Blogs Centerpoints

Centerpoints 09.13.11

• For his Tumblr blog 3rd of May, which pairs a news headline with a work of art, Modern Art Notes‘ Tyler Green asked what work from the Walker collection would best respond to today’s New York Times story about the spike in bullying and suicides among gay and lesbian students in Minnesota’s largest school […]

Jenny Holzer, YOU CAN WATCH PEOPLE ALIGN THEMSELVES WHEN TROUBLE IS IN THE AIR. SOME PREFER TO BE CLOSE TO THOSE AT THE TOP AND OTHERS WANT TO BE CLOSE TO THOSE AT THE BOTTOM. IT’S A QUESTION OF WHO FRIGHTENS THEM MORE AND WHOM THEY WANT TO BE LIKE. From "The Living Series," 1989.

• For his Tumblr blog 3rd of May, which pairs a news headline with a work of art, Modern Art Notes‘ Tyler Green asked what work from the Walker collection would best respond to today’s New York Times story about the spike in bullying and suicides among gay and lesbian students in Minnesota’s largest school district — and the fight by some district parents to make sure LGBT issues aren’t discussed in district classrooms. Here’s what I came up with.

• Rest in Peace: Richard Hamilton. The famed British artist passed away this week at the age of 89 after a brief illness. Hamilton is perhaps best known for his early collage send-ups of consumerist and political culture, like his 1956 work, Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?, and his 2007 rendering of Tony Blair, Shock and Awe, which featured the then-Prime Minister in a cowboy shirt with holstered pistols. Hamilton has been dubbed the “father of Pop Art,” but quoted by the BBC, he eschewed the term: “While I was interested in the pop phenomenon, I never associated myself with the term, which I used to describe Elvis Presley and rather vulgar American imagery of ice cream cones or hamburgers.”

• As we at the Walker put the finishing touches on a website redesign over our own, New York gallerist/blogger Edward Winkleman looks at recent redesigns at Artnet.com, ArtNews.com and ArtInfo.com.

• In her Design Observer essay, “Thinking in Tumblr,” Alexandra Lange ponders whether she should’ve done her architectural dissertation on the popular, highly visual blogging platform.

• Thinking about the Victoria and Albert Museum’s upcoming exhibition Postmodernism: Style and Subversion 1970–1990, The Guardian‘s Jonathan Jones ponders a question: “Is Close Encounters of the Third Kind the first and greatest work of postmodern art?”

• In a video promoting the Pacific Standard Time festival, a multi-venue celebration of “the birth of the L.A. art scene,” artist Ed Ruscha takes a drive with Anthony Kiedis, the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ frontman and a Ruscha fan. While the conversation-while-driving theme fits Ruscha’s work and the Los Angeles locale, Hyperallergic is unimpressed: “Will this work? Who knows. It is entertaining? Meh. Our ideas to improve this thing? How about hiring a video artist to do something cool?”

• “Shoefiti” — one name for shoes spotted hanging on powerlines — has apparently sparked an artistic movement: Guerrilla Innovation writes about sound artist Reinhard Gupfinger’s “soundfiti” project Sound Tossing, a DIY project that involves wired speakers tossed over electrical lines. The project’s Urban Cricket is a solar-powered audio device that amplifies cricket sounds.

Congratulations, Trisha Brown – 2011 Gish Prize winner

Established in 1994, the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize is given annually to “a man or woman who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life.” Named after the silent film actresses, who left most of their estates to the arts, the $300,000 Gish […]

Brown performing at the Walker in 2008 as part of the exhibition "So That the Audience Does Not Know Whether I Have Stopped Dancing"

Established in 1994, the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize is given annually to “a man or woman who has made an outstanding contribution to the beauty of the world and to mankind’s enjoyment and understanding of life.” Named after the silent film actresses, who left most of their estates to the arts, the $300,000 Gish Prize is one of the largest in the arts and is meant to honor groundbreaking figures in all disciplines.

Receiving it in its 18th year, Brown joins a formidable and eclectic roster of artists — see below — many of whom, like Brown, have had lengthy associations with the Walker. Bill T. Jones, for instance, performed an open rehearsal with his company just last night; and the 10-day festival The Next Stage: Merce Cunningham at the Walker Art Center unfolds starting in late October.

In 2008, the Walker presented an exhibition of Brown’s drawings and other artworks integrating the performing and visual arts, along with several performances of her early work, in Trisha Brown: So That the Audience Does Not Know Whether I Have Stopped Dancing.

Congratulations to Ms. Brown on this latest honor in recognizing her work and its influence. More about the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize here.

Past Recipients of the Dorothy and Lillian Gish Prize
Frank Gehry, architect, 1994
Ingmar Bergman, film director, 1995
Robert Wilson, artist and director, 1996
Bob Dylan, singer/songwriter, 1997
Isabel Allende, author, 1998
Arthur Miller, author and playwright, 1999
Merce Cunningham, dancer and choreographer, 2000
Jennifer Tipton, lighting director, 2001
Lloyd Richards, theater director, 2002
Bill T. Jones, dancer and choreographer, 2003
Ornette Coleman, jazz innovator, 2004
Peter Sellars, theater, opera and festival director, 2005
Shirin Neshat, film maker, 2006
Laurie Anderson, artist, 2007
Robert Redford, actor, 2008
Pete Seeger, singer/songwriter, 2009
Chinua Achebe, author, 2010

 

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