Blogs Centerpoints

More on Rirkrit’s Thai pad

Chiang Mai-based architect Aroon Puritat writes in to share more photos of the house he designed for (and with) Rirkrit Tiravanija in the northern Thai provincial capital. And Bangkok-based architect/writer Rachaporn Choochuey offers her perspective on the structure, reminding us of Rirkrit’s work in architecture (including his 1997 installation of a 1:2 scale model of […]

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Chiang Mai-based architect Aroon Puritat writes in to share more photos of the house he designed for (and with) Rirkrit Tiravanija in the northern Thai provincial capital. And Bangkok-based architect/writer Rachaporn Choochuey offers her perspective on the structure, reminding us of Rirkrit’s work in architecture (including his 1997 installation of a 1:2 scale model of Philip Johnson’s Glass House in the courtyard at MoMA). She says Rirkrit’s is “the first real ‘contemporary’ Thai house”:

Rirkrit told us that the idea of the house is to have very simple concrete building, elevated from the ground – the least touch. The exisiting site has a lot of trees, they did not want to cut any of them. So the building is inserted in the site in a zigzaging manner among the trees around. The main space is this big, simple, rough but very strong courtyard of the house where the main activities (the kitchen, the library and the entrance). The veranda running around the courtyard, connecting everything around together is very crucial part here… Altogether, the space is very relaxing but strong…

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Centerpoints 8.2

Disnification: As filmmaker Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me) and anti-shopping culturejammer Rev. Billy use Disney’s typeface to excoriate Christmas’ consumerist overdrive, photographer Annie Liebovitz signs on to do an all-celebrity series of portraits for the Magic Kingdom. Dismantling Democracy: In an audio slideshow, Geoff Edgers at the Boston Globe gives a good overview of the […]

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Disnification: As filmmaker Morgan Spurlock (Super Size Me) and anti-shopping culturejammer Rev. Billy use Disney’s typeface to excoriate Christmas’ consumerist overdrive, photographer Annie Liebovitz signs on to do an all-celebrity series of portraits for the Magic Kingdom.

Dismantling Democracy: In an audio slideshow, Geoff Edgers at the Boston Globe gives a good overview of the controversy over — and dismantling of — Christoph Bchel’s Training Ground for Democracy at MASS MoCA.

Olafur’s home videos: Greg Allen points out three in-studio videos shot as Olafur Eliasson worked on his recent BMW art-car project at SFMOMA. Eliasson’s Your mobile expectations pictured above (center).

Trash and Treasure: A Rufino Tamayo painting found in a New York trashcan is up for auction. The expected top bid at the Nov. 20 sale: between $750,000 and $1 million.

Rhizome redesigns.

Fear Gear

Scary times call for… ingenious outfits? Aya Tsukioka says she got the idea for her new clothing line from the ninja, stealth martial artists who can blend into any surrounding. She’s created a kimono that folds out to make a full-sized vending machine, inside which its wearer can hide; a purse that expands to a […]

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Scary times call for… ingenious outfits?

Aya Tsukioka says she got the idea for her new clothing line from the ninja, stealth martial artists who can blend into any surrounding. She’s created a kimono that folds out to make a full-sized vending machine, inside which its wearer can hide; a purse that expands to a photorealistic manhole cover; a kids’ backpack that mimics the design of a pay phone.

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The designs, while impractical, nod to very real fears in Japan. But according to the New York Times they don’t necessarily fit reality: Crime in Japan, at just one-seventh the rate in the US, is actually trending downward.

But the camo couture also speaks to a Japanese trait of laying low, rather than fighting back, as Americans might. “It is just easier for Japanese to hide,” Ms. Tsukioka said. “Making a scene would be too embarrassing.”

0aaladejbbn.jpgFor Muslims in an era of post-9/11 fear and stereotyping, survival garb might include something more overt but with room for secrecy. Artist Azra Aksamija, an MIT architecture Ph.D. candidate studying with Krzysztof Wodiczko, has created the Dirndlmoschee (Dirndl Dress Mosque). Designed after the daily outfit still worn by some women in Austria, the piece includes a silk scarf that can be used as a veil, an apron that converts to a prayer mat, and a belt that holds a compass on a caribiner (for finding the direction of Mecca) and prayer beads.

Her Survival Mosque is site-specific for the United States. The burka is covered with the stars and stripes, but a closer look reveals much more:

The mosque is self-sufficient; the prayer rug is supplying its own energy source via photo-voltaic solar cells. It also carries different liturgical and practical features such as washing solution for ablution and for cleaning when a Muslim get spit on, ear plugs against insults, American constitution proofing rights of American Muslims, weapons and amulets, a loud-speaker with speech on tolerance held by President George W. Bush, ablution slippers, Quran, educative books and diverse communication devices. The Survival Mosque can be transformed and camouflaged into interactive bags, which communicate with each other via blue-tooth technology. The bag-speakers reflect paranoia spreading messages regarding terrorism, but they can also function as muezzins; calling for prayer at particular prayer times.

A hole new course: Designs wanted for mini-golf

Art and architecture merge with miniature golf in this open call to create holes for the next Walker in the Rough — a new, temporary mini-golf course at the Walker Art Center. Walker in the Rough, which debuted in 2004, returns in 2008 to the grass that will house the Walker’s future park, on the […]

Art and architecture merge with miniature golf in this open call to create holes for the next Walker in the Rough — a new, temporary mini-golf course at the Walker Art Center.

minigolf3.JPGWalker in the Rough, which debuted in 2004, returns in 2008 to the grass that will house the Walker’s future park, on the western edge of the museum. Your job, as a potential designer, is creating one of the 10 workable, playable holes that will dot the course. A panel of curators, artists, architects and one golf pro will judge the entries. Selected designers will receive stipends of $3,000. Deadline for submissions is Jan. 14, 2008.

The course, which opens Memorial Day weekend and closes in early September, will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden. Organizers are encouraging designers to create tie-ins to the traveling exhibition Design for the Other 90%, which comes to the Walker in spring 2008. Proposals should also address issues such as water, communication, shelter, transportation, and sustainability. Extra consideration will be given to holes made of recycled materials or materials that can be recycled.

Print or download an application here. For more info, contact Christi Atkinson, associate director of Education and Community Programs, at (612) 375-7572 or christi.atkinson@walkerart.org.

Interactive projection on York Minster cathedral

Haque Design + Research has created an fantastic 80,000 lumen interactive projection on the facade of York Minster cathedral, in York, England. It is called Evoke: The facade is brought to life by members of the public, who use their own voices to “evoke” colourful light patterns that emerge at the building’s foundations and soar […]

York Minster cathedralHaque Design + Research has created an fantastic 80,000 lumen interactive projection on the facade of York Minster cathedral, in York, England. It is called Evoke:

The facade is brought to life by members of the public, who use their own voices to “evoke” colourful light patterns that emerge at the building’s foundations and soar up towards the sky, giving the surface a magical feeling as it melts with colour.

People with voices of different frequencies, rhythms or cadences will be able to evoke quite different magical patterns upon the surface of the building – a staccato chirping will result in a completely different set of visual effects to a long howl for example, blending old and new to continue animating the facade of the Minster.

I would love to see video of this. This may be blasphemy, but it has a look reminiscent of a blinged-out myspace page or a super-saturated screenprint test page. The neon colors are totally foreign to gothic architecture, and it looks like something too far out for even a Blade Runner world.

[via Interactive Architecture]

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