Blogs Centerpoints

Centerpoints 8.0

Yoko’s Tower of Light: Today Democracy Now spent an hour with Yoko Ono discussing the unveiling of her peace tower in Reykjavik (attended by Sean Lennon and Ringo Starr), government surveillance of her late husband, and the intersections of art and politics. And here’s a video on the concept and construction of the tower of […]

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Yoko’s Tower of Light: Today Democracy Now spent an hour with Yoko Ono discussing the unveiling of her peace tower in Reykjavik (attended by Sean Lennon and Ringo Starr), government surveillance of her late husband, and the intersections of art and politics. And here’s a video on the concept and construction of the tower of light extending into the Iceland sky.

2007 Power 100: Art Review‘s “Power 100″ is out, again featuring Francois Pinault at the top of the list of art’s most influential figures. Also making the list: former Walker curator and current Hammer senior curator Gary Garrels (58), Thomas Hirschhorn (44), former Walker chief curator and current New Museum curator Richard Flood (29), and Walker designers Herzog & de Meuron (77).

Yto Barrada interviewed: In a two-part audio interview with Open Democracy, artist Yto Barrada, featured in the Walker’s Brave New Worlds exhibition, discusses how, as a political science student she stumbled onto art: “I was living in the West Bank working on roadblocks, and the strategies of people who tried to cross in negotiating with the Israeli police, military police, and I started documenting my work with photographs,” she said. “And as my work evolved I started taking more photographs than notes, and then it completely shifted. The main part of my way of describing what I was interested in became through photographs, because I discovered that it was less restrictive than only my dissertation in political science. I started to be interested in art and all the possibilities it gave me to introduce the political situation.”

Fresh Prince

The New Yorker has reviewed Richard Prince’s retrospective at the Guggenheim, which comes to the Walker in March 2008. (For some reason, the review is dated Oct. 15 — three days from now.) In calling the show “seductive,” Peter Schjeldahl, the magazine’s art critic, says this: “If ‘quintessential artist in a generation’ were a job […]

The New Yorker has reviewed Richard Prince’s retrospective at the Guggenheim, which comes to the Walker in March 2008. (For some reason, the review is dated Oct. 15 — three days from now.) In calling the show “seductive,” Peter Schjeldahl, the magazine’s art critic, says this: “If ‘quintessential artist in a generation’ were a job opening, Prince … would be an inevitable hire.”

Doesn’t sound like much of an EOE policy to me. I’m wondering where Schjeldahl is placing these generational boundaries. You’d certainly be hard-pressed to find a more eclectic artist. The show spans photography, painting, sculpture, illustration, installation, text pieces, pop art, abstractions — all with several incarnations.

Inevitability notwithstanding, I can think of a few names at least deserving peeks at the phantom job listing. Any suggestions on others who should apply?

In their own words: Dan and Lia Perjovschi

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMkcZQEkIQ4[/youtube] Brave New Worlds artists Dan and Lia Perjovschi also have a mid-career retrospective, States of Mind, up at the Nasher Museum of Art. To promote the show (which closes in January), the Nasher produced a nice video. Directed by David Colagiovanni (who also directed their Street-Level piece) and with original music by two friends […]

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMkcZQEkIQ4[/youtube]

Brave New Worlds artists Dan and Lia Perjovschi also have a mid-career retrospective, States of Mind, up at the Nasher Museum of Art. To promote the show (which closes in January), the Nasher produced a nice video. Directed by David Colagiovanni (who also directed their Street-Level piece) and with original music by two friends of Colagiovanni, it offers a good introduction to this Romanian husband-and-wife team, in their own words.

Coming soon: The Walker Channel will show video from the October 4 panel discussion on art and political consciousness with Brave New Worlds artists Perjovschi, Runa Islam, Jorge Macchi, and Haegue Yang, moderated by curators Doryun Chong and Yasmil Raymond.

Market Quotes

Jim and Mary Barr compile a list of quotes about the art market from Jerry Saltz’ New York essay, Has Money Ruined Art? My favorite is by David Hammons: “The system is making people offers they can’t refuse when it should be making them offers they can’t understand.” Meanwhile Tyler Green points out Hayward Gallery […]

Jim and Mary Barr compile a list of quotes about the art market from Jerry Saltz’ New York essay, Has Money Ruined Art? My favorite is by David Hammons: “The system is making people offers they can’t refuse when it should be making them offers they can’t understand.”

Meanwhile Tyler Green points out Hayward Gallery director Ralph Rugoff‘s thoughts on the art market and how “it certainly has an effect on what I do”:

All the attention of it — how much money is paid for a Peter Doig or a Damien Hirst — distracts us from thinking about what the work is about. It’s amazing that these contemporary artworks are selling for as much money as they do, but I don’t think it necessarily helps anybody appreciate what’s interesting about contemporary art.

Geek Bling

For those of you with low cash flows but rising internet currency, here’s a new way to show bling: An LED ring that displays the current number of Google hits a search on your name generates. Just slip it into a docking station at your computer, do a search, take the ring, and go, confident […]

Centerpoints 7.9

“We are shifting the axis of the world…” On the 67th anniversary of John Lennon’s birth, Yoko Ono commemorates a Peace Tower in Reykjavic with a poem. Avant-Rustic: Aside from its Santiago Cucullu wall mural, Blu Dot cofounder John Christakos’ cabin in Minong, Wis., is just like any other cabin. Right? “Creative people must be […]

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“We are shifting the axis of the world…” On the 67th anniversary of John Lennon’s birth, Yoko Ono commemorates a Peace Tower in Reykjavic with a poem.

Avant-Rustic: Aside from its Santiago Cucullu wall mural, Blu Dot cofounder John Christakos’ cabin in Minong, Wis., is just like any other cabin. Right?

“Creative people must be stopped!” Michael Fallon ponders that bumpersticker-inspired thesis: “[W]e’ve become so inundated with creativity–in weblogs dedicated to every petty interest and whim, in vanity websites created by people of not much interest, in random belly-gazing podcasts of the braindead, in home-edited YouTube snoozefests, in well-meaning ‘preprofessional’ writing associations, in endless craft groups and quilting associations and art meet-ups, and so on and so on–that actual audiences for honest-to-goodness good art and real creativity and cultural production are driven into hiding.”

The interviews: R.U. Sirius interviews Steve Kurtz of Critical Art Ensemble (via); Jen Bekman interviews photographer Alec Soth about his issue of Fashion Magazine; Wired interviews Ridley Scott (above, center left) on the Blade Runner Director’s Cut, and last but not least, Vita.mn interviews Olga Viso.

Bored guy ponders creative impetus behind Spoonbridge and Cherry: Here’s the video.

Walker(s) in the news

Kara Walker’s getting a lot of press and, by extension, so is the Walker, around the artist’s traveling retrospective “ My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love,” which premiered at the Walker last February. In his illuminating profile for The New Yorker (this links only to an abstract), tied to the show’s run at […]

Kara Walker’s getting a lot of press and, by extension, so is the Walker, around the artist’s traveling retrospective “ My Complement, My Enemy, My Oppressor, My Love,” which premiered at the Walker last February.

In his illuminating profile for The New Yorker (this links only to an abstract), tied to the show’s run at the ARC/Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Hilton Als tips to Philippe Vergne, the Walker’s Deputy Director and Chief Curator, who curated the exhibition. “Endless Conundrum,” on loan from the Walker, illustrates a brief in The New York Times about the exhibition’s run at the Whitney (scroll to the bottom for the text) . Art in America Magazine gives the exhibition its October cover.

Art responds to Burma

A vital aspect of contemporary art is that it often attempts to fulfill its aesthetic imperative while embodying a deep awareness of the world that gives it context. So as news continues to spread about the violent crackdown by Burma‘s junta against Buddhist monks, nuns, and civilians who peacefully demonstrated for democracy, it’s heartening to […]

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A vital aspect of contemporary art is that it often attempts to fulfill its aesthetic imperative while embodying a deep awareness of the world that gives it context. So as news continues to spread about the violent crackdown by Burma‘s junta against Buddhist monks, nuns, and civilians who peacefully demonstrated for democracy, it’s heartening to see a response from artists and curators.

Today, a group of 30 individuals with Asian roots wrote an open letter on Burma to express dismay, call for change, and put forth hope for a freer society where the kind of diversity of ideas vital to contemporary art can be available to all in Burma.

Will it help? Who knows. But I for one am grateful to these people — including Walker curator Doryun Chong, former Walker and REDCAT curators Eungie Joo and Clara Kim, Brave New Worlds artist Haegue Yang, Walker global advisory committee member and independent curator Hou Hanru, and many others — for having taken this step to be clear which side many of us, artists and audiences of all ethnicities and countries of origin, are on.

AN OPEN LETTER FOR BURMA

October 3, 2007

From people of Asian background in the arts:

We write to express our extreme dismay at the brutality of the military regime of Burma (Myanmar) against protesters who have been peacefully asking for change in that Asian nation. Led by Buddhist monks and nuns, tens of thousands of people have marched in Burma’s cities and towns in recent week. This has been an inspiring example of nonviolent resistance which has caught the attention of the entire world.

Unfortunately, the military dictatorship has chosen to meet this challenge not with negotiation, but with gunfire from automatic weapons. Monks and nuns have been viciously beaten and arrested, students and journalists shot in the street, and whole cities are now under a military reign of terror.

As citizens of the world, as artists valuing free expression, as people of Asian heritage, we write in support of the courageous Buddhist monks and nuns, and other people from all religions and walks of life in Burma, as they continue to seek peaceful change and national reconciliation.

We demand an immediate end to the violence against the protesters, and a release of all political prisoners, including Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, dissident comedian Zarganar, and poet Bamaw

Nyo New.

We support the ongoing struggle of the people of Burma for basic human rights, and we admire their expressions of compassion for all humanity. As fellow humans, we stand with them.

Sincerely,

1. Maxine Hong Kingston

2. Linda Kim

3. Htein Lin

4. Amitav Ghosh

5. Khin Aye Than

6. Ruby Walters

7. Doryun Chong

8. Charmaine Craig

9. Huma Dar

10. Maya Lin

11. Tamara Chin

12. Bharat Venkat

13. Jerry Zee

14. Taro Shinoda

15. Mira Kamdar

16. Eungie Joo

17. Byron Kim

18. Pascal Khoo Thwe

19. Maryam Kashani

20. Kim Beom

21. Audrey Chan

22. Wei Hua Peng

23. Hou Hanru

24. Clara Kim

25. Kris Kuramitsu

26. Michael Ondaatje

27. Haegue Yang

28. Paisley Rekdal

29. Yiyun Li

30. Le Ly Hayslip

31. Gitanjali J. Hursh

32. Vasanthi Victor

Photo by Chaiwat Subprasom/REUETERS. A protester outside the Burmese embassy in Bangkok, holding a flyer showing the face of imprisoned opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on September 27, 2007.

Centerpoints 7.8

Pettibon’s albums: Paddy Johnson looks at Raymond Pettibon‘s album cover art, from classics for Black Flag, the Minutemen and Sonic Youth to a Jim Dine-inspired heart for the Foo Fighters. The artist currently known as Prince: While Roberta Smith at the New York Times gives Richard Prince’s Guggenheim retrospective ample coverage, I’m more a fan […]

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Pettibon’s albums: Paddy Johnson looks at Raymond Pettibon‘s album cover art, from classics for Black Flag, the Minutemen and Sonic Youth to a Jim Dine-inspired heart for the Foo Fighters.

The artist currently known as Prince: While Roberta Smith at the New York Times gives Richard Prince’s Guggenheim retrospective ample coverage, I’m more a fan of VBS.tv’s Art Talk multi-part series on the artist. He discusses his clay cars, “de Kooning paintings,” and the drawbacks to living in the “middle of nowhere” in upstate New York. (Thanks, Witt.)

Artblogging call for papers: “Does art blogging indicate the emergence of a dislocated, yet thoroughly local arts scene? …Is the quest for site traffic inherently at odds with healthy periods of gestation and dormancy? What models exist for balancing these forces?” With such questions in mind, the College Art Association is calling for paper’s on how art blogs are redefining notions of the open studio, local community, and artistic practice.

Gondry’s cellphone: Michel Gondry has made a commercial for Motorola’s RAZR2 phone. While we’re at it, here’s the trailer for his new film, Be Kind, Rewind.

RIP X-Marx Register Tape: The Museum of Forgotten Art Supplies chronicles “artistic tools, machinery, gadgets, etc. that [may] have bitten the dust.” Like “X-Marx,” transparent tape used to manually add registration marks to layouts and mechanicals. Via Coudal.

Think about emailing: Hey, remember those 30 lucky winners who got a free Walker “Think about honking if you [heart] conceptual art” bumpersticker? I wonder where they ended up. If you’re one of the lucky few, email me your photos and I’ll post them here. If not, you can still buy one.

Centerpoints 7.7

Aki honored: The Reykjavik International Film Festival opened last week with a concert by Sigur Ros and the awarding of the 2007 Creative Excellency Award by Iceland’s president Olafur Ragnar Grimmson to Aki Kaurismaki, subject of a 2004 Regis Dialogue and Retrospective at the Walker. The Loneliest Icelander: Iceland has already withdrawn its two troops […]

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Aki honored: The Reykjavik International Film Festival opened last week with a concert by Sigur Ros and the awarding of the 2007 Creative Excellency Award by Iceland’s president Olafur Ragnar Grimmson to Aki Kaurismaki, subject of a 2004 Regis Dialogue and Retrospective at the Walker.

The Loneliest Icelander: Iceland has already withdrawn its two troops from the “Coalition of the Willing” in Iraq, and today it announced that next month it will bring home its final citizen, a Crisis Response Unit member who’s been working with NATO to train the Iraqi army. The news inspired this (Icelandic-techno-rap-laden) video of that last, lonely Icelander’s tale.

Artists call for fuller, fairer look at MASS MoCA: On September 16, the New York Times’ Roberta Smith wrote on the conflict between artist Christoph Bchel and MASS MoCA; she called it a “depressing spectacle” and compared it to the 1989 cancellation of the infamous Robert Mapplethorpe show at the Corcoran. The first line of her story: “When a museum behaves badly, it’s never pretty.” The piece has inspired a flurry of letters to the editor, including, on Sunday, one from Yale curator Jock Reynolds, who was involved with the Corcoran’s Mapplethorpe show, calling for a “fuller and fairer” look at MASS MoCA’s conduct in this case. Also showing support in the Sunday letters: artist Laurie Anderson and Michael Gordon, David Lang and Julia Wolfe of Bang on a Can.

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