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Centerpoints: Punk’s Lascaux

Graffiti uncovered on walls in a London flat are works of art meriting the site’s preservation, says a British archaeologist. The apartment was rented in the mid-’70s by members of the Sex Pistols, and many of the images were drawn by John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten. “The tabloid press once claimed that early Beatles recordings discovered at the BBC were the most important archaeological find since Tutankhamun’s tomb,” says John Schofield of the University of York. “The Sex Pistols’ graffiti in Denmark Street surely ranks alongside this and — to our minds — usurps it.”

More art news inside.

• In an early commemoration of its 50th birthday in 2015, Modern Art Oxford (formerly the Museum of Modern Art Oxford) is exhibiting 50 promotional posters from its exhibitions, curated by artists Simon and Tom Bloor. Included are posters for shows by Donald Judd, Joseph Beuys, Yoko Ono, and Alexander Rodchenko. Creative Review notes that the names of designers has been omitted, a problem it’s trying to rectify on its site.

• A plan floated by Minnesota Republicans to dedicate funds from the Legacy Amendment, a voter-approved constitutional measure directing a 3/8-cent sales tax to arts and environmental projects, for a Vikings stadium would hurt small arts groups, according to sources in an MPR story on the plan.

• Punk’s Lascaux: Graffiti uncovered on walls in a London flat are works of art meriting the site’s preservation, says a British archaeologist. The apartment was rented in the mid-’70s by members of the Sex Pistols, and many of the images were drawn by John Lydon, aka Johnny Rotten. “The tabloid press once claimed that early Beatles recordings discovered at the BBC were the most important archaeological find since Tutankhamun’s tomb,” says John Schofield of the University of York. “The Sex Pistols’ graffiti in Denmark Street surely ranks alongside this and — to our minds — usurps it.”

• First China accused artist Ai Weiwei of trafficking in pornography for sharing an artwork in which he and several women were photographed nude. Now Facebook seems to be getting in on the action: When documentary filmmaker Alison Klayman posted Ai’s image, the social networking site automatically removed it. She then altered the photos to cover the figures’ “naughty parts” with the Facebook logo, in hopes of conforming with the site’s community standards. The result: Her personal account was disabled. She writes:

Nudity is not always pornography, and censorship is not only about government. Considering that I complied with Facebook’s “Community Guidelines” as soon as I was warned, I am left guessing about why my personal account was disabled. Could it be that it was an automatic action that is taken whether or not a warning is heeded? Was it retribution for using Facebook’s logo to highlight their censoring of the images?

• Winners of the 2011-12 MCAD-Jerome Foundation Fellowship for Emerging Artists have been announced. Congratulations to Twin Cities artists Richard Barlow (a detail of his silver bromide painting is pictured above), Lauren Herzak-Bauman, Alison Hiltner, and Jehra Patrick (who works here at the Walker) and Gregory Euclide, of Le Sueur, Minn.

• It’s Thanksgiving week. You have much to be grateful for, Minnesota artists!