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Eavesdrop 06.16.08

Former Walker director (and now director emeritus) Martin Friedman and his wife, Mickey, were at a reception in their honor Friday afternoon at the Gallery 8 Cafe. Just before the mass of staff poured in for free wine and crackers, Martin Friedman discussed his interactions 20 years ago with artists placing their works in the […]

Former Walker director (and now director emeritus) Martin Friedman and his wife, Mickey, were at a reception in their honor Friday afternoon at the Gallery 8 Cafe. Just before the mass of staff poured in for free wine and crackers, Martin Friedman discussed his interactions 20 years ago with artists placing their works in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Friedman also talks here with Deborah Butterfield, who was also at the reception, about her work in the garden, Woodrow (1988).

Curating beyond our walls

Walker assistant curator Yasmil Raymond juried Open Door 4, the the fourth annual juried exhibition at Rosalux Gallery, an artist-run co-op, at Open Book in Minneapolis. Raymond sifted through more than 200 entries to select 15 artists for this show: Matt Bakkom, Greg Carideo, Sarah Christianson, Jennifer Danos, Jan Estep, Gregory Euclide, Mark Fisher, Luisa […]

Walker assistant curator Yasmil Raymond juried Open Door 4, the the fourth annual juried exhibition at Rosalux Gallery, an artist-run co-op, at Open Book in Minneapolis.

Raymond sifted through more than 200 entries to select 15 artists for this show: Matt Bakkom, Greg Carideo, Sarah Christianson, Jennifer Danos, Jan Estep, Gregory Euclide, Mark Fisher, Luisa F. Garcia Gomez, Caroline Kent, Janet Lobberecht, Jennifer Nevitt, Tim Roby, Chad Rutter, Tony Sunder and Aaron Van Dyke. Bakkom recently mentored teens from the Walker’s Teen Arts Council on their Collections Project.

Opening reception for Open Door 4 is 7-10 pm Saturday. The exhibition is up through June 29.

National Conference for Media Reform 2008

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMj2eJQBuUI[/youtube] part 1 [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XtAb55za7A[/youtube] part 2 I spent last weekend at the National Conference for Media Reform, at the Minneapolis Convention Center, where about 3,500 media activists, educators and entrepreneurs discussed policy, journalism, trends, and outlooks. Among them were several heroes of the reform movement — Bill Moyers, Amy Goodman, Arianna Huffington, Bob McChesney, more. […]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMj2eJQBuUI[/youtube]

part 1

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XtAb55za7A[/youtube]

part 2

I spent last weekend at the National Conference for Media Reform, at the Minneapolis Convention Center, where about 3,500 media activists, educators and entrepreneurs discussed policy, journalism, trends, and outlooks. Among them were several heroes of the reform movement — Bill Moyers, Amy Goodman, Arianna Huffington, Bob McChesney, more. They all appear in my two-part video report — my personal highlight is Dan Rather’s answer to my question at a press conference he gave Saturday.

What, you might ask, is the relevance to this blog? Your ability to access this (or any) blog depends, in large part, on the gatekeepers of the Internet. “Net neutrality” is the oh-so-sexy term for the guiding principle that preserves a free and open Internet. Here’s a little more detail from savetheinternet.org:

Put simply, Net Neutrality means no discrimination. Net Neutrality prevents Internet providers from speeding up or slowing down Web content based on its source, ownership or destination. Net Neutrality is the reason why the Internet has driven economic innovation, democratic participation, and free speech online. It protects the consumer’s right to use any equipment, content, application or service on a non-discriminatory basis without interference from the network provider. With Net Neutrality, the network’s only job is to move data — not choose which data to privilege with higher quality service.

The cause also dovetails into the Walker’s involvement with The UnConvention, a “non-partisan collective of citizens who have come together to create a forum in which to promote the democratic and free exchange of ideas on important issues.”

Philadelphia Museum chief executive dies

Anne d’Harnoncourt, chief executive of the Philadelphia Museum, died this morning unexpectedly. The New York Times called d’Harnoncourt “one of the art world’s most influential women.” She was 64. D’Harnoncourt had risen from the museum’s curatorial ranks to become, in 1996, its chief executive. Lee Rosenbaum, who pens the CultureGrrl blog for Arts Journal, called […]

Anne d’Harnoncourt, chief executive of the Philadelphia Museum, died this morning unexpectedly. The New York Times called d’Harnoncourt “one of the art world’s most influential women.” She was 64.

D’Harnoncourt had risen from the museum’s curatorial ranks to become, in 1996, its chief executive. Lee Rosenbaum, who pens the CultureGrrl blog for Arts Journal, called d’Harnoncourt “a woman of grace, great distinction, contagious enthusiasm and, above all, warmth. A tremendous loss to the city to which she was a heroine, and to the art world for which she was a role model.”

The Philadelphia Museum’s relationship with the Walker manifested most recently in the Frida Kahlo exhibition, which just left Philadelphia on its way to San Francisco.

Don’t let anyone see your armpits

MinnPost has an interesting piece today from Ron Way, who mixes an assessment of Walker on the Green with a short history lesson on miniature golf. Among other “hmm … you don’t say?” nuggets, Way drops this factoid: (The) first miniature golf course was the Ladies’ Putting Club in St. Andrews, Scotland, formed in 1867. […]

MinnPost has an interesting piece today from Ron Way, who mixes an assessment of Walker on the Green with a short history lesson on miniature golf. Among other “hmm … you don’t say?” nuggets, Way drops this factoid:

(The) first miniature golf course was the Ladies’ Putting Club in St. Andrews, Scotland, formed in 1867. Back then, it was taboo for women to swing a golf club more than shoulder high.

Some taboos are more meritorious than others. At least the Walker doesn’t discriminate with its taboos — anyone playing Walker on the Green will get a finger-wagging for swinging a club more than shoulder high.

eavesdrop 05.27.08

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=qPce12kb0Fk[/youtube] Swing into the opening party for Walker on the Green: Artist-Designed Mini Golf. The course is open through Labor Day.

Talk with Vergne June 12, Vote Yes November 4

Walker Deputy Director and Chief Curator Philippe Vergne is lending his perspective and voice to a June 12 panel discussion on the current and future states of the arts in Minnesota. Free to the public, the discussion is 5:30 pm at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Joining Vergne at a long table are Kaywin Feldman […]

Walker Deputy Director and Chief Curator Philippe Vergne is lending his perspective and voice to a June 12 panel discussion on the current and future states of the arts in Minnesota. Free to the public, the discussion is 5:30 pm at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Joining Vergne at a long table are Kaywin Feldman (executive director, Minneapolis Institute of Arts), Jocelyn Hale (executive director, Loft Literary Center), Lily Schwartz (director of Pops and Special Projects, Minnesota Orchestra), John Miller-Stephany (associate artistic director, Guthrie Theater), and Vickie Benson (McKnight Foundation program director for the arts). Moderating is FOX9 news anchor Robyne Robinson.

Expect some back-and-forth (mostly forth) about the “Vote Yes” ballot initiative — more formally known as the Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment. The Walker is among many arts (i.e. cultural legacy) institutions advocating the measure, which calls for amending the Minnesota state constitution to add and dedicate three-eighths of a cent on every dollar of taxable sales (think three extra pennies for every $10 you spend at retail) to environmental, outdoors, sporting and arts organizations.

If recent history is an indication, those extra pennies would add up to about $300 million each year (19.25 percent of that will go toward arts/culture). State and regional arts councils would administer the arts funding, redistributing it through existing grant programs. The rest goes to protect, enhance, and/or restore Minnesota’s drinking water sources, wetlands, prairies, forests, lakes, rivers, steams, and groundwater, wildlife habitat, and parks and trails.

On the surface, the arts might seem the round peg on the square board. After all, where else would you find painters and hunters in the grip of solidarity? But proponents are wrapping all the interests into one pitch slogan: “Protect the Minnesota you love.” And who can argue with clean water?

The Walker is asking you to join Vergne in November by saying Vote Oui.

The Mr. Rogers of Contemporary Art

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=Si7DxOu31V0[/youtube] part one [youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=aS7U2y8fDrY&feature=related[/youtube] part two I found an odd little series on YouTube called Each & Every One of You, which the creators describe as “a sincere but irreverent 1980s cable TV-style show” that “teaches ordinary people how to make contemporary installation art.” The host, Don Goodes — a former art critic and self-styled […]

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=Si7DxOu31V0[/youtube]

part one

[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=aS7U2y8fDrY&feature=related[/youtube]

part two

I found an odd little series on YouTube called Each & Every One of You, which the creators describe as “a sincere but irreverent 1980s cable TV-style show” that “teaches ordinary people how to make contemporary installation art.” The host, Don Goodes — a former art critic and self-styled Mr. Rogers living in Montreal — dedicates this two-part episode (warning: total running time is about 30 minutes) to what he calls Political Accumulation Installation.

“We begin by taking a stand — the stand of criticizing Western culture for its misdoings,” Goodes says, before leading viewers through the other three essential steps to contemporary installation art: Making aesthetic decisions, developing the concept and, ultimately, making the work. My favorite segment, in Part 2, is dedicated to “rejected artists,” featuring interviews with artists “whose projects were rejected by art galleries, art councils or whatever.”

eavesdrop 05.07.08

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aIa3JyddbQ[/youtube] Performances of Trisha Brown’s Planes happen on the half-hour between 11 am to 2 pm Saturday and 6 to 9 pm Thursday, in the Walker’s Medtronic Gallery, through the run of the exhibition of Brown’s drawings, So That the Audience Does Not Know Whether I Have Stopped Dancing. Here, three dancers perform at May’s […]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_aIa3JyddbQ[/youtube]

Performances of Trisha Brown’s Planes happen on the half-hour between 11 am to 2 pm Saturday and 6 to 9 pm Thursday, in the Walker’s Medtronic Gallery, through the run of the exhibition of Brown’s drawings, So That the Audience Does Not Know Whether I Have Stopped Dancing. Here, three dancers perform at May’s Free First Saturday (about a dozen are on rotation in this trio) and, afterward, discuss the work.

And the Webby goes to …

The Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, at the Smithsonian, is among winners of the 12th annual Webby Awards — the Internet’s version of the Oscars — as Best Cultural Institution for its Web site for Design for the Other 90%. The exhibition opens May 24 in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. As it happens, Smithsonian Education was […]

The Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, at the Smithsonian, is among winners of the 12th annual Webby Awards — the Internet’s version of the Oscars — as Best Cultural Institution for its Web site for Design for the Other 90%. The exhibition opens May 24 in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. As it happens, Smithsonian Education was nominated in the same category, earning the People’s Choice award there. The National Gallery of Art earned nominations in two categories (Art and Podcasts).

The Museum of Modern Art won a Webby in the Art category for its illuminating site detailing Richard Serra’s 2007 retrospective. Throughout, you’ll find captivating video, vivid photography and revealing interviews with Serra, who opens his intensive process and gives a detailed tour of his work on video.

No other American arts institution earned a nomination in the Art and Best Cultural Institution categories.

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