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Centerpoints: Serra’s Labor, Favela Typography, Dalí Pops

• In addition to being surrealism’s mustachioed poster child, Salvador Dalí had his side gigs doing commercial work—like the iconic daisy logo for Chupa Chups, the popular Spanish lollipops, he made in 1969. • For the Brooklyn Museum’s Keith Haring show, opening Mar. 16, the late artist’s foundation has been scanning pages from his journal. […]


• In addition to being surrealism’s mustachioed poster child, Salvador Dalí had his side gigs doing commercial work—like the iconic daisy logo for Chupa Chups, the popular Spanish lollipops, he made in 1969.

• For the Brooklyn Museum’s Keith Haring show, opening Mar. 16, the late artist’s foundation has been scanning pages from his journal. Today we see the page from Haring’s birthday in ‘77, when he met a former Minnesota Viking.

• Spanish collective Boa Mistura recently led a “typographic intervention” with residents in the São Paulo favela of Vila Brâsilandia. Playing tricks with perspective, they made words like “sweetness” and “tenacity” appear to float above the winding pathways.

GIFs have come a long way since 1987, when the web-based image format brought us animated flames and “Under Construction” signs. Today, as PBS tracks, they’re the basis of a new kind of art, with Tumblr and Reddit helping to spread GIF-based memes.

• Sculptor Richard Serra developed a “union solidarity” working in a steel mill as a teenager. “That’s never left me, the notion of the effort the working class puts in every day,” he tells Tyler Green. “The split in the country right now is not good for either class.”

Chattanooga, Tennessee, sees itself on the rebound, with a boom in arts and industry. Designers Robbie de Villiers and Jeremy Dooley think they can telegraph these gains with a custom-designed typeface for the city: Chatype.

• An “ebullient, graphic, homoerotic, black-and-white” mural made by Keith Haring in the former mensroom of New York’s Lesbian and Gay Community Services Center in 1989 is open to the public all month long following a $25,000 conservation effort.

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