Chicago, and Los Angeles.

Crosby’s civic enthusiasm extended to other organizations and municipalities where he shared his passions and skills. The mayor of Medina just prior to his death, and a past city council member there, he served on the boards of Greater Twin Cities United Way, The Minnesota Orchestral Association,  The Blake School, and Abbott-Northwestern Hospital, among others.

But it’s Crosby’s personal counsel, on issues of varying degrees of magnitude, that will most be missed by those of us who knew him through the Walker.

“Tom was always the voice of calm and reason, even in the most difficult situations,” notes Olga Viso, executive director of the Walker. “I so appreciated how his mind worked–his probing questions, how he could parse and dissect the relevant issues, and the way he always kept the highest possible end goal and aspiration in mind. He was absolutely brilliant at finding solutions that worked for everyone, and he was especially savvy at finding ways to confidently realize challenging artistic projects in public space, even if they might at times test the bounds of state or city ordinances!”

“During my first weekend living in Minneapolis, Tom and his wife Ellie invited me to their home,” she recalls. “I will never forget the subzero temps that Sunday morning in January as they took me on a hay ride around their gorgeous property.  While I at first thought that he might be testing my fortitude in those first days as director, I knew when he and Ellie handed me a pair of wool mittens with warmers inside that he would be a great friend and partner.”

The Walker’s past directors concur. “Tom was always at your side when you needed him, personally and professionally,” says emeritus director Friedman. “He was devoted to the Walker and saw us through many a crisis. He is irreplaceable.”

“Tom was two things which are becoming increasingly rare: a great citizen and a thoughtful friend,” says Kathy Halbreich, Walker director from 1991 to 2007 (now associate director at the Museum of Modern Art). “He just had a natural gift for knowing the right set of questions regardless of whatever the dilemma. He never panicked and always answered with what I initially thought was common sense and came to understand was wisdom delivered without pride.”

She recalls an incident when a conservative group had singled out books for sale in the Walker Shop as pornography. “His response was to ask where else the books were sold which, after a couple ofhours of research, turned out to be quite a comprehensive list including the Harvard co-op,” she recalls. “Tom and Ellie even got me to go camping. Once. Good friend, great guide, indispensable civic leader. Both Walker and I are in his debt.”

We extend our sympathies to Ellie and the entire Crosby family, their friends, and all those touched by Tom Crosby’s remarkable life. He will be missed.

 

“Vote No”: A Walker Family Photo

The Walker has been vocal about its opposition to a constitutional amendment on the Minnesota ballot today that would restrict the definition of marriage as between a man and a woman. We join more than 120 other nonprofit cultural organizations across that state that are taking this stand. As executive director Olga Viso wrote back […]

Walker staff and friends pose for a “Vote No” family photo on Election Day. Photo: Gene Pittman

The Walker has been vocal about its opposition to a constitutional amendment on the Minnesota ballot today that would restrict the definition of marriage as between a man and a woman. We join more than 120 other nonprofit cultural organizations across that state that are taking this stand. As executive director Olga Viso wrote back in May:

“We affirm that love is love, and that the Minnesota Constitution—a document created to define rights instead of impose restrictions—should not be amended to make value judgments about love… But beyond that, we realize that creative communities like ours thrive when we can all be ourselves. The immensely talented people we work with include many who are gay and lesbian, and we support them and see them as friends and equals. We also recognize that the healthiest creative climates are open to all. To foster creativity, to attract artists and audiences, and to grow the state’s economy during difficult times, we believe we must be welcoming to all, regardless of the gender of their loved ones.”

This morning, we visually reiterated these values. We turned over the lawn beside our building to 100 or more “Vote No” signs–provided by staff, friends, neighbors, and the Minnesotans United for All Families campaign–to give those who pass through our busy intersection a bold reminder of where we stand (and a colorful reminder to get out and vote). Then we invited staff and members of the community–not to mention a wandering Gandalf carrying a “You Shall Not Pass” marriage amendment sign–to join us for a “Vote No” family photo. Despite blustery weather, several dozen people showed up from all Walker departments, the neighborhood, and beyond.

Update 11.07.12: We’re pleased to report that the marriage amendment–along with the voter ID amendment–were defeated by Minnesota voters Tuesday.

Update 06.26.15: In a 5-to-4 vote, the Supreme Court of the United States has ruled that the Constitution guarantees a nationwide right to same-sex marriage.

Nate Solas, the Walker’s head technologist, came in on his day off to share Minnesota-shaped “Vote No” cookies he and his daughter Isla made:

Digital marketing associate Kristina Fong and artist  Sam Gould of Red76 give the constitutional amendment the thumbs down:

Walker performing arts intern Anat Shinar, with husband Sam Baker and daughter Miri, braved the winds…

…and later posed with Sheila Smith (at left below) of Minnesota Citizens for the Arts:

Following our photo shoot, “Gandalf”–aka Adam Sharp–continued canvassing Hennepin Avenue for at least two hours:

Walker director Olga Viso, who wrote that the Walker believes the amendment is “an unnecessary measure, but also one that would make our state a less welcoming place.”

We’d like to thank all those who came by for the photo, all those who dropped off signs in our front yard, and–most importantly–all those who vote against this constitutional amendment.

More photos from the morning:

The Walker’s Kathleen McLean, Nate and Isla Solas, Greg Beckel, Anat Shinar and Miri

Mike Jones of Gather by D’amico

All photos by Paul Schmelzer unless otherwise noted.

 

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