Blogs Centerpoints

Heavy Metal Family Tree

In honor of last Thursday’s performance by doomcore greats SUNN0)) and Boris at the Walker, and to commemorate the Sunday New York Times Magazine‘s feature on “meta-metal,” I present this wonderfully low-tech “heavy metal family tree.” (Click the link to see the whole thing.) Via Mindgum.

In honor of last Thursday’s performance by doomcore greats SUNN0)) and Boris at the Walker, and to commemorate the Sunday New York Times Magazine‘s feature on “meta-metal,” I present this wonderfully low-tech “heavy metal family tree.” (Click the link to see the whole thing.)

Via Mindgum.

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Centerpoints 1.8

Un-Prom: WACTAC‘s Alex Smith (above, posing with his screenprinted men’s suits), co-founder of Turnstyle Clothing Authority, is just one of the young fashion designers featured in tomorrow night’s Un-Prom fashion show at the Walker. “Eccentrics”: Tod Browning’s famous 1932 film Freaks is now available on Google Video. [via wmmna] Aptly named: Steven Holl’s Turbulence house, […]

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Un-Prom: WACTAC‘s Alex Smith (above, posing with his screenprinted men’s suits), co-founder of Turnstyle Clothing Authority, is just one of the young fashion designers featured in tomorrow night’s Un-Prom fashion show at the Walker.

“Eccentrics”: Tod Browning’s famous 1932 film Freaks is now available on Google Video. [via wmmna]

Aptly named: Steven Holl’s Turbulence house, featured in Some Assembly Required: Contemporary Prefabricated Homes (now on view in Vancouver), couldn’t have a more appropriate name, it seems. Not yet completed and with costs doubling the original estimate, the aluminum-paneled guest cottage made for artist Richard Tuttle is too hot in summer and too cold in winter. “The place is uninhabitable half the time,” he says. “It turns out that the greatest invention, the one that made civilization possible, is caulking.”

Open-Source Laptop: MIT’s One Laptop Per Child program–the $100, open-source, crank-powered laptop–has released photos of a working prototype.

Blogging the Beeb: The BBC’s staff blogging guidelines, created collaboratively by users through a wiki.

Fresco Taxicab

As a museum marketing guy, I’ve gotta admire this campaign. Wien Nord Pilz’s prizewinning campaign for the Liechtenstein Museum included frescoes on the roof of the airport, in taxicabs, and on an umbrella. Via Fresh Creation.

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As a museum marketing guy, I’ve gotta admire this campaign. Wien Nord Pilz’s prizewinning campaign for the Liechtenstein Museum included frescoes on the roof of the airport, in taxicabs, and on an umbrella.

Via Fresh Creation.

Sarah Sze’s Corner Plot

Grow or Die is something you stumble upon, like a pottery shard you find when digging in your backyard. Installed in 2002 in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s Cowles Conservatory, the work by Sarah Sze is an underground tableau made of an odd assortment of Q-tips, pencils, circuitry wire, and styrofoam. If you notice it, you’ll […]

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Grow or Die is something you stumble upon, like a pottery shard you find when digging in your backyard. Installed in 2002 in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden’s Cowles Conservatory, the work by Sarah Sze is an underground tableau made of an odd assortment of Q-tips, pencils, circuitry wire, and styrofoam. If you notice it, you’ll see a plexiglass window breaking the red pattern of bricks in the Conservatory’s floor; peering down, you’ll see a strange miniature world.

Sze’s newest piece, Corner Plot, adds a new dimension to this notion: instead of a flat window looking down into the ground, she’s constructed a brick corner jutting out of the cobblestones, as if a building has tipped and sunk, on the corner of 60th Street and Fifth Avenue, right near Central Park. A window in the building (which is an exact replica of the apartment hi-rise across the street) offers a puzzling view of the contents of a life: books, a large leaf from a plant, an iPod, a microscope. Like our piece, Corner Plot is about discovery–stumbling upon a surprising find and wondering what it all means.

New York magazine has a nice slideshow of the creation of the piece. Via Gothamist.

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Interior view of Corner Plot in Sze’s studio

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Details of Grow or Die in the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden

Artist videos: Song Dong, Holzer, Minter, Forsythe

Creative Time‘s new video site has some great little videos featuring artists they fund: Marilyn Minter on her Whitney Biennial billboards, Song Dong marking time with water and a brush on the sidewalks of New York, Jenny Holzer discussing last year’s project For the City, an interview with choreographer William Forsythe, and more.

The Clean Hub

Architect John Dwyer has designed The Clean Hub, a sustainable housing design for areas with insufficient infrastructure. The name fits its multipurpose sanitation and energy functions: the 10 x 20-foot unit includes a V-shaped roof that collects rainwater, an underground reverse-osmosis filtration system to recycle and store gray water from showers and laundry facilities, and […]

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Architect John Dwyer has designed The Clean Hub, a sustainable housing design for areas with insufficient infrastructure. The name fits its multipurpose sanitation and energy functions: the 10 x 20-foot unit includes a V-shaped roof that collects rainwater, an underground reverse-osmosis filtration system to recycle and store gray water from showers and laundry facilities, and 16 rooftop adjustable photovoltaic panels that can generate up to 2,600 watts of energy. For more on this architectural Swiss Army knife, visit Utne.

Dwyer is a member of Minnesota’s chapter of Architecture for Humanity, an organization founded by Cameron Sinclair and Kate Stohr. The duo was just named winners of a Wired 2006 Rave Award, saluting “The People Changing Your Mind.” I got the chance to interview Sinclair, who visits the Walker June 13 to keynote PUSH, for the forthcoming book Land, Art: A Cultural Ecology Handbook, edited by former Walker visual arts curatorial fellow Max Andrews for the Royal Society of the Arts’ Art & Ecology program. Excerpts here.

Richard Serra: Rolled and Forged

We visited the Chelsea location of the Gagosian gallery for the new Richard Serra show. The space is quite amazing and very well suited to the scale and magnitude of these massive sculptures. Here are some images:

We visited the Chelsea location of the Gagosian gallery for the new Richard Serra show. The space is quite amazing and very well suited to the scale and magnitude of these massive sculptures. Here are some images:

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Bigfoot & Neck Face

From a storefront on the Lower East Side…

From a storefront on the Lower East Side…Bigfoot-NeckFace.jpg

It’s a small world

No real news there, but imagine my surprise when walking down 24th St. in Chelsea, NYC, I run into a friend from Minneapolis, and Open-Ended resident artist, Matt Bakkom! (don’t miss the capture the flag game that will complete Matt’s Open-Ended activities) We walked into the Zach Feuer Gallery and looked at Nathalie Djurburg’s show. […]

No real news there, but imagine my surprise when walking down 24th St. in Chelsea, NYC, I run into a friend from Minneapolis, and Open-Ended resident artist, Matt Bakkom! (don’t miss the capture the flag game that will complete Matt’s Open-Ended activities) We walked into the Zach Feuer Gallery and looked at Nathalie Djurburg’s show. The Show was compised of films starring plasticine puppets in pornographic and transgrssive scenarios. Aestheticallly, I think Matt described it well as falling somehwere between “internet fetish pages and saturday morning cartoons.” It was strange, and at times disturbing, but transfixing.

Centerpoints 1.7

And the Steel Truss Award goes to… Structural engineers don’t have the most visible–or sexy–jobs around, so let me take this opportunity to congratulate Minneapolis’ HGA for winning an Honor Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies for the mind-bogglingly complicated engineering of the new Walker. The heights of virtuosity: A piano has been […]

And the Steel Truss Award goes to… Structural engineers don’t have the most visible–or sexy–jobs around, so let me take this opportunity to congratulate Minneapolis’ HGA for winning an Honor Award from the American Council of Engineering Companies for the mind-bogglingly complicated engineering of the new Walker.

The heights of virtuosity: A piano has been discovered within 200 metres of the peak of Britain’s highest mountain, Ben Nevis. A biscuit wrapper found next to the piano suggests its placement goes back to at least 1986.

Viva la Pamphlet! Prickly Paradigm Press has been reviving the old-time pamphlet through a series of short publications on art, politics, and culture. A few are available as free pdfs (“Fragments of an Anarchist Anthropology,” by Yale’s David Graeber, and The Baffler publisher Tom Frank offering perspectives on cultural studies from the left and right, for instance); others–like “Museum, Inc.” (a critique of the corporatization of art, by NYU’s Paul Werner)–are just ten bucks.

Who knew? Not me: Arts Journal has an Arts Journalism Blog, featuring writers like Tyler Green, the Star Tribune‘s Claude Peck, Terry Teachout, and a dozen other critics.

Snurt? Prsk? Snort? Funny, when looking at this photo, it’s not the sound the animal is making that I’m wondering about:

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