Blogs Centerpoints Elisabeth Hawthorne

Elisabeth Hawthorne is the Digital Content Intern at the Walker Art Center. After receiving her B.A. in History of Art from Haverford College in 2016, Elisabeth returned to Minnesota, eager to dive into the arts and culture of the Twin Cities once again. She is currently a gallery assistant at the Soap Factory in Minneapolis.

Around Town: Sculpture Garden on Loan

The Walker and Minneapolis Sculpture campus renovation will be completed with the reopening of the Garden on June 3, 2017, created an integrated 19-acre campus. Numerous changes—the addition of 18 new artworks and more than 300 new trees, eco-friendly landscape features, and a water reuse system—will improve the Garden’s aesthetics, accessibility, and long-term stability. As spring haltingly […]

Brower Hatcher, Prophecy of the Ancients, 1989, on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016.

Brower Hatcher, Prophecy of the Ancients (1989), on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016

The Walker and Minneapolis Sculpture campus renovation will be completed with the reopening of the Garden on June 3, 2017, created an integrated 19-acre campus. Numerous changes—the addition of 18 new artworks and more than 300 new trees, eco-friendly landscape features, and a water reuse system—will improve the Garden’s aesthetics, accessibility, and long-term stability. As spring haltingly arrives in Minneapolis, installation of returning works, as well as those newly commissioned or acquired, continues apace. While we look forward to welcoming more than 30 artworks back to the Garden, there will be some familiar faces missing.

Mark di Suvero, Molecule, 1991, on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016.

Mark di Suvero, Molecule (1991), on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016

Nearly all the previous Minneapolis Sculpture Garden artworks were placed in storage during construction. Leveraging innovative partnerships across Minneapolis with the Gold Medal Park Conservancy Fund, the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia), and the Weisman Art Museum, the Walker relocated several of the most beloved sculptures through long-term loans, allowing the works to remain accessible to the public. The loans are renewable each year and partnering organizations have agreed to the arrangement for up to five years, after which time the loans will be reevaluated.

Tony Cragg, Ordovician, 1989, on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016.

Tony Cragg, Ordovician Pore (1989), on loan to the City of Minneapolis and Gold Medal Park. Photo: George Heinrich, October 2016

Brower Hatcher’s Prophecy of the Ancients (1988), Mark di Suvero’s Molecule (1977–1983), and Tony Cragg’s Ordovician Pore (1989) were loaned to Gold Medal Park, which sits adjacent to the Guthrie Theater, the Walker’s former neighbor, along the Mississippi Riverfront.Jacques Lipchitz’s Prometheus Strangling the Vulture II (1944/1953) was loaned to the Minneapolis Institute of Art, aligning with the institution’s robust bronze collection. Frank Gehry’s Standing Glass Fish (1986) is on loan to the Weisman Art Museum, housed in the iconic Gehry–designed building on the University of Minnesota’s Twin Cities campus.

Frank Gehry, Standing Glass Fish, 1986, installed in the Weisman Museum at the University of Minnesota. Photo: Rik Sferra, February 15, 2016.

Frank Gehry, Standing Glass Fish (1986), installed in the Weisman Museum at the University of Minnesota. Photo: Rik Sferra, February 15, 2016

Tour the New Walker Entrance

The new entrance to the Walker has been open for over a month now, and it’s already seen a lot: the Avant Garden gala, Avant Museology symposium, and an Open House weekend that welcomed nearly 10,000 visitors over four event-packed days. How has it been received? Extremely well, if the review by architecture critic and […]

bg2016VinelandEnt1117 Building and Grounds, Vineland entrance, Liz Larner sculpture, " X ", Accession number 2015.27, vestibule, signage, Garden Overlook.
The new entrance to the Walker has been open for over a month now, and it’s already seen a lot: the Avant Garden gala, Avant Museology symposium, and an Open House weekend that welcomed nearly 10,000 visitors over four event-packed days.

How has it been received? Extremely well, if the review by architecture critic and professor Thomas Fisher—who called the entrance “one of the more impressive new buildings in Minneapolis”—is any indication. Designed by Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA Architects, the new addition was made a reality by builder M.A. Mortenson Co. and the long-term effort of Walker staff. With work completed and the building reoriented to its entrance on Vineland Place, the public is beginning to reap the benefits of this carefully designed space. For those who have been unable to visit in person since the space opened, here’s a virtual tour of what you can expect on your next visit. The Walker is proud to give its new entrance—a beautiful and functional space that facilitates community gathering—to the public’s trust.bg2016VinelandEnt1117 Building and Grounds, Vineland entrance, Liz Larner sculpture, " X ", Accession number 2015.27, vestibule, signage, Garden Overlook.

As a visitor approaching the Walker from Vineland Place or the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, the low-profile addition to the 1971 Barnes tower provides a readily identifiable entrance to the art center. From the exterior it appears—due to window and wall placement—that there are three distinct modular spaces: from left to right the lobby, vestibule, and restaurant Esker Grove.

Through floor-to-ceiling glass, figures are cast in silhouette against the backdrop of Frank Big Bear’s expansive collage, Multiverse #10. Liz Larner’s X provides a focal point outside the museum.

bg2016VinelandEnt1117 Building and Grounds, Vineland entrance, Liz Larner sculpture, " X ", Accession number 2015.27, vestibule, signage, Garden Overlook.

A border of sheet glass sets the vestibule apart from its surrounding structure, framing it within the building’s lines and emphasizing its tunnel-like character. Walking through the vestibule is an experience of transportation and transformation—“like a walk-in Donald Judd sculpture,” as the University of Minnesota’s Fisher put it. It’s slick. Dimensions extend in the high-gloss reflection, light is infused yellow, and even the quality of sound changes as feet cross the metal grilles.

bg2016LobbyDesk1117 Building and Grounds, Main Lobby Desk, November 17, 2016.

Enter the main lobby: a spacious, multi-purpose area that is easily navigable thanks to common sense and signage. Turn to your left and you are greeted by the front desk, helpful visitor service representatives, and screens cycling through pertinent information and Walker programming. Lockers, restrooms, and the Art Lab are down the stairs behind the desk, as are Elevator 1 and the stairs leading to Galleries 1 through 7.Building and Grounds, Main Bazinet Lobby, November 17, 2016. Seating, furnishings, Video Wall, glass window wall onto Vineland.

To the left of visitor services is the front lobby, a high, light-filled hall with entrance to the Walker Cinema. This is a room to take your time in, to sit and prepare for or process your visit to the galleries.

Building and Grounds, Main Bazinet Lobby, November 17, 2016. Seating, furnishings, Video Wall, glass window wall onto Vineland.

Make use of the comfortable couches and convenient personal laptop tables to get some work done, or watch the 7-by-11-foot video screen to soak in information, art, and ideas from current and past Walker exhibitions.

bg2016wacpac1117 Building and Grounds, Education, Public Programs, WACPAC, Bazinet Main Lobby, seating, kids, November 17, 2016.

To answer the inevitable question about the pebble-shaped objects: yes, the “poufs” are remarkably fun and comfortable to sit on or lean against. Pause and appreciate the view of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden through the windows. Share thoughts and converse with family and friends.

bg2016LittleShop1117 Building and Grounds, Little Shop, November 17, 2016.

To the right of visitor services the Walker (Little) Shop offers souvenirs, Walker merchandise, and gift items perfect for the holidays. With rotating stock and displays, the (Little) Shop changes according to the seasons and Walker programs, offering a uniquely themed retail experience.

bg2016Wayfinding1117 Building and Grounds, wayfinding, signage, Little Shop, parking garage corridor, November 17, 2016.

Beside the (Little) Shop are the stairs leading to Galleries A through D and the Herzog & de Meuron–designed building. Find your way by consulting new signage on walls and pillars in the lobby.

bg2016tps1115 Building & Grounds, interiors, Target Project Space, November 15, 2016. Frank Big Bear installation featured.

The newly opened restaurant Esker Grove is located to the right upon entering from Vineland Place. Glass creates a transparent divide between restaurant and lobby while warm wood welcomes visitors in for a coffee, cocktail, or meal by executive chef Doug Flicker. The Target Project Space—a space for yearlong, large-scale art commissions—launches with Big Bear’s Multiverse 432-panel work, an endlessly detailed collage that draws museum and restaurant visitors alike into conversation.

bg2016P1c1115 Building and Grounds, interiors, P1 Corridor. New entryway from Parking Garage into Bazinet Main Lobby on the P1 level. Featuring backlit displays. November 15, 2016

A hallway connects the lobby and parking garage, featuring backlit images of Walker present and past. It’s a straight shot along this hallway to the new entrance, which frames the iconic Spoonbridge and Cherry in the distance. The renovated addition affirms the strong connection between the Sculpture Garden and Walker.

To learn more, take in “Making an Entrance,” the December 19, 2016, conversation between designers Cook and Soranno:

Our Picks for Give to the Max Day 2016

Today is Give to the Max Day, a 24-hour event sponsored by GiveMN.org in support of Minnesota’s schools and nonprofits. More than a day of marathon donating, Give to the Max provides individuals with an opportunity to appreciate the generous, vital philanthropic community in the Twin Cities. In that spirit, Walker staff members have shared some […]

Today is Give to the Max Day, a 24-hour event sponsored by GiveMN.org in support of Minnesota’s schools and nonprofits. More than a day of marathon donating, Give to the Max provides individuals with an opportunity to appreciate the generous, vital philanthropic community in the Twin Cities. In that spirit, Walker staff members have shared some of their favorite nonprofit organizations that support the arts in Minnesota. The Walker Art Center is proud to work with many of the remarkable nonprofits that invigorate the local arts community. Check out our picks for Give to the Max Day 2016 and happy donating!

Cedar Cultural Center

The Cedar Cultural Center

Established  in 1989 in Minneapolis’s Cedar-Riverside neighborhood, this nonprofit venue hosts a wide variety of global music and dance performances—in addition to supporting artist residencies, screening films, and presenting comedy, spoken word, and community events. A longtime partner with the Walker, we’ll be co-presenting several concerts with the Cedar this spring, including Mbongwana Star on March 3 and Kneedelus, a live collaboration between Kneebody and Daedelus, on March 24.

GIVE 

Suggested by Molly Hanse, Performing Arts

DanceMN

DanceMN

DanceMN is an artist-driven resource designed to connect, educate, and publicize dance services and information in the Twin Cities and statewide. Presented by Springboard for the Arts, DanceMN supports local dance artists by sharing news of upcoming performances, workshops, master classes, and auditions.

GIVE 

Suggested by Anat Shinar, Performing Arts

 IFP MN

Independent Filmmaker Project

The Independent Filmmaker Project promotes a vibrant and diverse community of independent film and media artists through networking, educational programs, and providing funding and screening opportunities. With the end goal of creating a healthy and viable filmmaking community in Minnesota, IFP sponsors screenings, workshops, and fellowships. Beginning in January, IFP Minnesota in coordination with the Walker will be presenting and the Walker Art Center screenings of Independent Spirit Awards–nominated films.

GIVE 

Suggested by Emily Gastineau, Education and Public Programs

 

Interact Center

Interact Center

Founded in 1996, the Interact Center is dedicated to providing studio and performing arts opportunities for artists with disabilities ages 18 and up, supporting them as they pursue a creative career. The Center’s radical inclusion of these disabled artists encourages them to challenge perceptions of disability through art, enriching the Twin Cities artistic offerings by sharing their diverse experiences. This November will see Interact’s theatrical ensemble production of the play What Fools These Mortals Be, as well as the organization’s 20th-anniversary celebration.

GIVE 

Suggested by Julia Anderson, Education and Public Programs

 

Ka Joog

Ka Joog

Ka Joog aims to motivate Somali youth to achieve higher levels of education and civic engagement by offering community-based, culturally specific programs and services to them and their families. Their FANKA arts program hosts workshops in music, storytelling, painting, and sculpture, encouraging youth to dive into Somali artistic traditions and to empower one another through art.  2016 projects include the production of a touring play, Chronicles of the Diaspora, and a documentary in partnership with local PBS station TPT and the Somali Museum titled Somalia: A Nation of Poets.

GIVE 

Suggested by Maya Weisinger, Education and Public Programs

 

kkc2

Kulture Klub Collaborative

The Kulture Klub Collaborative provides enriching multidisciplinary opportunities in the arts for youth experiencing homelessness. KKC brings together homeless youth and local artist to work on transforming the community through workshops, open mics, artist residencies, and art outings. Allowing artists to grow and enact change, the KKC brings dignity and respect to homeless youth. All donations that Kulture Klub receives from this year’s Give to the Max will be going directly to enact strategies for minimizing barriers to youth participation in the arts, funding transportation, food, and child care assistance.

GIVE 

Suggested by Ashley Duffalo, Design/Editorial

 

NAZ

Northside Achievement Zone

Northside Achievement Zone operates as both an organization and a collaborative of more than 40 service providers and schools, supported through a public-private partnership. With the mission of eradicating educational and social disparities in the North Minneapolis community, NAZ focuses on closing the academic achievement gap for low-income children of color and preparing those students and families for college. Early childhood education, K–12, and after-school and summer programming set students on the track to college while enriching their experience with the arts.

GIVE (Direct donations here.)

Suggested by Maya Weisinger, Education and Public Programs

 Soap Factory

The Soap Factory

Housed in the historic National Purity Soap Company building, the Soap Factory is a contemporary art gallery that serves as a laboratory for artistic experimentation and innovation. The Soap is dedicated to supporting artists and engaging audiences in discussion by provide funding, development and exhibition space for new work. On view through December 18 are the 2016 submissions show Working Forces and the single-artist exhibition Mathew Zefeldt: Desktop.

GIVE 

Suggested by Emily Gastineau, Education and Public Programs

Two Rivers Gallery

Two Rivers Gallery

Two Rivers Gallery serves as the arts and cultural resource department of the Minneapolis American Indian Center, which was one of the first urban American Indian centers in the country to provide educational and social services when established in 1974. Seeking to preserve and support American Indian cultural traditions, MAIC organizes youth and intergenerational programs in the arts and presents the work of Native artists in the Two Rivers Gallery. On view through November 25 is the exhibition Dakota Isanti: Reclaiming Identity.

GIVE 

Suggested by Molly Hanse, Performing Arts

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