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Centerpoints 10.2

The politics edition: • Presidential art policy: CultureGrrl Lee Rosenbaum dug up Republican presidential candidate John McCain’s art policy, noting that, at just four sentences long, it’d be more accurate to “call that an education policy, not an arts policy.” (Update: LACMA’s new blog Unframed apparently found it first, according to the LA Times’ Christopher […]

The politics edition:

• Presidential art policy: CultureGrrl Lee Rosenbaum dug up Republican presidential candidate John McCain’s art policy, noting that, at just four sentences long, it’d be more accurate to “call that an education policy, not an arts policy.” (Update: LACMA’s new blog Unframed apparently found it first, according to the LA Times’ Christopher Knight). Democrat Barack Obama’s version, which is much more substantial. Noteworthy is his support of the Artist-Museum Partnership Act, which allows “artists to deduct the fair market value of their work, rather than just the costs of the materials, when they make charitable contributions.” Obama’s community blog has much more.

• Cast your vote in the People’s Design Awards: Both Barack Obama and John McCain have campaign logos in the running for the Cooper-Hewitt People’s Design Award, although only Obama’s is among the top vote-getters. Entries, as the name suggests, are submitted and voted on by visitors to the contest website. Vote now through Oct. 23. (Minnesota has two entries.)

• Kruger’s “Brain”: Among her many accolades, artist Barbara Kruger can add another: Last week she won three prizes, including “Cover of the Year” in the Magazine Publishers of America Best Magazine Covers contest for her trademark alteration of a New York cover image of former Gov. Eliot Spitzer. For the top honor, judges wrote:

Artist Barbara Kruger’s graphic interpretation on Henry Leutwyler’s photograph—the word “BRAIN” in a bright-red box with an arrow pointing to the area of Spitzer’s anatomy that seemed to have been thinking for him—was quickly selected, thanks to its directness, humor, and simplicity. The cover required no headlines. The image succeeded powerfully all by itself.

• AIGA GOTV: Last month the AIGA created a series of juried get-out-the-vote posters for distribution and download. Among the 24 posters, which were printed and dropped off for display in storefronts and kiosks, is AIGA Minnesota’s Brad D. Norr. Pictured above: Agustín Garza, AIGA Los Angeles.

• Flagging the arts: This week Tyler Green at Modern Art Notes is asking curators to share their favorite contemporary artwork featuring an American flag. First up, a selection by David S. Rubin, curator of contemporary art at the San Antonio Museum of Art: Sam Wiener‘s Those Who Fail to Remember the Past are Condemned to Repeat It (1970).  He writes:

Created at the time when Minimalism was still in vogue, this sculpture takes the form of a simple cube on its exterior. But looks are deceptive here, as Wiener infused a Minimalist form with significant and timely social commentary. As viewers peer through slats along the sculpture’s upper edges, we see endless rows of flag-draped coffins, an effect created by a mirrored interior.

• “Democracy is merry”: Get your free button this Thursday.

  • Matthew says:

    For those who are interested, the AIGA GOTV posters are on view through Nov 9 at the Minnesota Museum of American Art. http://mmaa.org/Get_Out_The_Vote2.html

  • Matthew says:

    For those who may be interested, the AIGA GOTV posters are on view through Nov 9 at Minnesota Museum of American Art (in St Paul). http://mmaa.org/Get_Out_The_Vote2.html