List Grid

Blogs Centerpoints

Campus Renovation Update: Inside, Outside, Across the Street

Both inside the Walker and across the street in the garden, big changes are evident as great progress is being made in unifying the 19-acre Walker and Minneapolis Sculpture Garden campus. Here’s a glimpse at what’s been happening behind the construction fencing. Stepping Up: The Walker’s new restaurant, opening in December, has a name and an executive chef. Esker […]

The full view of the 19-acre Walker campus undergoing renovation, July 28, 2016. Click to enlarge. Photo: Gene Pittman

A panoramic view of the full Walker campus undergoing renovation, July 28, 2016. Click to enlarge. Photo: Gene Pittman

Both inside the Walker and across the street in the garden, big changes are evident as great progress is being made in unifying the 19-acre Walker and Minneapolis Sculpture Garden campus. Here’s a glimpse at what’s been happening behind the construction fencing.

Outdoor steps lead to a green roof, punctured by skylights, that will stream sunlight into the new restaurant below. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

Outdoor steps lead to a green roof, perforated by skylights that will stream sunlight into the new restaurant below, August 9, 2016. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

Stepping Up: The Walker’s new restaurant, opening in December, has a name and an executive chef. Esker Grove, which takes its name from two geological features of the restaurant’s setting—the earthen ridge and tree clusters situation just outside its windows—will be headed by executive chef Doug Flicker, of Sandcastle and Piccolo. The restaurant’s interior is taking shape, with key features already in place including two skylights, the restaurant bar, and wall-to-wall windows facing the Garden. Outside a stairway has been installed that takes visitors from the Center’s new front door to the restaurant’s green roof, connecting with a series of ADA-accessible pathways that wind up the hillside. Meanwhile, on the Hennepin side of the building, granite steps have been removed and earth is being contoured in preparation for new plantings that’ll provide much-needed greening to a busy roadway.

Beyond a north-facing glass wall, the Walker's new restaurant takes shape: a skylight (upper left) and bar shelving are soon to be installed. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

Beyond a north-facing glass wall, the Walker’s new restaurant takes form: a skylight (upper left) and bar shelving are soon to be installed. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

Site-Specific Art: Great strides are being made on new artworks commissioned for the garden, and last month saw several artists visit Minneapolis to view the final destination for their in-progress works. One, Berlin-based artist Nairy Baghramian, checked out James Turrell’s Sky Pesher, 2005 (2005), which will ultimately be a neighbor to her trio of new sculptures. Continuing her Continuing her “Privileged Points” series (2011–), the large-scale works will convey a fictitious lightness even as they are rendered in either aluminum or bronze. 

Nairy Baghramian and Fionn Meade survey the upper garden. Photo: TBD

Nairy Baghramian and Fionn Meade survey the upper garden. Photo: Misa Jeffereis

Also making site visits during the month were French artist Philippe Parreno, who’s creating an installation with both indoor and outdoor components, and Twin Cities–based artist Kinji Akagawa, whose Garden Seating, Reading, Thinking, a bench commissioned to open the original garden in 1988, will be reinstalled. Additionally, our curatorial team traveled to Chicago to meet with Theaster Gates, whose commission will take the form of a “secular-sacred sanctuary.” 

Then and Now: Thanks to the Walker Archives, we can compare the way the Garden looked the year before its grand opening with today’s project, about a year before reopening—both shot from the Walker terraces. (The 1987 view features a baseball field on the north end of the garden; that 3.5-acre parcel became part of the Garden in a 1992 expansion.)

Then: then in progress, the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden takes shape, 1987. Photo: Walker Art Center Archives

The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden in the making, 1987. Photo: Walker Art Center Archives

The Minneapolis Sculpture Garden renovation as of August 9, 2016. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

Lilypads Emerge: At the north end of the Garden, three “lilypads”—as we’ve been calling three new circular earthen sculpture pads—are starting to emerge from the earth. Just north of Spoonbridge and Cherry, they’ll eventually showcase Katharina Fritsch’s giant blue rooster, Hahn/Cock (2015), Mark di Suvero’s sculpture/swing Arikidea (1977–1982), and Theaster Gates’s commissioned installation.

The three "lilypads" will be home to Photo: Paul Schmelzer

As seen from the Irene Hixon Whitney Bridge, three “lilypads” will be home to, clockwise from left, works by Theaster Gates, Mark di Suvero, and Katharina Fritsch. Photo: Paul Schmelzer

The full campus schematic, with "lilypads" at left. Image: © HGA Minneapolis and oslund.and.assoc.

The full campus schematic, with “lilypads” at left. Image: © HGA Minneapolis and oslund.and.assoc.

New Coats: In preparation for their reappearance in the renovated garden next year two familiar works have gotten a makeover. Tony Smith’s Amaryllis (1965/68) has been primed and painted its signature black, while Franz West’s Sitzwuste (2000) bench sculptures have been repainted (again). Read more about the particular challenges of conserving outdoor sculpture.

Bright and new, Sitzwuste repainted. Photo: Joe King

Bright and new, Sitzwuste repainted. Photo: Joe King

Franz West's Sitzwuste, primed and ready for a coat of color paint. Photo: Joe King

Franz West’s Sitzwuste, primed and ready for a coat of color paint. Photo: Joe King

IMG_1927

Tony Smith’s Amaryllis after a coat of primer. Photo: Joe King

Check back next month for a new update, or read our July 1 dispatch.

No posts