List Grid

Blogs Centerpoints

Centerpoints 10.1

• Object-based new media: Former Walker visual arts curatorial fellow Sarah Cook is interviewed by Rhizome about Untethered, the show she curated for Eyebeam. “I was tiring of new media exhibitions that rely on video documentation, screens, text, and proof-of-concept, and I wanted to question one of the assumptions that the art world has about […]

• Object-based new media: Former Walker visual arts curatorial fellow Sarah Cook is interviewed by Rhizome about Untethered, the show she curated for Eyebeam. “I was tiring of new media exhibitions that rely on video documentation, screens, text, and proof-of-concept, and I wanted to question one of the assumptions that the art world has about new media, namely that it isn’t an object,” she says. Fittingly then, Untethered, which closes Oct. 25,  is about hacked objects. It’s described as “a sculpture garden of everyday objects deprogrammed of their original function, embedded with new intelligence, and transformed into surrealist and surprising readymades, including a photocopier that reads the night sky; a PDA turned guitar; and a piano that plays the Internet. The exhibition features pieces by 15 artists working at the intersection of art and technology, including current and former Eyebeam residents and fellows, as well as leading international artists.” See exhibition images here, including Michael de Broin’s Dead Star (pictured above, in detail).

• Deerhoof interview: Culture Bully, my go-to source for Deerhoof news, interviews Greg Saunier, drummer for the Bay Area art-rock band, on the new album Offend Maggie, its cover art and his Oct. 14 show at Minneapolis’ First Avenue. Deerhoof also makes today’s Art Fag City post on the top-10 music videos made by contemporary artists for a video by Martha Colburn.

• Found Barney: Culture Pundits directs our attention to CremasterFanatic.com, which catalogues found “field emblems” from Matthew Barney’s film series.

• Lydia Fong speaks: “I needed to become another person — to be in a different persona to make that work,” says Barry McGee in a KQED video interview as Lydia Fong, his artistic alter ego.