Blogs Centerpoints

Rock the Garden Reviews and Photos: Everybody loves confetti

I’ve been keeping tabs on what people have been saying about this year’s Rock the Garden via Twitter, facebook, and my eyes and ears. There are three things I’m sure of: 1. People love confetti. (And yes, ours was biodegradable.) 2. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings were amazing and stole the show. 3. MGMT was […]

Confetti! Photo: Cameron Wittig

I’ve been keeping tabs on what people have been saying about this year’s Rock the Garden via Twitter, facebook, and my eyes and ears. There are three things I’m sure of:

1. People love confetti. (And yes, ours was biodegradable.)

2. Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings were amazing and stole the show.

3. MGMT was the low after the sugar rush high that was Sharon Jones, but at least they played “Kids.”

I also did a little trend-watching. I counted 500 rompers, 200 straw hats, and 100 bouts of  “grandma’s couch” floral prints. There were only 20 maxi dresses (last year’s romper) so next year, don’t wear a romper. What do you think next year’s big trend will be? Shortalls? Harem pants (will they reach the midwest?) Tie-dye?

Review round-up:

The Onion’s A.V. Club does a quick recap with a short slideshow (including another great confetti shot.)

Twin Cities Daily Planet does a play-by-play of the day with great pictures of the bands and the crowd.

The artcetera blog on Star Tribune offers a quick review of the day, while the full article on the Strib website talks to people from the crowd.

The blog Sandwiches I Have Loved gives a thumbs up to the ratatouille with goat cheese sandwich from Joe’s Garage.

This one on Not Shallow includes a lengthy “romper digression.”

Twin Cities Concert Blog picks the highs and lows of each band. Includes a video of OK Go and their handbell song.

Photo round-up:

I’ve been waiting for this: the City Pages Freestyle Fashion Rock the Garden slideshow!

City Pages‘ well-rounded slideshow of the bands, food vendors, and “10,000 hipsters.”

Star Tribune gallery

50 photos from Twin Cities Metromix (including a strange photo of OK Go’s drummer framed by the lead singer’s outstretched legs)

The Current’s flickr pool (including a photo that captures a pretty fantastic Alan Sparhawk face)

Vita.mn’s photo gallery: lots of band shots.

L’etoile magazine’s photo round-up spends most of the time in the crowd.

Great flickr pool from user choplogicj.

Some nice dusk/city shots from user Dan_H.

Favorite tweet:

MayorRTRybak: Sharon Jones,former prison guard, has Rock the Garden crowd in custody. Love her sound!

More to come as they hit my Google alerts. Also, feel free to let me know if I’ve missed anything.

Be sure to add your best photos to the Rock the Garden photo album on the Rock the Garden facebook page.

Is artistic authenticity blind?

 Two juicy accounts of the closing party for MOMA’s performance-art blockbuster, Marina Abramović: The Artist is Present: Artforum’s Diary covers the whole star-studded, designer-garbed affair, while Jezebel homes in on a remark by the show’s curator that raised the question of just how clearly Abramović could see the more than 1,500 people who came to sit […]

"Marina Abramović: The Artist Is Present: at MoMA - New York. Photo by Marco Anelli. © 2010 Marina Abramović

 Two juicy accounts of the closing party for MOMA’s performance-art blockbuster, Marina Abramović: The Artist is PresentArtforum’s Diary covers the whole star-studded, designer-garbed affair, while Jezebel homes in on a remark by the show’s curator that raised the question of just how clearly Abramović could see the more than 1,500 people who came to sit opposite her in an epic performance piece also titled The Artist is Present. Luckily, the enterprising Jezebel blogger tracked down a friend of Abramović who clarified that the glasses the artist uses are reading glasses. Scandal averted! 

By the way, Marco Anelli‘s collected portraits of the artists’ partners-in-staring constitute a fantastic art project in themselves. MOMA.org presents them as an elegant slideshow; they’re also at the museum’s account on Flickr. Clicking through them on Flickr becomes as another kind of exercise in duration — not just because the collection, like the closing party, is star-studded (will Björk be the next sitter?); you also can’t help noting the minutes that each person held out under the all-consuming and, yes, focused stare of “the grandmother of performance art.”  

Eiko and Koma are two other venerated performers from the same generation as Abramović. Though they consider their work to be dance/theater/visual art rather than performance art, they will be undergoing their own exercise in duration, Naked, in the Walker’s Gallery 2 for the month of November.

Nice Ride MN Kiosk Arrives

The Minneapolis bike share program, Nice Ride Minnesota, will launch Thursday. The Walker just got its bike station a few days ago.  All it needs is bikes! It’s located on Hennepin Avenue, near Groveland Terrace. Maybe you’ve noticed these kiosks popping up around town too. I saw one at Birchwood Cafe in the Seward neighborhood […]

The Minneapolis bike share program, Nice Ride Minnesota, will launch Thursday. The Walker just got its bike station a few days ago.  All it needs is bikes! It’s located on Hennepin Avenue, near Groveland Terrace. Maybe you’ve noticed these kiosks popping up around town too. I saw one at Birchwood Cafe in the Seward neighborhood and another at the Minneapolis College of Art & Design (MCAD).

This bike share program is ideal for short trips. Say, you live in the Seward area and on a gorgeous Saturday morning you decide to enjoy brunch at Birchwood Cafe and then check-out a Nice Ride bike and head over to the Walker to partake in Open Field activities. You check-in the bike at the Walker kiosk and chill on the hill and grab a beer. Then it’s time to meet friends for dinner on Eat Street, so you check-out another bike and ride on over to MCAD. There are so many choices, but you decide on Pancho Villa for its tasty piña coladas (ask for it minus the whipped cream) and nachos.  It’s getting late (you’re no longer a spring chicken…you’re almost 30) so you return to MCAD and check-out your last bike of the day and head on home and drop-off the bike at Birchwood. What a perfect day.

To figure out how to use Nice Ride, visit http://www.niceridemn.org. Subscriptions are super reasonable and once you subscribe, all 30 minute and under rides are free, so bike fast.

Outside notes on coming (& current) attractions

Alec Soth, whose survey From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America opens at the Walker in September, has an exhibition focusing on his portraits at the American Academy in Rome. The New York Times just published a portrait of the utterly charming Eiko and Koma as they prepare for their three-year Retrospective Project, which brings […]

Alec Soth, "Mother and Daughter, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1999"

Alec Soth, whose survey From Here to There: Alec Soth’s America opens at the Walker in September, has an exhibition focusing on his portraits at the American Academy in Rome.

The New York Times just published a portrait of the utterly charming Eiko and Koma as they prepare for their three-year Retrospective Project, which brings them to the Walker this fall. The story’s reference to the “moving-painting” quality of their choreography is apt, since here the duo will perform a dance/visual art installation in Gallery 2 of the ongoing Event Horizon exhibition — for the entire month of November. That piece, Naked, is a new commission; they’ll perform another new work, Raven, a centerpiece of their multiyear retrospective project, at Free First Saturday on October 2.

Co-organized by the Walker, Yves Klein: With the Void, Full Powers opened last week at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., and arrives here in October; the first rave review is in, at the Washington Post.

Modern Art Notes’ Tyler Green greatly admires the Chuck Close: Life, the new biography by Christopher Finch — particularly for the full chapter that Finch devotes to Big Self-Portrait, a key piece in the Walker collection and the first work that Close sold. Check out our related item last fall about Chuck, Christopher, and Linda — wife of Christopher, who sat for Chuck in 1971. Big Self-Portrait is currently a highlight of Benches & Binoculars, on view through November 21.

Finally, take a little photo tour of the art scenes in Berlin and Leipzig or, closer to home, the Pappajohn Sculpture Park in Des Moines, IA, via two recent Walker Patrons’ Circle trips.

Plant as Decorative Element in a Gallery

One aspect of my position as a photographer here at the Walker is to document the exhibitions. This has been an ongoing process dating back to the beginning of the Walker Art Center. While reviewing images of past exhibitions, I began to notice something now absent in the galleries, potted plants.  Up until the opening […]

One aspect of my position as a photographer here at the Walker is to document the exhibitions. This has been an ongoing process dating back to the beginning of the Walker Art Center. While reviewing images of past exhibitions, I began to notice something now absent in the galleries, potted plants.  Up until the opening of the Barnes building in 1971, potted plants were a staple in the galleries.  While there are few exhibition views containing patrons, the plants were always present.  In these images they seem to act as the stand-ins for the patrons, sometimes aloof and in the background or congregating around the radiator as if in discussion.  And then there are those that are really into the work, standing in front of a sculpture’s light, their shadows enveloping the work.

Due to a multitude of reasons, plants only reappear in the galleries if they are part of the artwork.  Many of the plants seem to have been around for many years and well taken care of by the staff.  Enjoy this look at Exhibition Photography and Plants from the Walker archives.

Bits & Pieces: art & inspiration

Inspiration as taste sensation: Many a diner has been delighted by “Spoon, Cube, and Cherry,” the dessert at the Walker’s 20.21 that pays tribute to the Spoonbridge and Cherry centerpiece in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. In similar fashion, San Francisco pastry chef Caitlin Williams Freeman has gone on a bender with the art collection at the San Francisco […]

“Michael Jackson & Bubbles” by Jeff Koons, with “Jeff Koons White-Hot Chocolate” dessert by Caitlin Williams Freeman

Inspiration as taste sensation: Many a diner has been delighted by “Spoon, Cube, and Cherry,” the dessert at the Walker’s 20.21 that pays tribute to the Spoonbridge and Cherry centerpiece in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. In similar fashion, San Francisco pastry chef Caitlin Williams Freeman has gone on a bender with the art collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Along with a Mondrian cake and the slyly named Koons-inspired dessert drink above, she’s concocted “works” for SFMOMA’s coffee bar that include a plate of cookies which, before consuming, you assemble into your own mini Richard Serra sculpture; a fudgsicle shaped like an Ellsworth Kelly sculpture; a Richard Diebenkorn parfait; and more. It’s a treat just to look at the spread on Readymade magazine’s website. Should it get you dreaming of a future career in pastry, browse the ArtsConnectEd website and tell us below which Walker artworks you’d turn into delectable edibles. (Dessert image above by Charlie Villyard.)

What inspires Alec Soth? The photographer, whose first survey opens at the Walker in September, just uploaded the second video for his “Continental Picture Show,” which is part of the New York Times’ Opinionator blog. People are, accordingly, quite opinionated about it. As part of its new MN Original program, Twin Cities Public Television also recently broadcast an interview with and a segment on Soth, which includes Walker curator Siri Engberg.

One city inspires another: Minneapolitans take a lot of ribbing for supposedly being slaves to New York — but today’s Wall Street Journal has a story about how the first-ever New York Gallery Week was inspired by one art dealer’s visit to the “Minneapple” –and The Quick and the Dead exhibition at the Walker:

“The week was conceived by Casey Kaplan—owner of an eponymous art gallery on West 21st Street—after experiencing the buoyant vibe in Minneapolis, where industry types congregated to see the Walker Art Center’s exhibit “The Quick and the Dead” last year.

‘You really felt a community in Minneapolis,’ Mr. Kaplan said. ‘A lot of gallery owners had flown in. There were people from MoMA. Every one was enthusiastic and wanting to be in the moment. It was such a contrast from New York.’ “

So was it just about New Yorkers transplanting themselves, for a moment, into our idyllic Midwestern metropolis, or is something more going on? Read the full story here.

Inspired to show off: On another photographic note: a couple of weeks ago, we invited people to step into David Lamelas’ spotlight, on view in The Talent Show exhibition, for a portrait. Check out all of the results here.

Sculpture Garden bonding request wrap-up: We’ll be back!

You’ve probably heard the latest by now: although the legislature approved $2 million in bonds to help start a restoration of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, Governor Pawlenty line-item vetoed the project from the bill. While the news is obviously very disappointing, we have much to be proud of. This was the first year the Minneapolis […]

You’ve probably heard the latest by now: although the legislature approved $2 million in bonds to help start a restoration of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, Governor Pawlenty line-item vetoed the project from the bill.

While the news is obviously very disappointing, we have much to be proud of. This was the first year the Minneapolis Park & Recreation Board made a request for Sculpture Garden funding. It often takes multiple attempts for a project to simply make it onto the legislative agenda. The Sculpture Garden made it into the bonding bill on the first try, an affirmation of its status as a beloved Minnesota destination.

We also saw an overwhelming show of support for the Sculpture Garden’s proposed preservation. Literally thousands of Minnesotans rose to the occasion to advocate on behalf of the project.

If you were involved in any way—writing to your legislators, sending a letter to the editor, spreading the word about the project—thank you! Your help has been essential in laying a solid groundwork for future collective efforts and eventual success.

What’s up next:

Through a public-awareness campaign, which will begin unfolding over the next couple of months, we expect to grow our network substantially and ultimately secure the funding we need to restore and preserve the Sculpture Garden.

How you can help:

  • Join the Action E-List.This e-mail list is exclusively devoted to information and calls to action regarding the Sculpture Garden project. You’ll likely receive just three or so e-mails per year, and only at critical junctures where action is needed.
  • Become a part of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s Facebook group. Post your favorite pictures, share Garden stories, and keep up on the latest Sculpture Garden news here.
  • Invite your friends to join both of the above.We need a broad representation of folks from around the state who have an affinity for the Sculpture Garden. A successful grassroots effort includes Minnesotans from every legislative district! Use the http://garden.walkerart.org/bonding URL to forward information to your network.

Thanks again for everyone’s efforts to help restore and preserve the Sculpture Garden. We’ll be back! As they say, it’s not over ’til it’s over.

Bits & Pieces: a Tino Sehgal tell-all, “The Subconscious Shelf,” and more

A new kind of art speak: Now that Tino Sehgal’s This Progress exhibition at the Guggenheim is over, its flesh-and-blood artworks are talking, giving the inside scoop on working a Tino Sehgal gig and “the pressure of nonstop thoughtful conversation.” A new kind of literary analysis: The New Yorker’s book bloggers have a nifty new service […]

A new kind of art speak: Now that Tino Sehgal’s This Progress exhibition at the Guggenheim is over, its flesh-and-blood artworks are talking, giving the inside scoop on working a Tino Sehgal gig and “the pressure of nonstop thoughtful conversation.”

A new kind of literary analysis: The New Yorker’s book bloggers have a nifty new service analyzing photos of readers’ bookshelves.

Image submitted to "The Subconscious Shelf"

What does last-minute airfare to Germany cost these days? James Turrell’s Wolfsburg Project, his largest-ever museum installation, closes April 5 at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg. Here’s a video, if you can’t hop the pond. Or come console yourself in Turrell’s Sky Pesher at the Walker

James Turrell, Bridget's Bardo, 2009; © James Turrell, Foto: Florian Holzherr, 2009

A magical encounter with Dolphin Oracle II: read the account from Santa Fe artist and designer Amy Conway.

 

Abstract Expressionist postage stamps: Honor or oxymoron?

  Jonathan Fineburg, a University of Illinois art history professor and the author of Art Since 1940, a text familiar to many college art history students, was selected to choose just 10 artworks for the U.S. Postal Service’s  “Abstract Expressionists” stamps on sale today. He credits – here’s our MN connection – Joan “Joan of Art” […]

 

Untitled work by Mark Rothko, 1953

Jonathan Fineburg, a University of Illinois art history professor and the author of Art Since 1940, a text familiar to many college art history students, was selected to choose just 10 artworks for the U.S. Postal Service’s  “Abstract Expressionists” stamps on sale today. He credits – here’s our MN connection – Joan “Joan of Art” Mondale with influencing the USPS’ decision to create this micro-exhibition. In a process that calls to mind shrinky-dinks, the expansive visions of Joan Mitchell, Willem de Kooning, Arshile Gorky, Robert Motherwell and Hans Hoffman, Adolph Gottlieb, and Barnett Newman, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko (but not the work in the Walker’s collection, picture here) have been distilled to postage-stamp size, presented together on a sheet meant to evoke a gallery installation.

Sneak preview: Spring at Walker Shop

We are just back from the New York International Gift Fair and eager to share some of our favorite finds (and the people who created them). Watch for them their arrival in the Walker Shop this spring! (In the meantime, you can shop our current stock online.)

We are just back from the New York International Gift Fair and eager to share some of our favorite finds (and the people who created them). Watch for them their arrival in the Walker Shop this spring! (In the meantime, you can shop our current stock online.)

Flight 001 travel products – one of our favorite shops in the Village is Flight 001. Now Walker Shop will have these exclusively in Minnesota! ($6 - $46)

“Teabag” porcelain mug (and other pieces) from Bailey Doesn’t Bark. ($38 mug)

Bailey Doesn’t Bark designer Re Jin Lee, or “RJ,” shares her drawings and designs on consciously produced home and life accessories.

Ever Bamboo charcoal purifiers – minimally and beautifully packaged bamboo charcoal deodorizers that are sustainable, reusable, and recyclable - Minnesota exclusive ($9.99 – 14.99)

Shine Labs sonic classic woodblock clock – This wood veneer alarm clock features two internally powered speakers for your connected portable device. LED clock features 6-cycle snooze and night economic power mode. And, by the way, Shine Labs' president Jim Henderson is great-grandson of Walker founder T.B. Walker! ($128)

“Y-Grinder” twin-chamber salt and pepper mill – from Joseph Joseph, with adjustable grind ($48)

“Orb” 3-piece mortar and pestle – from Joseph Joseph, made from non-absorbent vitrified porcelain. Base and lid can be used for crushing and grinding. ($48)

Tea infuser – Stainless steel extra-fine “brew-in-mug” tea infuser with silicone-rimmed lid. Flip the lid and it becomes a holder for infuser. ($19.99)

mt masking tape set – Set of 20 colors of narrow masking tape from Japan. ($40)

Hadas Shaham jewelry – Contemporary jewelry in sterling silver, gold, concrete, and lava, handcrafted by Tel Aviv jewelry artist Hadas Shaham. ($45 - $195)

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