Blogs Centerpoints

Wi-fi-ing over at the MPLS airport

Yeah, I’m done now. That was good fun, really. Drop on by my own blog if you haven’t had enough punishment already. http://blog.wired.com/sterling/ Bruce S. PS: Write if you get honest work!

Yeah, I’m done now. That was good fun, really.

Drop on by my own blog if you haven’t had enough punishment already.

http://blog.wired.com/sterling/

Bruce S.

PS: Write if you get honest work!

Off-kilter Kinkade

Something’s amiss in Thomas “Painter of Light” Kinkade’s idyllic village, according to a recent Los Angeles Times expose that alleges shady business dealings, drunkenness and belligerence (he reportedly heckled Siegrfied and Roy!). The photoshoppers at Something Awful seem to have presaged the accusations with their series of altered Kincaids, created two years ago. Via NewsGrist.

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Something’s amiss in Thomas “Painter of Light” Kinkade’s idyllic village, according to a recent Los Angeles Times expose that alleges shady business dealings, drunkenness and belligerence (he reportedly heckled Siegrfied and Roy!). The photoshoppers at Something Awful seem to have presaged the accusations with their series of altered Kincaids, created two years ago.

Via NewsGrist.

How to read a shoe.

The gist–or one of them–of Bruce Sterling’s book about product design and environmental change (Shaping Things) is accessible transparency; that is, the on-demand ability to pull information about the products we buy using RFID tags and the net: physical or chemical makeup, place of origin or where a product ends up after the intended use […]

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The gist–or one of them–of Bruce Sterling’s book about product design and environmental change (Shaping Things) is accessible transparency; that is, the on-demand ability to pull information about the products we buy using RFID tags and the net: physical or chemical makeup, place of origin or where a product ends up after the intended use is “completed,” info on the maker or others who use that product, the working conditions of those who created the good, etc. (here’s Sterling’s speech on this “internet of things“).

But Bruce admits that reality is pretty far away. In the meantime, here’s a low-fi way to get basic info on products: learn the codes. Kicksonline demystifies the label on your Nikes, decoding numbers that refer to the manufacture date, factory and country of origin, and other details. Like barcodes, the PLU (product look-up) code on fruits or vegetabes can tell you the variety, as well as if it’s organic (a five-digit number beginning with a 9), conventionally grown (a four-digit number starting with a 4), genetically engineered (a five-digit number beginning with an 8), etc.

Shoes to spimes: Bruce Sterling in Minneapolis

After last night’s dinner with Bruce Sterling, we were joined by Chuck Olsen, the man behind the film Blogumentary and the videoblog Minnesota Stories. Hear Sterling’s thoughts on everything from the pot roast at Minneapolis’ Modern Cafe to what happens to the atomized rubber created when our shoes wear down to his notion of “spimes” […]

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After last night’s dinner with Bruce Sterling, we were joined by Chuck Olsen, the man behind the film Blogumentary and the videoblog Minnesota Stories. Hear Sterling’s thoughts on everything from the pot roast at Minneapolis’ Modern Cafe to what happens to the atomized rubber created when our shoes wear down to his notion of “spimes” (objects that are trackable over space and time using RFID chips). Watch it here, then join us for Sterling’s free discussion with Rirkrit Tiravanija at the Walker tonight.

Thanks to Bruce and Boingboing‘s Xeni Jardin for guest-blogging at Off Center over the past few weeks.

Station.

With the opening of OPEN-ENDED (the art of engagement) just a few days away, the exhibition’s first component is nearly complete. Called untitled 2005 (demo station no. 5), Rirkrit Tiravanija’s spiral-shaped installation was inspired by Austrian designer Friedrich Kiesler’s theatrical “space-stage” of the 1920s. But the performers in this case will be visitors to the […]

With the opening of OPEN-ENDED (the art of engagement) just a few days away, the exhibition’s first component is nearly complete. Called untitled 2005 (demo station no. 5), Rirkrit Tiravanija’s spiral-shaped installation was inspired by Austrian designer Friedrich Kiesler’s theatrical “space-stage” of the 1920s. But the performers in this case will be visitors to the gallery who will use the space during open-mic nights and performances, a fashion show and artist talks. The piece will also house a video booth (a video version of a fotomat booth) by filmmaker Spencer Nakasako. Visitors can choose to respond to questions in front of a camera, and their responses will be fed into a video jukebox and randomly played on the screen. (The galleries will also host a series of Thai and Chinese experimental films.)

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“Stations” have appeared in Tiravanija’s work many times, from TV and radio stations to the title of a section of the 2003 Venice Biennale he co-curated called Utopia Station. The first of Tiravanija’s stations was installed at Portikus in Frankfurt, Germany, in 2001; it hosted a range of events including a series of “cooking battles” (Daniel Birnbaum vs. Udo Kittelmann! Frankfurt vs. Glasgow!) and was the temporary home to the editorial offices of Tiravanija’s magazine oVer (the goings-on were broadcast online at SuperChannel.org). As a metaphor, Tiravanija’s stations are simply temporary stopping points where people can come and… do things, sort of like a craft table crossed with a train platform. “We are part of a process and the station is on the move; the presentation in Venice is a starting point for more stations to appear. We are not looking for success or failure but a discussion which can flow into the future, to future station, to possibilities,” he said of Utopia Station.

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Choreographer Ralph Lemon is also here installing his component of the show, an installation adapted from the final performance of his Geography trilogy, Come home Charley Patton. These three artists, who have been part of past artist residencies, will present these works against a backdrop of art created by other artists-in-residence, including Catherine Opie and Sam Durant.

Meet Tiravanija, Nakasako, and Lemon at an opening-day event on Saturday, March 25, from 1 to 4 pm. Tiravanija will be in dialogue with writer Bruce Sterling tomorrow night.

Aesthetic Competition

March Madness has hit the arts, at least according to LeisureArts. They’ve drawn up an NCAA-style bracket that pits 64 art collectives in an imagined monthlong battle. Will the Center for Land-Use Interpretation end up drubbing The Yes Men? Or are you putting your money on Atlas Group, the Critical Art Ensemble, Superflex, n55, or […]

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March Madness has hit the arts, at least according to LeisureArts. They’ve drawn up an NCAA-style bracket that pits 64 art collectives in an imagined monthlong battle. Will the Center for Land-Use Interpretation end up drubbing The Yes Men? Or are you putting your money on Atlas Group, the Critical Art Ensemble, Superflex, n55, or COBRA? (And how does an art collective nail a three-pointer?)

Just like the NCAA, LeisureArts is looking for corporate sponsorship, but their only likely candidate – Bernadette Corporation – hasn’t responded yet. As the comments suggest, we art types take our aesthetic competitions seriously: one anonymous person called it “ elitist crap,” while others challenged the exclusion of collectives based outside the US (although there are some). I, too, wonder why my favorite collectives aren’t included: Futurefarmers, the Bureau of Inverse Technology, Mejor Vida Corp., or the ever-weird but demonstratedly scrappy Atelier van Lieshout. Here’s your chance to link-dump: what are your favorite collectives?

(Thanks, Reid.)

Design Observer

I faithfully read Design Observer — specifically BECAUSE they talk like public intellectuals instead of moaning into their beer about serifs.

I faithfully read Design Observer — specifically BECAUSE they talk like public intellectuals instead of moaning into their beer about serifs.

Flying Carpet

Seyed Alavi on the 2005 work Flying Carpet: This project consists of an aerial view of the Sacramento River that is woven into a carpet for the floor of a pedestrian bridge connecting the terminal to the parking garage. This image represents approximately 50 miles of the Sacramento River starting just outside of Colusa, California […]

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Seyed Alavi on the 2005 work Flying Carpet:

This project consists of an aerial view of the Sacramento River that is woven into a carpet for the floor of a pedestrian bridge connecting the terminal to the parking garage. This image represents approximately 50 miles of the Sacramento River starting just outside of Colusa, California and ending about 6 miles south of Chico.

In addition to recalling the experience of flight and flying, this piece, by depicting the larger geographical area, also helps to reinforce a sense of belonging and/or connection for the traveler. In this way, the carpet can also be read and experienced as a “ welcome mat” for visitors arriving in Sacramento. The siting of this piece on a bridge also helps to highlight a few other conceptual aspects of the work. A bridge is a connection between two destinations; it is not a destination in and of itself; it is neither here, nor there. In this way it is similar to an airplane, or a river connecting one place to another; here to there; a moment of flight frozen in mid air; a flowing river that takes us along with its current to another destination. In this way, the piece also creates a koanic relationship between a river and a bridge, since their ordinary position have been turned around, and it is now the river that is on/above the bridge.

Via Pruned.

Bangkok’s Mega-Bridge

“In order to relieve the commercial traffic congestion around the industrial areas of Bangkok Port, Poochao Saming Phrai Road and Suksawat Road the King initiated the idea of a ring road system.” Now in construction, the Industrial Ring Road Bridge (aka Mega-Bridge) stretches 13 km and required the demolition of 881 houses and factories and […]

“In order to relieve the commercial traffic congestion around the industrial areas of Bangkok Port, Poochao Saming Phrai Road and Suksawat Road the King initiated the idea of a ring road system.” Now in construction, the Industrial Ring Road Bridge (aka Mega-Bridge) stretches 13 km and required the demolition of 881 houses and factories and the commissioning of the world’s largest moveable scaffolding system.

More details here.

In other bridge news: Workers inspecting the structural foundation of the Brooklyn Bridge have found a stockpile of ’50s-era survival rations that suggest the depth of fear during the Cold War. Discovered in the bridge vault were water drums, paper blankets, medical supplies, drugs designed to treat shock, and 352,000 Civil Defense All-Purpose Survival Crackers–still intact.

Earlier: Structural zeal: Engineering the new Walker

Santiago Piedrafita in ID magazine.

I’m a bit late on this one but I just saw our long time colleague, former Senior Designer at the Walker, now chair of MCAD‘s Design department, got included in ID Magazine. They put together a list of 40 of the world’s most important and underappreciated artists, designers, architects and other visual professionals in the […]

I’m a bit late on this one but I just saw our long time colleague, former Senior Designer at the Walker, now chair of MCAD‘s Design department, got included in ID Magazine. They put together a list of 40 of the world’s most important and underappreciated artists, designers, architects and other visual professionals in the February issue.

MCAD has an announcement on their site with link to the PDF featuring Mr. Piedrafita. I always knew we were working with an underappreciated design star here, now it’s good to see the national design press has picked up on it.

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