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Centerpoints 7.5

A moment of silence: French artist and mime master Marcel Marceau, who “brought poetry to silence” (AP), died Saturday night at age 84. Homer and Homage: A side-by-side comparison of Simpson’s scenes and the films that inspired them. Typography of the Times: After last week’s naughtily titled post about a new book of hand-drawn typography, […]

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A moment of silence: French artist and mime master Marcel Marceau, who “brought poetry to silence” (AP), died Saturday night at age 84.

Homer and Homage: A side-by-side comparison of Simpson’s scenes and the films that inspired them.

Typography of the Times: After last week’s naughtily titled post about a new book of hand-drawn typography, I noticed its author, Mike Perry (who’s giving a talk at MCAD, his alma mater, on October 10) did the type for a fashion spread in that week’s New York Times Magazine (these images, although the type only appears in the print edtion). This week’s “On Language” column by William Safire includes ceramic sculptural type by Stephanie DeArmond, also a onetime Minneapolitan and wife of former Walker designer Alex DeArmond.

Two shows: Curated by Lucy Lippard, Weather Report: Art & Climate Change at the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (now on view) “partners the art and scientific communities to create a visual dialogue surrounding climate change.” Francis Alÿs: Politics of Rehearsal opens September 30 at the Hammer in Los Angeles.

Absolutely Fabiola: For some 20 years, Francis Alÿs has collected paintings of the Catholic saint Fabiola. Each of his nearly 300 paintings is based on a now-lost original by 19th century French painter Jean-Jacques Henner. Last week, Alÿs’ collection went on view at the Hispanic Societey of America in New York. The Belgian artist first noticed two of the paintings at a Brussels flea market in 1992; he didn’t buy them but they registered in his mind: a woman in profile, always facing the same direction, always wearing red. He kept noticing the woman, rendered in paint, thread and carved wood. The ubiquity of the iconic image, Alÿs said, “indicates a different criterion of what a masterwork could be.” The Dia-commissioned exhibition is on view through April 2008.